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Wood

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  • Mark
    In a related question. Where does everyone get the wood for their projects? I worked part time in a Home Depot in the lumber dept and I am well versed in their
    Message 1 of 28 , Jun 29, 2003
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      In a related question. Where does everyone get the wood for their
      projects? I worked part time in a Home Depot in the lumber dept and
      I am well versed in their selection (which is poor to say the
      least). But in their defense they are primarily in the home
      improvement business.
    • rmcelroy1954
      ... and ... Mark, I live in a small town in Nebraska but the local lumber yard was able to order 14 1x6 s of clear eastern red cedar. So I would suggest
      Message 2 of 28 , Jul 1, 2003
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        --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <sven3839@y...>
        wrote:
        > In a related question. Where does everyone get the wood for their
        > projects? I worked part time in a Home Depot in the lumber dept
        and
        > I am well versed in their selection (which is poor to say the
        > least). But in their defense they are primarily in the home
        > improvement business.

        Mark, I live in a small town in Nebraska but the local lumber yard
        was able to order 14' 1x6's of clear eastern red cedar. So I would
        suggest calling the local lumber yards, not the big corprate chains,
        they should be able to help.
        Good luck
        Ron McElroy
      • John Caldeira
        ... I buy my wood at Home Depot, but it takes at least several trips to several stores and a lot of digging through the stacks to find good color-matched
        Message 3 of 28 , Jul 2, 2003
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          --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <sven3839@y...> wrote:
          > In a related question. Where does everyone get the wood for their
          > projects? I worked part time in a Home Depot in the lumber dept and
          > I am well versed in their selection (which is poor to say the
          > least). But in their defense they are primarily in the home
          > improvement business.

          I buy my wood at Home Depot, but it takes at least several trips to
          several stores and a lot of digging through the stacks to find good
          color-matched cedar. Most of my wood is from 2x6 decking cedar,
          which I find tends to have fewer knots than the picked-over 3/4"
          boards.
          http://www.outdoorplace.org/paddling/HD%20checkout2.jpg

          John
          Dallas, Texas
          http://www.outdoorplace.org/paddling/Guillemot1.htm
        • Bruce C. Anderson
          Howdy John ... What is the thickness of the 2x6 decking??? Thanks See Ya Have Fun Bruce http://myweb.cableone.net/bcanderson/
          Message 4 of 28 , Jul 2, 2003
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            Howdy John

            > -----Original Message-----
            > Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Wood
            >
            > color-matched cedar. Most of my wood is from 2x6 decking cedar,

            What is the thickness of the 2x6 decking???

            Thanks

            See Ya

            Have Fun

            Bruce

            http://myweb.cableone.net/bcanderson/
          • Mark
            Dig through the pile!?!?!?!?! What and create a mess for the Home Depot guys to clean up.......?(evil grin on my face) Hadnt given the 2x6 s any thought. But
            Message 5 of 28 , Jul 2, 2003
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              Dig through the pile!?!?!?!?! What and create a mess for the Home
              Depot guys to clean up.......?(evil grin on my face) Hadnt given the
              2x6's any thought. But your right they are much clearer than the 1 x
              anythings. All jokes aside I hated closing at night in the lumber
              dept because we had to flat stack all the lumber that had been thrown
              about by the customers during the day, what a mess.--- In
              cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "John Caldeira" <john@o...> wrote:
              > --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <sven3839@y...>
              wrote:
              > > In a related question. Where does everyone get the wood for their
              > > projects? I worked part time in a Home Depot in the lumber dept
              and
              > > I am well versed in their selection (which is poor to say the
              > > least). But in their defense they are primarily in the home
              > > improvement business.
              >
              > I buy my wood at Home Depot, but it takes at least several trips to
              > several stores and a lot of digging through the stacks to find good
              > color-matched cedar. Most of my wood is from 2x6 decking cedar,
              > which I find tends to have fewer knots than the picked-over 3/4"
              > boards.
              > http://www.outdoorplace.org/paddling/HD%20checkout2.jpg
              >
              > John
              > Dallas, Texas
              > http://www.outdoorplace.org/paddling/Guillemot1.htm
            • John Caldeira
              You have my sympathy for the mess that lumber customers leave. I try to be very neat about my digging, and learned how to tumble the 12 boards without
              Message 6 of 28 , Jul 3, 2003
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                You have my sympathy for the mess that lumber customers leave. I try
                to be very neat about my digging, and learned how to "tumble" the 12'
                boards without lifting them. Most frustating for me is to see good-
                looking lumber in the overhead bundles that I couldn't get to!


