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Re: Definition of a Robotic Mount

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  • photobookie
    So this make it sound like the A/P mounts are even more robotic than the Paramount since no Park or Home feature is required if the power goes out and then
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 5, 2011
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      So this make it sound like the A/P mounts are even more robotic than the Paramount since no Park or Home feature is required if the power goes out and then resumed. Is this correct?

      --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, Mike Dodd <mike@...> wrote:
      >
      > Rex wrote:
      > > I think the only difference that matters in this context is that
      > > robotic systems can self recover and home themselves after a power
      > > loss with only software commands, many mounts require someone to
      > > allign the mount to a known position after power is lost.
      >
      > Well, the AP1200 automatically remembers where it was pointing just
      > before power is removed. All you need to do to resume is turn on the
      > power. No park is required, nor is a realignment or a "home" procedure.
      > As long as the scope hasn't been manually moved during the power-off
      > period, you just power-up and issue your first GOTO of the evening. This
      > is true no matter how power is shut off -- with the switch or due to a
      > power failure.
      >
      > I've done this dozens of times with my AP1200.
      >
      > Does this qualify the AP1200 as a "robotic" mount?
      >
      > --
      > Mike
      >
      > Mike Dodd
      > http://astronomy.mdodd.com
      > Louisa County, Virginia USA N37.58.23 W77.56.24
      >
    • Ron Wodaski
      Both mounts are robotic, in the sense that they can be used remotely. Each offers useful features, but they are different. One person might only consider the
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 5, 2011
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        Both mounts are robotic, in the sense that they can be used remotely. Each offers useful features, but they are different. One person might only consider the Paramount because of the built-in homing. Another might choose the AP because of the hand controller.

        it comes down to what do you want to do with the mount?

        Ron Wodaski



        On Jul 5, 2011, at 12:04 PM, photobookie wrote:

        >
        > So this make it sound like the A/P mounts are even more robotic than the Paramount since no Park or Home feature is required if the power goes out and then resumed. Is this correct?
        >
        > --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, Mike Dodd <mike@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> Rex wrote:
        >>> I think the only difference that matters in this context is that
        >>> robotic systems can self recover and home themselves after a power
        >>> loss with only software commands, many mounts require someone to
        >>> allign the mount to a known position after power is lost.
        >>
        >> Well, the AP1200 automatically remembers where it was pointing just
        >> before power is removed. All you need to do to resume is turn on the
        >> power. No park is required, nor is a realignment or a "home" procedure.
        >> As long as the scope hasn't been manually moved during the power-off
        >> period, you just power-up and issue your first GOTO of the evening. This
        >> is true no matter how power is shut off -- with the switch or due to a
        >> power failure.
        >>
        >> I've done this dozens of times with my AP1200.
        >>
        >> Does this qualify the AP1200 as a "robotic" mount?
        >>
        >> --
        >> Mike
        >>
        >> Mike Dodd
        >> http://astronomy.mdodd.com
        >> Louisa County, Virginia USA N37.58.23 W77.56.24
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Mike Dodd
        ... Yes. I speculate that the AP-1200 continuously saves its pointing data plus date/time in RAM or Flash memory, but I don t know for sure. I do know that
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 5, 2011
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          photobookie wrote:
          > So this make it sound like the A/P mounts are even more robotic than
          > the Paramount since no Park or Home feature is required if the power
          > goes out and then resumed. Is this correct?

          Yes.

          I speculate that the AP-1200 continuously saves its pointing data plus
          date/time in RAM or Flash memory, but I don't know for sure. I do know
          that when power is restored, a GOTO command finds the target from where
          the scope was pointing when power was shut off (as long as it wasn't
          moved while not powered).
          --
          Mike

          Mike Dodd
          http://astronomy.mdodd.com
          Louisa County, Virginia USA N37.58.23 W77.56.24
        • photobookie
          Hi Ron, What is the advantage of PME s built-in homing if the A/P mounts can resume pointing after a power outage? Thanks.
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 6, 2011
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            Hi Ron,

            What is the advantage of PME's built-in homing if the A/P mounts can resume pointing after a power outage? Thanks.

            --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, Ron Wodaski <yahoo@...> wrote:
            >
            > Both mounts are robotic, in the sense that they can be used remotely. Each offers useful features, but they are different. One person might only consider the Paramount because of the built-in homing. Another might choose the AP because of the hand controller.
            >
            > it comes down to what do you want to do with the mount?
            >
            > Ron Wodaski
            >
            >
            >
            > On Jul 5, 2011, at 12:04 PM, photobookie wrote:
            >
            > >
            > > So this make it sound like the A/P mounts are even more robotic than the Paramount since no Park or Home feature is required if the power goes out and then resumed. Is this correct?
            > >
            > > --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, Mike Dodd <mike@> wrote:
            > >>
            > >> Rex wrote:
            > >>> I think the only difference that matters in this context is that
            > >>> robotic systems can self recover and home themselves after a power
            > >>> loss with only software commands, many mounts require someone to
            > >>> allign the mount to a known position after power is lost.
            > >>
            > >> Well, the AP1200 automatically remembers where it was pointing just
            > >> before power is removed. All you need to do to resume is turn on the
            > >> power. No park is required, nor is a realignment or a "home" procedure.
            > >> As long as the scope hasn't been manually moved during the power-off
            > >> period, you just power-up and issue your first GOTO of the evening. This
            > >> is true no matter how power is shut off -- with the switch or due to a
            > >> power failure.
            > >>
            > >> I've done this dozens of times with my AP1200.
            > >>
            > >> Does this qualify the AP1200 as a "robotic" mount?
            > >>
            > >> --
            > >> Mike
            > >>
            > >> Mike Dodd
            > >> http://astronomy.mdodd.com
            > >> Louisa County, Virginia USA N37.58.23 W77.56.24
            > >>
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
          • Ron Wodaski
            There are still times when the mount can get lost, such as a software or operator error. Ron Wodaski
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 6, 2011
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              There are still times when the mount can get lost, such as a software or operator error.

