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sh2-240 / Simeis 147 Ha Mosaic

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  • Jeff Armstrong
    Simeis 147 (also known as Sharpless 2-240 and the Spaghetti Nebula) is a supernova remnant in the constellations of Taurus and Auriga.  The nebulous area is
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 29, 2013
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      Simeis 147 (also known as Sharpless 2-240 and the Spaghetti Nebula) is a
      supernova remnant in the constellations of Taurus and Auriga.  The nebulous area
      is fairly large, with an apparent size covering around 3 degrees, and is
      approximately 3000(±350) light years away, and covers an area of around 41.9
      parsecs (137 ly(±25)), and is approximately 40,000 years old.

      There are a lot of great looking images on the web of this object and mine
      hardly compares.  Regardless I finally finished processing it and all-in-all ok
      with it considering each set of stacked subs consisted no more than 2hrs of
      data.  Obviously a lot of noise in the image but thought I also pulled out some
      nice details.

      This is a 11 frame Mosaic shot on 7 different nights.  It took several redo's to
      try and get the background levels as equal as I could before stitching it
      together. 


      The image covers an area 3.83 x 5.17 degrees.  To put this in perspective, the
      full moon viewed from earth is about 1⁄2 degree, or 30 arc minutes.

      http://astrob.in/40480/

      Jeff Armstrong

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ron Brant
      Well done Jeff! Ron ... From: Jeff Armstrong To: starlightxpress@yahoogroups.com ; ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com ; CelestronCGEM@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday,
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 29, 2013
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        Well done Jeff!
        Ron
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Jeff Armstrong
        To: starlightxpress@yahoogroups.com ; ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com ; CelestronCGEM@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, April 29, 2013 7:03 PM
        Subject: [ccd-newastro] sh2-240 / Simeis 147 Ha Mosaic



        Simeis 147 (also known as Sharpless 2-240 and the Spaghetti Nebula) is a
        supernova remnant in the constellations of Taurus and Auriga. The nebulous area
        is fairly large, with an apparent size covering around 3 degrees, and is
        approximately 3000(±350) light years away, and covers an area of around 41.9
        parsecs (137 ly(±25)), and is approximately 40,000 years old.

        There are a lot of great looking images on the web of this object and mine
        hardly compares. Regardless I finally finished processing it and all-in-all ok
        with it considering each set of stacked subs consisted no more than 2hrs of
        data. Obviously a lot of noise in the image but thought I also pulled out some
        nice details.

        This is a 11 frame Mosaic shot on 7 different nights. It took several redo's to
        try and get the background levels as equal as I could before stitching it
        together.

        The image covers an area 3.83 x 5.17 degrees. To put this in perspective, the
        full moon viewed from earth is about 1⁄2 degree, or 30 arc minutes.

        http://astrob.in/40480/

        Jeff Armstrong

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • waddington50
        Nice image, Jeff. These mosaics take a huge amount of work, and I admire you for doing it. I ve never had the patience... :-) Bruce W.
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 30, 2013
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          Nice image, Jeff. These mosaics take a huge amount of work, and I admire you for doing it. I've never had the patience... :-)

          Bruce W.

          --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Armstrong <army5@...> wrote:
          >
          > Simeis 147 (also known as Sharpless 2-240 and the Spaghetti Nebula) is a
          > supernova remnant in the constellations of Taurus and Auriga.  The nebulous area
          > is fairly large, with an apparent size covering around 3 degrees, and is
          > approximately 3000(±350) light years away, and covers an area of around 41.9
          > parsecs (137 ly(±25)), and is approximately 40,000 years old.
          >
          > There are a lot of great looking images on the web of this object and mine
          > hardly compares.  Regardless I finally finished processing it and all-in-all ok
          > with it considering each set of stacked subs consisted no more than 2hrs of
          > data.  Obviously a lot of noise in the image but thought I also pulled out some
          > nice details.
          >
          > This is a 11 frame Mosaic shot on 7 different nights.  It took several redo's to
          > try and get the background levels as equal as I could before stitching it
          > together. 
          >
          >
          > The image covers an area 3.83 x 5.17 degrees.  To put this in perspective, the
          > full moon viewed from earth is about 1⁄2 degree, or 30 arc minutes.
          >
          > http://astrob.in/40480/
          >
          > Jeff Armstrong
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Bernard Miller
          Jeff, 11 frames is a lot of work. Very nice result. Bernard From: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jeff
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 30, 2013
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            Jeff,



            11 frames is a lot of work. Very nice result.