                Bruce, the 2 x 6 rough-cut decking boards are actually 5 3/4" by 1
                3/4". I first cut two 3/4" thick slices to get two 3/4" by 5 3/4"
                boards, and then cut strips from those.

                John


                --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <sven3839@y...> wrote:
                > Dig through the pile!?!?!?!?! What and create a mess for the Home
                > Depot guys to clean up.......?(evil grin on my face) Hadnt given
                the
                > 2x6's any thought. But your right they are much clearer than the 1
                x
                > anythings. All jokes aside I hated closing at night in the lumber
                > dept because we had to flat stack all the lumber that had been
                thrown
                > about by the customers during the day, what a mess.--- In
                > cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "John Caldeira" <john@o...> wrote:
                > > --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <sven3839@y...>
                > wrote:
                > > > In a related question. Where does everyone get the wood for
                their
                > > > projects? I worked part time in a Home Depot in the lumber dept
                > and
                > > > I am well versed in their selection (which is poor to say the
                > > > least). But in their defense they are primarily in the home
                > > > improvement business.
                > >
                > > I buy my wood at Home Depot, but it takes at least several trips
                to
                > > several stores and a lot of digging through the stacks to find
                good
                > > color-matched cedar. Most of my wood is from 2x6 decking cedar,
                > > which I find tends to have fewer knots than the picked-over 3/4"
                > > boards.
                > > http://www.outdoorplace.org/paddling/HD%20checkout2.jpg
                > >
                > > John
                > > Dallas, Texas
                > > http://www.outdoorplace.org/paddling/Guillemot1.htm
              • Bruce C. Anderson
                Howdy John ... AFTER I sent the message I realized how DUMB the question was. So I slapped my self in the forehead, and hoped nobody would notice that I asked
                Message 7 of 28 , Jul 3, 2003
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                  Howdy John

                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Wood
                  >
                  > Bruce, the 2 x 6 rough-cut decking boards are actually 5 3/4" by 1
                  > 3/4". I first cut two 3/4" thick slices to get two 3/4" by 5 3/4"
                  > boards, and then cut strips from those.

                  AFTER I sent the message I realized how DUMB the question was. So I
                  slapped my self in the forehead, and hoped nobody would notice that I
                  asked how thick a 2x6 was :)

                  Your answer was not only informative but gracious and courteous

                  THANK YOU :)

                  See Ya

                  Have Fun

                  Bruce

                  http://myweb.cableone.net/bcanderson/
                • John Caldeira
                  Bruce, it s not a dumb question. The actual dimensions of finished and rough cut lumber are different enough from their nominal dimensions that I sometimes
                  Message 8 of 28 , Jul 3, 2003
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                    Bruce, it's not a dumb question. The actual dimensions of finished
                    and rough cut lumber are different enough from their nominal
                    dimensions that I sometimes find a tape measure in a store to check!

                    The 2x6 lumber is usually cheaper than the 3/4" stock too, on a per-
                    strip basis.

                    John (building a Redfish Spring Run kayak)


                    --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce C. Anderson"
                    <bcanderson@c...> wrote:
                    > Howdy John
                    >
                    > > -----Original Message-----
                    > > Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Wood
                    > >
                    > > Bruce, the 2 x 6 rough-cut decking boards are actually 5 3/4" by
                    1
                    > > 3/4". I first cut two 3/4" thick slices to get two 3/4" by 5
                    3/4"
                    > > boards, and then cut strips from those.
                    >
                    > AFTER I sent the message I realized how DUMB the question was. So I
                    > slapped my self in the forehead, and hoped nobody would notice that
                    I
                    > asked how thick a 2x6 was :)
                    >
                    > Your answer was not only informative but gracious and courteous
                    >
                    > THANK YOU :)
                    >
                    > See Ya
                    >
                    > Have Fun
                    >
                    > Bruce
                    >
                    > http://myweb.cableone.net/bcanderson/
                  • J. R. Sloan
                    ... We tend to get hung up on the wood we use (the site does call itself CEDARstripcanoes, after all). But you can make a canoe using the epoxy/glass method
                    Message 9 of 28 , Jul 5, 2003
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                      > --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <sven3839@y...>
                      wrote:
                      > > In a related question. Where does everyone get the wood for their
                      > > projects?

