Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Super Opportunity, and canoe building questions

Expand Messages
  • suetv123
    JR, That was a great find! And a good price too (free). Was wondering - Is the douglas fir strong enough (yet not too brittle) to go thin on the strips? I was
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 1, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      JR,
      That was a great find! And a good price too (free). Was wondering -
      Is the douglas fir strong enough (yet not too brittle) to go thin on
      the strips? I was thinking of a smaller canoe or boat that would be
      for up to 4 people. I still hope to build a strip canoe or boat.
      When you get to Puget Sound... let us know. There are usually Native
      canoes practicing someplace most any time if the weather is decent.

      Sue & Ben

      --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "J. R. Sloan"
      <jr_sloan@m...> wrote:
      > I just stumbled on a large supply of free, salvaged douglas fir
      > planks in the 1' x 12" size, most in excess of 12 feet long. My
      tools
      > will let me reduce the pile to strips of any size I want, I think.
      >
      > For more comfort in my next decade, I'm thinking that a longer and
      > wider boat than the canoe I did last year is in order, with
      > correspondingly larger and thicker strips. I have in mind a 20'-
      22'
      > flat-bottomed sailboat, yet with the characteristics of one of our
      > canoe/kayak strippers: light, tough, resilient and home-built with
      > care and epoxy. My first impulse was to rig her with a schooner
      > setup, but more thought leans toward a simpler catboat rig. Most
      of
      > my trips will be sailing/fishing on the impoundments behind the
      dams
      > in the Pacific Northwest's Inland Empire, maybe a rare excursion
      into
      > Puget Sound or the Lower Columbia.
      >
      > I'd appreciate any experience from the membership based on
      applying
      > the stripper techniques to larger boats. Anybody care to share
      ideas
      > and drawbacks?
      >
      > Thanks, JR Sloan
    • razopp
      J.R. Sloan, I too looked into building a strip boat in the past. The Glen-L.com website provided me with a lot of information. I have considered (and own
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 2, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        J.R. Sloan,

        I too looked into building a strip boat in the past. The Glen-L.com
        website provided me with a lot of information. I have considered
        (and own plans) of several of the boats on the glen-l site. His
        boats are traditionally plywood on frame, but I believe there are
        several people who have cold-molded these frames with wood planking.
        That might by a use for this kind of boat. There is a guy on that
        website who has built the Malahani outboard runabout with a plank on
        frame method. There is also a 22 foot sailboat called the Amigo that
        is being strip built. I am a big proponet of Glen-L as they have
        been very helpful with my projects in the past. Congratulations, on
        the great find.

        Robert



        --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "J. R. Sloan"
        <jr_sloan@m...> wrote:
        > I just stumbled on a large supply of free, salvaged douglas fir
        > planks in the 1' x 12" size, most in excess of 12 feet long. My
        tools
        > will let me reduce the pile to strips of any size I want, I think.
        >
        > For more comfort in my next decade, I'm thinking that a longer and
        > wider boat than the canoe I did last year is in order, with
        > correspondingly larger and thicker strips. I have in mind a 20'-
        22'
        > flat-bottomed sailboat, yet with the characteristics of one of our
        > canoe/kayak strippers: light, tough, resilient and home-built with
        > care and epoxy. My first impulse was to rig her with a schooner
        > setup, but more thought leans toward a simpler catboat rig. Most
        of
        > my trips will be sailing/fishing on the impoundments behind the
        dams
        > in the Pacific Northwest's Inland Empire, maybe a rare excursion
        into
        > Puget Sound or the Lower Columbia.
        >
        > I'd appreciate any experience from the membership based on applying
        > the stripper techniques to larger boats. Anybody care to share
        ideas
        > and drawbacks?
        >
        > Thanks, JR Sloan
      • J. R. Sloan
        ... on ... Sue & Ben-- Thanks for the invite! Won t be long I think. As for the douglas fir, it is more brittle than cedar, and will split along edges when
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 3, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, suetv123 <no_reply@y...>
          wrote:
          > JR,
          > That was a great find! And a good price too (free). Was wondering -
          > Is the douglas fir strong enough (yet not too brittle) to go thin
          on
          > the strips?

          Sue & Ben--
          Thanks for the invite! Won't be long I think.

          As for the douglas fir, it is more brittle than cedar, and will split
          along edges when bent, unless dampened (soaked is safer) and bent
          into place to dry before gluing. I've even considered making a
          steaming tube, just to try out the method.

          It is however, stiffer for its thickness, so I could use thinner
          strips than cedar. My idea for using it for a lighter boat recognizes
          that our particular method involves an epoxy/glass composite
          sandwich, with the wood in between as a "form", with the shell
          providing most of the strength.

          Of course, going to a bigger boat size may mean thicker strips
          (certainly would, if I was using stripped cedar). Hence my question
          for the membership: what would be an optimum thickness and width of a
          douglas fir strip, if its width started out as a 1-1/2 width sliced
          off a 2x12?

          JR
        • Richard Menz
          ... wrote: snip ... 22 ... You have just described one of Mr Bolgers most elegant designs, what he calls a Gold Plater . Wisp is an
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 4, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "J. R. Sloan"
            <jr_sloan@m...> wrote:
            snip
            > For more comfort in my next decade, I'm thinking that a longer and
            > wider boat than the canoe I did last year is in order, with
            > correspondingly larger and thicker strips. I have in mind a 20'-
            22'
            > flat-bottomed sailboat, yet with the characteristics of one of our
            > canoe/kayak strippers: light, tough, resilient and home-built with
            > care and epoxy. My first impulse was to rig her with a schooner
            > setup, but more thought leans toward a simpler catboat rig.

            You have just described one of Mr Bolgers most elegant designs, what
            he calls a "Gold Plater". Wisp is an unbearably elegant 20' flat
            bottomed decked sailing canoe with two bilge boards and an invisible
            rudder mounted through the hull. The design is the maximum boat you
            can conceivably cartop. It is supposed to be cold molded, but it
            appears everybody builds them as a stripper. You'd never get it
            launched without drawing a small crowd.
          • J. R. Sloan
            ... most elegant designs, what ... invisible ... Have you any references to people or sites where such a stripper might be viewed?? JR
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 7, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Menz"
              <paradigmhomes@h...> wrote:
              > --- In cedarstripcanoes@> You have just described one of Mr Bolgers
              most elegant designs, what
              > he calls a "Gold Plater". Wisp is an unbearably elegant 20' flat
              > bottomed decked sailing canoe with two bilge boards and an
              invisible
              > rudder mounted through the hull. The design is the maximum boat you
              > can conceivably cartop. It is supposed to be cold molded, but it
              > appears everybody builds them as a stripper. You'd never get it
              > launched without drawing a small crowd.

              Have you any references to people or sites where such a stripper
              might be viewed?? JR
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.