            Bernard





            From: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jeff Armstrong
            Sent: Monday, April 29, 2013 7:03 PM
            To: starlightxpress@yahoogroups.com; ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com; CelestronCGEM@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [ccd-newastro] sh2-240 / Simeis 147 Ha Mosaic





            Simeis 147 (also known as Sharpless 2-240 and the Spaghetti Nebula) is a
            supernova remnant in the constellations of Taurus and Auriga. The nebulous area
            is fairly large, with an apparent size covering around 3 degrees, and is
            approximately 3000(±350) light years away, and covers an area of around 41.9
            parsecs (137 ly(±25)), and is approximately 40,000 years old.

            There are a lot of great looking images on the web of this object and mine
            hardly compares. Regardless I finally finished processing it and all-in-all ok
            with it considering each set of stacked subs consisted no more than 2hrs of
            data. Obviously a lot of noise in the image but thought I also pulled out some
            nice details.

            This is a 11 frame Mosaic shot on 7 different nights. It took several redo's to
            try and get the background levels as equal as I could before stitching it
            together.

            The image covers an area 3.83 x 5.17 degrees. To put this in perspective, the
            full moon viewed from earth is about 1⁄2 degree, or 30 arc minutes.

            http://astrob.in/40480/

            Jeff Armstrong

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Admilson
            Beaultiful, Jeff, especially considering the OSC used. Compliments.   Admilson ________________________________ From: Jeff Armstrong To:
            Message 5 of 10 , May 2 12:27 PM
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              Beaultiful, Jeff, especially considering the OSC used. Compliments.
               
              Admilson


              ________________________________
              From: Jeff Armstrong <army5@...>
              To: starlightxpress@yahoogroups.com; ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com; CelestronCGEM@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, April 30, 2013 4:03 AM
              Subject: [starlightxpress] sh2-240 / Simeis 147 Ha Mosaic


               

              Simeis 147 (also known as Sharpless 2-240 and the Spaghetti Nebula) is a
              supernova remnant in the constellations of Taurus and Auriga.  The nebulous area
              is fairly large, with an apparent size covering around 3 degrees, and is
              approximately 3000(±350) light years away, and covers an area of around 41.9
              parsecs (137 ly(±25)), and is approximately 40,000 years old.

              There are a lot of great looking images on the web of this object and mine
              hardly compares.  Regardless I finally finished processing it and all-in-all ok
              with it considering each set of stacked subs consisted no more than 2hrs of
              data.  Obviously a lot of noise in the image but thought I also pulled out some
              nice details.

              This is a 11 frame Mosaic shot on 7 different nights.  It took several redo's to
              try and get the background levels as equal as I could before stitching it
              together. 

              The image covers an area 3.83 x 5.17 degrees.  To put this in perspective, the
              full moon viewed from earth is about 1⁄2 degree, or 30 arc minutes.

              http://astrob.in/40480/

              Jeff Armstrong

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • stargazer66207
              Jeff, That s a wonderful mosaic!! One question: I also have a C-11 with HyperStar. I would like to know what method you use for focusing. Ron Abbott Land of
              Message 6 of 10 , May 3 4:18 PM
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                Jeff,
                That's a wonderful mosaic!!
                One question: I also have a C-11 with HyperStar. I would like to know what method you use for focusing.

                Ron Abbott
                Land of Oz Observatory
                http://www.astrolandofoz.com
              • Jeff Armstrong
                I have an astro zap dew shield and a bahtinov mask on the end. Jeff Armstrong Sent from my iPhone ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Message 7 of 10 , May 3 6:40 PM
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                  I have an astro zap dew shield and a bahtinov mask on the end.