              Ron Wodaski



              On Jul 6, 2011, at 6:40 AM, photobookie wrote:

              > Hi Ron,
              >
              > What is the advantage of PME's built-in homing if the A/P mounts can resume pointing after a power outage? Thanks.
              >
              > --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, Ron Wodaski <yahoo@...> wrote:
              >>
              >> Both mounts are robotic, in the sense that they can be used remotely. Each offers useful features, but they are different. One person might only consider the Paramount because of the built-in homing. Another might choose the AP because of the hand controller.
              >>
              >> it comes down to what do you want to do with the mount?
              >>
              >> Ron Wodaski
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> On Jul 5, 2011, at 12:04 PM, photobookie wrote:
              >>
              >>>
              >>> So this make it sound like the A/P mounts are even more robotic than the Paramount since no Park or Home feature is required if the power goes out and then resumed. Is this correct?
              >>>
              >>> --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, Mike Dodd <mike@> wrote:
              >>>>
              >>>> Rex wrote:
              >>>>> I think the only difference that matters in this context is that
              >>>>> robotic systems can self recover and home themselves after a power
              >>>>> loss with only software commands, many mounts require someone to
              >>>>> allign the mount to a known position after power is lost.
              >>>>
              >>>> Well, the AP1200 automatically remembers where it was pointing just
              >>>> before power is removed. All you need to do to resume is turn on the
              >>>> power. No park is required, nor is a realignment or a "home" procedure.
              >>>> As long as the scope hasn't been manually moved during the power-off
              >>>> period, you just power-up and issue your first GOTO of the evening. This
              >>>> is true no matter how power is shut off -- with the switch or due to a
              >>>> power failure.
              >>>>
              >>>> I've done this dozens of times with my AP1200.
              >>>>
              >>>> Does this qualify the AP1200 as a "robotic" mount?
              >>>>
              >>>> --
              >>>> Mike
              >>>>
              >>>> Mike Dodd
              >>>> http://astronomy.mdodd.com
              >>>> Louisa County, Virginia USA N37.58.23 W77.56.24
              >>>>
              >>>
              >>>
              >>>
              >>>
              >>> ------------------------------------
              >>>
              >>>
              >>>
              >>>
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • mark_manner_spot_obsrv
              To add to Ron s comment, having had a Paramount ME and an AP1200 side by side in my observatory for several years, I found that the AP from time to time would
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 6, 2011
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                To add to Ron's comment, having had a Paramount ME and an AP1200 side by side in my observatory for several years, I found that the AP from time to time would have a problem that required manual intervention, and being able to home it would have been very nice. Sometimes this was a result of a change in the planetarium software, sometimes operator error, sometimes a bump against the clutches. Since I always used a computer to control both, I ended up with 2 paramounts, and have found it a better solution for me. The AP1200 was a fine mount, but I like the seamless integration with the planetarium program I use (TheSky), the lack of clutches, and abiltity to home.
                Mark Manner
                spotastro.com


                --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, Ron Wodaski <yahoo@...> wrote:
                >
                > There are still times when the mount can get lost, such as a software or operator error.
                >
                > Ron Wodaski
                >
                >
                >
                > On Jul 6, 2011, at 6:40 AM, photobookie wrote:
                >
                > > Hi Ron,
                > >
                > > What is the advantage of PME's built-in homing if the A/P mounts can resume pointing after a power outage? Thanks.
                > >
                > > --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, Ron Wodaski <yahoo@> wrote:
                > >>
                > >> Both mounts are robotic, in the sense that they can be used remotely. Each offers useful features, but they are different. One person might only consider the Paramount because of the built-in homing. Another might choose the AP because of the hand controller.
                > >>
                > >> it comes down to what do you want to do with the mount?
                > >>
                > >> Ron Wodaski
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >> On Jul 5, 2011, at 12:04 PM, photobookie wrote:
                > >>
                > >>>
                > >>> So this make it sound like the A/P mounts are even more robotic than the Paramount since no Park or Home feature is required if the power goes out and then resumed. Is this correct?
                > >>>
                > >>> --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, Mike Dodd <mike@> wrote:
                > >>>>
                > >>>> Rex wrote:
                > >>>>> I think the only difference that matters in this context is that
                > >>>>> robotic systems can self recover and home themselves after a power
                > >>>>> loss with only software commands, many mounts require someone to
                > >>>>> allign the mount to a known position after power is lost.
                > >>>>
                > >>>> Well, the AP1200 automatically remembers where it was pointing just
                > >>>> before power is removed. All you need to do to resume is turn on the
                > >>>> power. No park is required, nor is a realignment or a "home" procedure.
                > >>>> As long as the scope hasn't been manually moved during the power-off
                > >>>> period, you just power-up and issue your first GOTO of the evening. This
                > >>>> is true no matter how power is shut off -- with the switch or due to a
                > >>>> power failure.
                > >>>>
                > >>>> I've done this dozens of times with my AP1200.
                > >>>>
                > >>>> Does this qualify the AP1200 as a "robotic" mount?
                > >>>>
                > >>>> --
                > >>>> Mike
                > >>>>
                > >>>> Mike Dodd
                > >>>> http://astronomy.mdodd.com
                > >>>> Louisa County, Virginia USA N37.58.23 W77.56.24
                > >>>>
                > >>>
                > >>>
                > >>>
                > >>>
                > >>> ------------------------------------
                > >>>
                > >>>
                > >>>
                > >>>
                > >>
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ------------------------------------
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
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