                      We tend to get hung up on the wood we use (the site does call itself
                      CEDARstripcanoes, after all). But you can make a canoe using the
                      epoxy/glass method most of us describe, out of ANY variety of wood
                      that will bend. Want a white canoe? use ash--super tough and really
                      bendy. Want a dark one? Trim your scrap walnut strips thinner and be
                      really careful going around the bendy parts.

                      We have a member/contributor with his own Brazil Yahoogroup
                      (canoeagem@yahoogroups.com or similar)who uses various types of woods
                      from down there. He sometimes has to order special cuts of the
                      various kinds of woods he uses.

                      Lots of canoes have been made of salvaged or recycled woods. My own
                      Sun of Liberty is what's left of a 25-year-old recycled redwood deck
                      that a neighbor and I replaced a couple of years ago, trimmed with
                      Mountain ash parts from a backyard pruning project.

                      There's a recent article (the August 2003 issue of Popular
                      Woodworking Magazine), entitled "Lusting for Lumber" that goes into
                      the subject from a "found wood" point of view. They suggest going
                      out and finding a local sawyer to reduce your own personal log into
                      boards you can use. I've actually tried this, and it's a lot more
                      fun and easier than you might think.

                      One way to go is with a kit: that way you get cedar, matched and
                      already dimensioned. More adventurous is to go to the Home
                      Improvement Center. Still more involved is collecting or salvaging,
                      and finally, the REAL boatbuilding pioneer goes and gets his own
                      trees. The choice might depend on what aspect of this craft is most
                      important to you: the challenge of being on the water on your own
                      boat, or the challenge of getting the boat together in the first
                      place.

                      Best regards, JR
                    • Dan
                      I don t know what you found, but I recently cam across some websites where you can buy 20 strips. It s probably more expensive this way but it s easier if you
                      Message 10 of 28 , Jul 22, 2003
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                        I don't know what you found, but I recently cam across some websites
                        where you can buy 20' strips. It's probably more expensive this way
                        but it's easier if you don't have the woodworking tools necessary to
                        cut the strips yourself. Like me :) Here they are:
                        http://www.whitecedar.com/Canoe.htm
                        http://www.ravencommunity.com/canoekayakstrip2.htm
                        I thought I had found more, if you are interested in any others I
                        may end up finding let me know and I'll send them on.

                        Dan


                        --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <sven3839@y...>
                        wrote:
                        > In a related question. Where does everyone get the wood for their
                        > projects? I worked part time in a Home Depot in the lumber dept
                        and
                        > I am well versed in their selection (which is poor to say the
                        > least). But in their defense they are primarily in the home
                        > improvement business.
                      • pls1911
                        Like John, most of my wood comes from Home Depot. I find the cleanest dark cedar among 2x3 or 2x4 cedar fencing cross tie stock. Most is cut from 1x whatever
                        Message 11 of 28 , Jul 26, 2003
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                          Like John, most of my wood comes from Home Depot.
                          I find the cleanest dark cedar among 2x3 or 2x4 cedar fencing cross tie stock. Most is cut from "1x whatever" is cleanest and colored attractively.

                          However, without question the best source for the finest woods in the DFW area is Lee Roy Jordan's... You'll pay the price, but you can get clear heart redwood, clear cedar in any length you want, and they'll be happy to let you select your wood for color as well.
                          Clear heart redwood is pricey, less dense and more brittle than cedar, but when used for contrast on decks, it's is very pretty, and two 1x10 x 16' boards gives lots of strips. It's worth thr trip just to see the wood. They have a whole warehouse down the road with only cedar... it smells great too.
                          Another alternate source is redwood lawn furniture. When you can find it, folks will normally be glad to let you haul it off. A 4x8 table and benches made from 2x4 stock provides LOTS of wood.

