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[Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: First Strip Built Boat

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  • J. R. Sloan <jrsloan3@yahoo.com>
    ... I wanted to agree with Jon that staple-less method is more time-consuming. But it does give you a much more attractive finish at the end. Case in Point:
    Message 1 of 32 , Feb 21, 2003
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      --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, Jon <ssnvet637@y...> wrote:
      > I ended up using the inner tube "rubber bands" which I
      > cut out of old tubes from a truck tire company. They
      > were more than happy to get rid of them. Be sure to
      > wash them off before you start cutting them up. Also,
      > the inside had a white powdery substance that was
      > messy.
      >
      > I resolved the issue of the strips pulling away from
      > the forms by making "fingers" out of scrap plywood
      > which I used to push the strips into contact with the
      > form, then clamped to the form. I wrapped the edge of
      > the jig that contacted the strip with packing tape so
      > that it would not get glued to the strips with the
      > excess glue.
      >
      > If you are considering the stapless method, keep in
      > mind that this will result in a significant increase
      > in the amount of time for the project. I could only
      > set 2-3 strips at a time, then wait for the glue to
      > dry before continuing on. I suspect that two people
      > could strip a canoe in a day with the staple method.
      > Mine seemed like it took forever.
      >
      > Jon
      > ---
      I wanted to agree with Jon that staple-less method is more
      time-consuming. But it does give you a much more attractive finish at
      the end. Case in Point: Jon's own boat!
      JR
    • J. R. Sloan
      Sorry I took so long to get back to you, Hap, but if you look at my latest post, you ll understand why. I ve floated down the Verde (circa 1966) on innertubes
      Message 32 of 32 , Mar 19 9:54 AM
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        Sorry I took so long to get back to you, Hap, but if you look at my
        latest post, you'll understand why.
        I've floated down the Verde (circa 1966) on innertubes with a
        suspended ice chest for the beverages. I understand why you might
        have some reservations about shallow rocks on fiberglass bottoms. My
        et advice is just to slather on extra armor, and be prepared at
        season's end to sand and resurface. The Cedarstrip with FRG surface
        is both tough and resilient, and in the shorter sizes, as
        maneuverable as any.
        Regarding your previous question about shortening an already-
        assembled stripper, I have a couple of suggestions of where I might
        start: (1) I would firmly glas both inside and outside of the points
        where I wanted to do surgery. (2) I would triple-check that the
        profiles at those points exactly match for later assembly (3)I would
        then bring the two ends together (a) first with a layer of glass and
        epoxy on the outside so everything was fair, then (b) epoxy putty
        plus matching cedar strip butt strips on the inside to reestablish
        the hull's physical integrity.
        It might not be a pretty fix, but it would work if you could match
        the two cut edges after removing the middle section. In this case, I
        think "measure umpteen times, cut once" is the operative rule.
        > > Best regards, JR
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