Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Scarf Joints below waterline?

Expand Messages
  • Jon
    I wouldn t worry about it. Often times a good scarf joint is stronger than the wood itself. Jon ... __________________________________________________ Do You
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 2, 2005
      I wouldn't worry about it. Often times a good scarf
      joint is stronger than the wood itself.

      Jon


      --- George <onespecialdj@...> wrote:

      >
      > Hello all,
      >
      > I am on the Florida west coast, and even though I
      > have finaly found
      > a source for s4s clear western red cedar, the
      > longest lengths they
      > have are 12 foot. Or at least that what they said on
      > the phone.
      >
      > My question is this, I plan on building a 19 foot
      > kayak, and have
      > intended on creating the 20 foot long peices from
      > the 12 footers by
      > scarfing them together to make one long strip.
      >
      > Just talking with some locals they don't recommend
      > using these
      > strips below the waterline.
      >
      > If I will be fiberglassing the outside and inside of
      > the kayak why
      > would this matter?
      >
      > thanks
      > george
      >
      >
      >
      >


      __________________________________________________
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
      http://mail.yahoo.com
    • Ron
      Hey George, I to, am building a Kayak. I choose not to use scarf joints, I used butt joints. I don t think above or below the water line makes a bit of
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 2, 2005
        Hey George, I to, am building a Kayak. I choose not to use scarf
        joints, I used butt joints. I don't think above or below the water
        line makes a bit of difference. The strength and waterproofing comes
        from the fiberglass and epoxy, not the splices in the strips. I used
        scarf joints on the canoe I built and I think a clean butt joint is
        less noticable than the scarf joint. I would, as suggested, stagger
        the joints from end to end or even from station to station to keep
        the joints from lining up, for strength and looks.
        Of course this is just my humble opinion!
        Ron Mc
        I did just post some updated pictures on my site for those of you
        who want to see my progress.
        http://groups.msn.com/Buildingstripcanoes/shoebox.msnw

        --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "George"
        <onespecialdj@y...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello all,
        >
        > I am on the Florida west coast, and even though I have finaly
        found
        > a source for s4s clear western red cedar, the longest lengths they
        > have are 12 foot. Or at least that what they said on the phone.
        >
        > My question is this, I plan on building a 19 foot kayak, and have
        > intended on creating the 20 foot long peices from the 12 footers
        by
        > scarfing them together to make one long strip.
        >
        > Just talking with some locals they don't recommend using these
        > strips below the waterline.
        >
        > If I will be fiberglassing the outside and inside of the kayak why
        > would this matter?
        >
        > thanks
        > george
      • OneSpecialDJ
        Thank you Everyone for your comments and suggestions, your help has made me feel a lot better about using scarf joints in my First Kayak Project!!!! Now the
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 3, 2005
          Thank you Everyone for your comments and suggestions, your help has made me feel a lot better about using scarf joints in my First Kayak Project!!!!

          Now the only problem I need to figure out is how to fit a 19 ft kayak into a 20 ft garage


          ---------------------------------
          Do you Yahoo!?
          Yahoo! Search presents - Jib Jab's 'Second Term'

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • J. R. Sloan
          ... kayak into a 20 ft garage ... JR s note: One way might be diagonally.... Seriously, it s an easy project to put four hooks into your garage ceiling for 4
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 3, 2005
            --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, OneSpecialDJ
            <onespecialdj@y...> wrote:
            > Now the only problem I need to figure out is how to fit a 19 ft
            kayak into a 20 ft garage
            >
            JR's note: One way might be diagonally....

            Seriously, it's an easy project to put four hooks into your garage
            ceiling for 4 small pulleys, two on each side of the canoe. I rest
            my canoes on the car rack to get it into the garage. Then, with
            small poles that are wider than the gunnels as hanging supports, I
            string nylon cord from the first hook in the ceiling down to loop
            round the first pole, back up to the pulley on the first hook, over
            to the second hook and through its pulley, down to loop round the
            pole on the other side, and back up to the pulley on the second
            hook. Same thing on the rear. Now I can lift the canoe off the car
            inside the garage easily, store it up above forehead height, tie
            off the two lift lines to a cleat on the wall, and wait until the
            next excursion.

            One consideration: the garage door has to be mounted low enough to
            clear the canoe's profile. First time I tried this in my wife's
            garage, the ceiling was too low and I nearly decapitated myself, the
            canoe and her Geo Metro.

            JR
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.