                          Paul



                          --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <sven3839@y...> wrote:
                          > In a related question. Where does everyone get the wood for their
                          > projects? I worked part time in a Home Depot in the lumber dept and
                          > I am well versed in their selection (which is poor to say the
                          > least). But in their defense they are primarily in the home
                          > improvement business.
                        • pls1911
                          Like John, most of my wood comes from Home Depot. I find the cleanest dark cedar among 2x3 or 2x4 cedar fencing cross tie stock. Most is cut from 1x whatever
                          Message 12 of 28 , Jul 26, 2003
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                            Like John, most of my wood comes from Home Depot.
                            I find the cleanest dark cedar among 2x3 or 2x4 cedar fencing cross tie stock. Most is cut from "1x whatever" is cleanest and colored attractively.

                            However, without question the best source for the finest woods in the DFW area is Lee Roy Jordan's... You'll pay the price, but you can get clear heart redwood, clear cedar in any length you want, and they'll be happy to let you select your wood for color as well.
                            Clear heart redwood is pricey, less dense and more brittle than cedar, but when used for contrast on decks, it's is very pretty, and two 1x10 x 16' boards gives lots of strips. It's worth thr trip just to see the wood. They have a whole warehouse down the road with only cedar... it smells great too.
                            Another alternate source is redwood lawn furniture. When you can find it, folks will normally be glad to let you haul it off. A 4x8 table and benches made from 2x4 stock provides LOTS of wood.

                            Paul



                            --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <sven3839@y...> wrote:
                            > In a related question. Where does everyone get the wood for their
                            > projects? I worked part time in a Home Depot in the lumber dept and
                            > I am well versed in their selection (which is poor to say the
                            > least). But in their defense they are primarily in the home
                            > improvement business.
                          • naesllun
                            I have a question. Do the strips have to be beveled or tongue and grooved? When my father and I built a redwood canoe, I don t remember if we did that or let
                            Message 13 of 28 , Jul 28, 2003
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                              I have a question. Do the strips have to be beveled or tongue and
                              grooved? When my father and I built a redwood canoe, I don't
                              remember if we did that or let alone sand it. I guess that he had
                              to, it was a long time ago for me to remember. I do belived that he
                              purchased the wood as strips too. Where from? I beleive a local
                              sawer. They are tough to find these days.

                              My tools are limited as well. So is space. Hell, my wife probably
                              won't like my ideas for the garage! Gotta start somewhere though!

                              Does anyone have ideas on making a table saw out of a circular saw?
                              Can I turn it upside down and bole it to the bottom of some plywood
                              somehow?
                            • pjjgirard
                              ... saw? ... plywood ... ******************* This can be (and has been) done. Drill holes in the skil saw table (the small table attached to the skil saw) and
                              Message 14 of 28 , Aug 5, 2003
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                                > Does anyone have ideas on making a table saw out of a circular
                                saw?
                                > Can I turn it upside down and bole it to the bottom of some
                                plywood
                                > somehow?

                                *******************

                                This can be (and has been) done. Drill holes in the skil saw table
                                (the small table attached to the skil saw) and bolt them, with
                                flathead bolts to your home made plywood table. Your fence will
                                have to be measured off the blade and tightly clamped in place and
                                would only be practical for cutting a large amount of material all
                                of the same size. Keeping the circular saw running while you are
                                cutting will be problematic as well. You'd probably be better off
                                just attaching your saw blade to an old electric motor and building
                                a table over that.

                                You could spend more time on getting this right than it will take to
                                build the canoe. I'd suggest keeping an eye on the want-adds for a
                                used table saw. Get something that's made for the work you are
                                doing.

                                P.
                              • pjjgirard
                                ... websites ... way ... to ... ****************** The last few years I ve spent a fair amount of time building birchbark canoes, harvesting the bark and
                                Message 15 of 28 , Aug 5, 2003
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                                  > I don't know what you found, but I recently cam across some
                                  websites
                                  > where you can buy 20' strips. It's probably more expensive this
                                  way
                                  > but it's easier if you don't have the woodworking tools necessary
                                  to
                                  > cut the strips yourself. Like me :) Here they are:
                                  > http://www.whitecedar.com/Canoe.htm
                                  > http://www.ravencommunity.com/canoekayakstrip2.htm
                                  > I thought I had found more, if you are interested in any others I
                                  > may end up finding let me know and I'll send them on.
                                  >
                                  > Dan
                                  ******************

                                  The last few years I've spent a fair amount of time building
                                  birchbark canoes, harvesting the bark and reeving the rib and
                                  gunnwale material out in the woods. I think I've finally got that
                                  out of my system, but it got me to thinking. Has anyone on the list
                                  ever reeved strips for building strip canoes. They'd still have to
                                  be machined to size, but the extra strength, from following the wood
                                  grain, would probably be considerable.

