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Re: What am I missing toward the north?

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  • Mike Dodd
    ... That means all ... Sorry about omitting the latitude. it s about 38? and, sure enough, Polaris will be in the trees. I figure I ll be able to see it well
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 6, 2011
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      dmwmpd wrote:
      > Hi Mike,
      >
      > I'm not sure what Latitude you are at, but the whole USA continent
      > (not Alaska) would have Polaris at or below 45°.

      That means all
      > targets north of you will at least be available all night sometime
      > during the year. Your only worry would be to see Polaris to polar
      > align.

      Sorry about omitting the latitude. it's about 38? and, sure enough,
      Polaris will be in the trees. I figure I'll be able to see it well
      enough to polar-align the mount once (it'll be on a pier). Then I can
      drift-align.

      > I don't know of anyone who shoots "under" Polaris.

      That's encouraging; thanks.
      --
      Mike

      Mike Dodd
      Louisa County, Virginia USA
      http://astronomy.mdodd.com

      Louisa, Virginia USA N37° 58' 23" W77° 56' 24"
      Building a new observatory in 2011
    • mark_manner_spot_obsrv
      Hi Mike, for polar alignment you can use Tpoint if you have it. It works great to dial it in. Best, Mark Manner http://www.spotastro.com
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 6, 2011
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        Hi Mike, for polar alignment you can use Tpoint if you have it. It works great to dial it in.
        Best,

        Mark Manner
        http://www.spotastro.com



        --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, Mike Dodd <mike@...> wrote:
        >
        > dmwmpd wrote:
        > > Hi Mike,
        > >
        > > I'm not sure what Latitude you are at, but the whole USA continent
        > > (not Alaska) would have Polaris at or below 45°.
        >
        > That means all
        > > targets north of you will at least be available all night sometime
        > > during the year. Your only worry would be to see Polaris to polar
        > > align.
        >
        > Sorry about omitting the latitude. it's about 38? and, sure enough,
        > Polaris will be in the trees. I figure I'll be able to see it well
        > enough to polar-align the mount once (it'll be on a pier). Then I can
        > drift-align.
        >
        > > I don't know of anyone who shoots "under" Polaris.
        >
        > That's encouraging; thanks.
        > --
        > Mike
        >
        > Mike Dodd
        > Louisa County, Virginia USA
        > http://astronomy.mdodd.com
        >
        > Louisa, Virginia USA N37° 58' 23" W77° 56' 24"
        > Building a new observatory in 2011
        >
      • mark_manner_spot_obsrv
        Mike, I was looking at your website, and noticed you were going to automate your roof and if possible a lens covering for your scope in your new observatory.
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 6, 2011
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          Mike, I was looking at your website, and noticed you were going to automate your roof and if possible a lens covering for your scope in your new observatory. FWIW, if you still use your refractor, a great solution is to get a Flip-FLat. Not only does it make flat acquisition very easy, I almost like it as much as a remote operable lens cover. On the link below, scroll to the bottom.
          Good luck with your new observatory,
          Best,
          Mark

          http://www.spotastro.com/FlatMan.html



          --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Dodd" <mike@...> wrote:
          >
          > We just moved into our new house, and now I'm planning the new observatory. The area originally cleared by the builder doesn't give me the 30-degree horizon I want, so we're paying extra to have more trees removed.
          >
          > Yesterday's work turned out great -- between 19 and 24 degrees horizon from AZ 110 through AZ 250. The workers are coming back on Monday, but probably won't complete the circle before our money runs out. I think they can expand the low horizon to an arc from AZ 40 to AZ 280. North of these bearings, the horizon is mostly 45 degrees, but goes up to 60 degrees in a couple spots.
          >
          > At our old house, imaging was limited to between SE and SW due to nearby trees, so I'm sure I'll enjoy the expanded viewing area here. But I don't know anything about what's in the north. Looking at TheSky, I see some possibly interesting targets, but I'd like to hear from experienced imagers.
          >
          > If I have mostly a 45-degree horizon from AZ 280 through AZ 40, what kinds of cool targets will I be missing?
          >
          > Thanks in advance for any insights.
          >
          > Mike
          > http://astronomy.mdodd.com
          >
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