                  Jeff Armstrong

                  Sent from my iPhone

                  On May 3, 2013, at 6:18 PM, "stargazer66207" <rnrse71@...> wrote:

                  > Jeff,
                  > That's a wonderful mosaic!!
                  > One question: I also have a C-11 with HyperStar. I would like to know what method you use for focusing.
                  >
                  > Ron Abbott
                  > Land of Oz Observatory
                  > http://www.astrolandofoz.com
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • stargazer66207
                  Jeff, I use exactly the same setup. Other questions: When examining the diffraction spike, do you magnify the image? Also, do you use any other info to achieve
                  Message 8 of 10 , May 4 11:15 AM
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                    Jeff,
                    I use exactly the same setup. Other questions: When examining the diffraction spike, do you magnify the image? Also, do you use any other info to achieve best focus other than the mask. Lastly, what mag. star do you usually use, and what exposure time. Just curious. I am always trying to improve my focus!!

                    Ron Abbott
                    Land of Oz Observatory
                    http://www.astrolandofoz.com
                  • Jeff Armstrong
                    I magnified the image in Maxim DL to 200% and set the Screen Stretch to Low.  I ve always used my eyes to center the spike the best I can. I usually pick the
                    Message 9 of 10 , May 4 4:05 PM
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                      I magnified the image in Maxim DL to 200% and set the Screen Stretch to Low. 
                      I've always used my eyes to center the spike the best I can.

                      I usually pick the brightest star I can find that is closest to the object and
                      in the Hand Controller database.  I think I used Capella on this one.  If I
                      recall I bumped the exposure up to 4-5 seconds because of the filter.  Without
                      the filter I would use 2sec.  Any less and the noise makes it difficult to make
                      out the diffraction spikes clearly.

                      Jeff Armstrong




                      ________________________________
                      From: stargazer66207 <rnrse71@...>
                      To: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Sat, May 4, 2013 1:15:20 PM
                      Subject: [ccd-newastro] Re: sh2-240 / Simeis 147 Ha Mosaic

                       
                      Jeff,
                      I use exactly the same setup. Other questions: When examining the diffraction
                      spike, do you magnify the image? Also, do you use any other info to achieve best
                      focus other than the mask. Lastly, what mag. star do you usually use, and what
                      exposure time. Just curious. I am always trying to improve my focus!!

                      Ron Abbott
                      Land of Oz Observatory
                      http://www.astrolandofoz.com




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • stargazer66207
                      Jeff, Thanks for the input. Sounds like we are doing about the same thing. I, too use 200X to scrutinize the diffraction spikes. When I have it as close as I
                      Message 10 of 10 , May 5 11:18 AM
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                        Jeff,
                        Thanks for the input. Sounds like we are doing about the same thing.
                        I, too use 200X to scrutinize the diffraction spikes. When I have it as close as I can visually, I also use the "Display Large Statistics" in Maxim DL to check the FWHM number, and then try to "tweak" the number down a little lower if possible. Focusing at f/2 is really touchy (and tough!).

                        Ron Abbott
                        Land of Oz Observatory
                        http://www.astrolandofoz.com

                        --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Armstrong <army5@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I magnified the image in Maxim DL to 200% and set the Screen Stretch to Low. 
                        > I've always used my eyes to center the spike the best I can.
                        >
                        > I usually pick the brightest star I can find that is closest to the object and
                        > in the Hand Controller database.  I think I used Capella on this one.  If I
                        > recall I bumped the exposure up to 4-5 seconds because of the filter.  Without
                        > the filter I would use 2sec.  Any less and the noise makes it difficult to make
                        > out the diffraction spikes clearly.
                        >
                        > Jeff Armstrong
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        > From: stargazer66207 <rnrse71@...>
                        > To: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Sat, May 4, 2013 1:15:20 PM
                        > Subject: [ccd-newastro] Re: sh2-240 / Simeis 147 Ha Mosaic
                        >
                        >  
                        > Jeff,
                        > I use exactly the same setup. Other questions: When examining the diffraction
                        > spike, do you magnify the image? Also, do you use any other info to achieve best
                        > focus other than the mask. Lastly, what mag. star do you usually use, and what
                        > exposure time. Just curious. I am always trying to improve my focus!!
                        >
                        > Ron Abbott
                        > Land of Oz Observatory
                        > http://www.astrolandofoz.com
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
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