                                  P.
                                • John Caldeira
                                  Exactly, build a solid table and mount the circular saw upside down underneath. I cut HUGE amounts of wood like this as a Peace Corps volunteer. A photo of
                                  Message 16 of 28 , Aug 5, 2003
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                                    Exactly, build a solid table and mount the circular saw upside down
                                    underneath. I cut HUGE amounts of wood like this as a Peace Corps
                                    volunteer. A photo of my table is on the middle of this page:
                                    http://outdoorplace.org/beekeeping/peace.htm

                                    Circular saws are not intended for as continuous use as table saws,
                                    and they can overheat and burn out if not allowed to rest every 10 or
                                    15 minutes.

                                    I built my table to allow easy blade height adjustment. Drywall
                                    screws are ideal for setting up fences, jigs and featherboards It
                                    takes a little time to set up, but I found this table very effective
                                    where I had to do many same-size pieces.

                                    John


                                    --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "pjjgirard" <pjjgirard@y...>
                                    wrote:
                                    > > Does anyone have ideas on making a table saw out of a circular
                                    > saw?
                                    > > Can I turn it upside down and bole it to the bottom of some
                                    > plywood
                                    > > somehow?
                                  • buddydog7777
                                    you sound like i sound everytime i see a need for another tool. what i have learned thus far is to just go out and buy a good quality tool, like a tablesaw,
                                    Message 17 of 28 , Aug 5, 2003
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                                      you sound like i sound everytime i see a need for another tool.
                                      what i have learned thus far is to just go out and buy a good quality tool, like a
                                      tablesaw, and be done with it. the benefits of buying the actual tools far
                                      outweigh the "fooling around" i have done trying to juryrig something for less
                                      money. I finally opted for a "real" table saw and will NEVER regret the choice.
                                      i have a quality saw, great fence,, good table and it makes like so much
                                      easier. You can find used tools(some of us retire or give up) in ads and at
                                      auctions---just beware of junk. Good luck !
                                    • Snull37@cs.com
                                      Message 18 of 28 , Aug 5, 2003
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                                        I want one of those shop smiths! my buddy has had one for like 15 years and still gets tons of use out of it! need a bigger place....or much pleading with the little lady."buddydog7777" <buddydog7777@...> wrote:

                                        > you sound like i sound everytime i see a need for another tool.
                                        >what i have learned thus far is to just go out and buy a good quality tool, like a
                                        >tablesaw, and be done with it.nbsp; the benefits of buying the actual tools far
                                        >outweigh the quot;fooling aroundquot; i have done trying to juryrig something fornbsp; less
                                        >money.nbsp; I finally opted for a quot;realquot; table saw and will NEVER regret the choice.
                                        >i have a quality saw, great fence,, good table and it makes like so much
                                        >easier.nbsp; You can find used tools(some of us retire or give up) in ads and at
                                        >auctions---just beware of junk.nbsp; Good luck !
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
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                                      • Snull37@cs.com
                                        yeah, i think I ll take the advice of you guys. thanks.
                                        Message 19 of 28 , Aug 5, 2003
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                                          yeah, i think I'll take the advice of you guys. thanks.

                                          as for looking up fiberglass suppliers, i haven't been able to get to it yet. sorry."pjjgirard" <pjjgirard@...> wrote:

