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Re: [ccd-newastro] Re: What CCD imaging equipment?

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  • Ron Wodaski
    I don t agree with that. the primary reason is that the large dynamic range of astronomic CCD cameras is very valuable in this circumstance. There isn t a lot
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 12, 2010
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      I don't agree with that. the primary reason is that the large dynamic range of astronomic CCD cameras is very valuable in this circumstance. There isn't a lot of brightness difference (because of the bright blue scatter) which leads to a low contrast image. A large dynamic range (which comes from a large well depth and lower read noise) will preserve smaller contrast differences and give you a better image.

      Ron Wodaski

      On Jun 11, 2010, at 8:20 AM, sandiegospaul wrote:

      > I suggest using a DSLR instead. CCD cameras for astronomy use are too sensitive to be much good in the daylight.
      >
      > --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, "Qamar" <qamar.uddin@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> Hello,
      >>
      >> I am familiar with using a CCD sensor based webcam (e.g. Philips SPC900NC) to image bright objects, like as the crescent moon after sunset.
      >>
      >> However, I would like to know what CCD imaging equipment would I need for day-time imaging of the moon, say 1-hour before sunset (over 18 deg elongation)?
      >>
      >> PS.
      >> I would like to do a test observation on Sunday 13 June 2010 from York (UK) and would appreciate an early response. :-)
      >>
      >> Regards,
      >>
      >> Qamar Uddin
      >>
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      > ------------------------------------
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    • ancient.sull
      I agree with Ron. I have done daytime imaging, particularly of objects too near the sun to image well through the air mass at dawn or dusk. I use the house
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 12, 2010
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        I agree with Ron. I have done daytime imaging, particularly of objects too near the sun to image well through the air mass at dawn or dusk. I use the "house trick" i.e. I have my scope set up where the sun has gone behind the peak of the roof but the object (say Venus or Mercury) is still visible over the roof. That way you won't fry anyting.

        http://www.ancientstarlight.com/Venus_Conjunctions.html

        Those images of Venus near conjunction when Venus was within 8-9 degrees of the sun but at Alts of 30 to 60 degrees with a webcam. If your plan is to image the very new moon tonight that might be a good trick.

        If you are not using a webcam, but using an astronomical CCD try an Ha filter if you have one. The Ha filter gives very good images of the moon.

        Drew S.

        --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, Ron Wodaski <yahoo@...> wrote:
        >
        > I don't agree with that. the primary reason is that the large dynamic range of astronomic CCD cameras is very valuable in this circumstance. There isn't a lot of brightness difference (because of the bright blue scatter) which leads to a low contrast image. A large dynamic range (which comes from a large well depth and lower read noise) will preserve smaller contrast differences and give you a better image.
        >
        > Ron Wodaski
        >
        > On Jun 11, 2010, at 8:20 AM, sandiegospaul wrote:
        >
        > > I suggest using a DSLR instead. CCD cameras for astronomy use are too sensitive to be much good in the daylight.
        > >
        > > --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, "Qamar" <qamar.uddin@> wrote:
        > >>
        > >> Hello,
        > >>
        > >> I am familiar with using a CCD sensor based webcam (e.g. Philips SPC900NC) to image bright objects, like as the crescent moon after sunset.
        > >>
        > >> However, I would like to know what CCD imaging equipment would I need for day-time imaging of the moon, say 1-hour before sunset (over 18 deg elongation)?
        > >>
        > >> PS.
        > >> I would like to do a test observation on Sunday 13 June 2010 from York (UK) and would appreciate an early response. :-)
        > >>
        > >> Regards,
        > >>
        > >> Qamar Uddin
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
      • Qamar Uddin
        Dear Terry, Thanks for your email/advice. I have found a red filter does improve the B&W image contrast (of a moon visible in daytime), but it also blocks
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 17, 2010
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          Dear Terry,

          Thanks for your email/advice.

          I have found a red filter does improve the B&W image contrast (of a moon visible in daytime), but it also blocks some of the whiteness from the lunar surface as well.

          Not sure if the same applies to a moon that is visible by telescope only?

          Regards,

          Qamar Uddin, York (UK)
          qamar.uddin@...
          --

          Re: What CCD imaging equipment?
          Posted by: "Terry Platt" tplatt@...-uk.net
          Thu Jun 10, 2010 12:38 pm (PDT)
          Hi Qamar,

          The same camera should be fine, but use a deep red filter to reduce the skylight.

          Regards,
          Terry
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