                                          > gt; Does anyone have ideas on making a table saw out of a circular
                                          >saw?nbsp;
                                          >gt; Can I turn it upside down and bole it to the bottom of some
                                          >plywood
                                          >gt; somehow?
                                          >
                                          >*******************
                                          >
                                          >This can be (and has been) done.nbsp; Drill holes in the skil saw table
                                          >(the small table attached to the skil saw) and bolt them, with
                                          >flathead bolts to your home made plywood table.nbsp; Your fence will
                                          >have to be measured off the blade and tightly clamped in place and
                                          >would only be practical for cutting a large amount of material all
                                          >of the same size.nbsp; Keeping the circular saw running while you are
                                          >cutting will be problematic as well.nbsp; You'd probably be better off
                                          >just attaching your saw blade to an old electric motor and building
                                          >a table over that.nbsp;
                                          >
                                          >You could spend more time on getting this right than it will take to
                                          >build the canoe.nbsp; I'd suggest keeping an eye on the want-adds for a
                                          >used table saw.nbsp; Get something that's made for the work you are
                                          >doing.
                                          >
                                          >P.
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
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                                          >
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                                          >
                                        • J. R. Sloan
                                          P. said the following: The last few years I ve spent a fair amount of time building birchbark canoes, harvesting the bark and reeving the rib and gunnwale
                                          Message 20 of 28 , Aug 19, 2003
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                                            P. said the following:

                                            The last few years I've spent a fair amount of time building
                                            birchbark canoes, harvesting the bark and reeving the rib and
                                            gunnwale material out in the woods. I think I've finally got that
                                            out of my system, but it got me to thinking. Has anyone on the list
                                            ever reeved strips for building strip canoes. They'd still have to
                                            be machined to size, but the extra strength, from following the wood
                                            grain, would probably be considerable.
                                            > P.

                                            --Boy, I'm glad I didn't try to make my own boards on site in the
                                            woods. As it was, I did have some locally harvested (from my own
                                            back yard) Mountain Ash turned into boards, but both it and the
                                            redwood were made into longer pieces by scarfing smaller pieces
                                            together into 23-foot long boards, which became strips by passing
                                            them through a 7-1/2" thin-kerf blade on a 10" Tablesaw from Sears.
                                          • J. R. Sloan
                                            ... to it yet. sorry. pjjgirard
                                            Message 21 of 28 , Aug 19, 2003
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                                              --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, Snull37@c... wrote:
                                              > yeah, i think I'll take the advice of you guys. thanks.
                                              >
                                              > as for looking up fiberglass suppliers, i haven't been able to get
                                              to it yet. sorry."pjjgirard" <pjjgirard@y

                                              One place to look for wood and supplies: our files and our Database
                                              sections, right here on the site.
                                            • scott49carroll
                                              I am getting ready to buy the wood for the planking. For those of you who have already stripped a canoe, did you use kiln dried wood? The western red cedar at
                                              Message 22 of 28 , Sep 10, 2005
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                                                I am getting ready to buy the wood for the planking. For those of you
                                                who have already stripped a canoe, did you use kiln dried wood?

                                                The western red cedar at Dixiline was s4s and only measured 5/8".
                                                These would make awfully small strips...

                                                Thanks,
                                                Scott Carroll
                                              • OneSpecialDJ
                                                I can t answer about the Kiln dried part, but If I may a comment about the width of the wood. 5/8th of an inch is only 1/8 of an inch thinner than 3/4 s which
                                                Message 23 of 28 , Sep 11, 2005
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                                                  I can't answer about the Kiln dried part, but If I may a comment about the width of the wood. 5/8th of an inch is only 1/8 of an inch thinner than 3/4's which will make the strips thinner, however they will bend a lot easier. You will need more strips, but stucturally will be as solid if not more, than the 3/4 inch strips. Mainly because you will have more glue joints. It may be a tiny bit heavier, but I don't foresee any problems going with thinner strips.

                                                  I have used strips of varrying widths based on the availability of wood, and have used thinner strips around the curvy parts of my kayaks.

                                                  Good luck

                                                  scott49carroll <scott.jane@...> wrote:
                                                  I am getting ready to buy the wood for the planking. For those of you
                                                  who have already stripped a canoe, did you use kiln dried wood?

                                                  The western red cedar at Dixiline was s4s and only measured 5/8".
                                                  These would make awfully small strips...

                                                  Thanks,
                                                  Scott Carroll





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                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                • Bill
                                                  I m planning on building a strip canoe & was thinking of using a hard wood instead of cedar. Does anyone have experence using hardwoods? I like the idea of
                                                  Message 24 of 28 , Aug 25, 2012
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                                                    I'm planning on building a strip canoe & was thinking of using a hard wood instead of cedar. Does anyone have experence using hardwoods? I like the idea of having something more durable even if it adds some weight. Obvously I don't want a 150LB canoe...any input would be great.
                                                  • Rick Stein
                                                    Here s a chart of wood densities: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/weigt-wood-d_821.html Most hardwoods will, at a minimum, double the wood content weight of
                                                    Message 25 of 28 , Aug 25, 2012
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                                                      Here's a chart of wood densities:

                                                      http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/weigt-wood-d_821.html

                                                      Most hardwoods will, at a minimum, double the wood content weight of
                                                      your canoe. Even a softwood like pine will add 33% of material weight.

                                                      Rick

                                                      On 8/25/2012 11:07 AM, Bill wrote:
                                                      >
                                                      > I'm planning on building a strip canoe & was thinking of using a hard
                                                      > wood instead of cedar. Does anyone have experence using hardwoods? I
                                                      > like the idea of having something more durable even if it adds some
                                                      > weight. Obvously I don't want a 150LB canoe...any input would be great.
                                                      >
                                                      >



                                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                    • cbp704
                                                      I d have to say you re going in the wrong direction. If extra strength is wanted/needed, I d look at strategically placed applications of extra layers in the
                                                      Message 26 of 28 , Aug 25, 2012
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                                                        I'd have to say you're going in the wrong direction. If extra strength is wanted/needed, I'd look at strategically placed applications of extra layers in the fiberglass lay-up, believe you'd get much more "bang for the buck" that way.

                                                        For instance, my Merlin canoe is glassed with one layer of 4 oz. from stem to stern, inside and out. Then the football area -- only the floor area I shall occupy while in the boat -- has one layer of 6 oz. glass added inside and out. The result is a very stout hull that weighs 32 lbs. It's my fishing boat, that I use in shallow, rocky Texas Hill Country rivers and streams.
                                                        http://ngc704.home.comcast.net/~ngc704/merlin/

                                                        BTW, it's not at all "obvious to me that you don't want a 150 lb canoe" when you're asking about using hardwood. I think cedar is so commonly and routinely used for a whole host of very good reasons, strength-to-weight being not the least of them.

                                                        Cheers,
                                                        Kurt Maurer
                                                        League City, Texas
                                                        www.sawdustfactory.net

                                                        --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <mbartelswpco@...> wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        > I'm planning on building a strip canoe & was thinking of using a hard wood instead of cedar. Does anyone have experence using hardwoods? I like the idea of having something more durable even if it adds some weight. Obvously I don't want a 150LB canoe...any input would be great.
                                                        >
                                                      • Gerald Boucher
                                                        I built a cedar strip canoe and fiber glassed inside and out. It is very strong and weighs 65 lb. GerryB _____ From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                                                        Message 27 of 28 , Aug 25, 2012
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                                                          I built a cedar strip canoe and fiber glassed inside and out.
                                                          It is very strong and weighs 65 lb.

                                                          GerryB
                                                          _____

                                                          From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                                                          [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill
                                                          Sent: Saturday, August 25, 2012 12:08 PM
                                                          To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                                                          Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Wood


                                                          I'm planning on building a strip canoe & was thinking of using a hard wood
                                                          instead of cedar. Does anyone have experence using hardwoods? I like the
                                                          idea of having something more durable even if it adds some weight. Obvously
                                                          I don't want a 150LB canoe...any input would be great.



                                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                        • William Schuster
                                                          I really enjoy the light weight of my cedar strip canoe and would not consider using a heavy hardwood!   Just cut down a large northern white cedar. The logs
                                                          Message 28 of 28 , Aug 25, 2012
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                                                            I really enjoy the light weight of my cedar strip canoe and would not consider using a heavy hardwood!
                                                             
                                                            Just cut down a large northern white cedar. The logs are at the sawmill/drying unit and the first of two kayaks start this winter.
                                                             
                                                            Use softwoods.
                                                             
                                                            Schuster
                                                            Wisconsin


                                                            ________________________________
                                                            From: Bill <mbartelswpco@...>
                                                            To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                                                            Sent: Saturday, August 25, 2012 11:07 AM
                                                            Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Wood



                                                             

                                                            I'm planning on building a strip canoe & was thinking of using a hard wood instead of cedar. Does anyone have experence using hardwoods? I like the idea of having something more durable even if it adds some weight. Obvously I don't want a 150LB canoe...any input would be great.




                                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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