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Re: Lunar Imaging

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  • Paul K
    Jim, the exposure would depend on the camera, filter, and focal ratio of your system. I get saturated Moon shots with Astronomik 13nm FWHM filter at F/7 with
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 1, 2006
      Jim, the exposure would depend on the camera, filter, and focal ratio
      of your system.

      I get saturated Moon shots with Astronomik 13nm FWHM filter at F/7
      with ST10xme 0.01 second exposure. A much narrower filter, greater
      F/ratio, or less sensitive camera will improve the situation. You
      could also try using a quality neutral density filter to reduce the
      brightness, or a barlow to increase F/ratio.

      I recently shot a nearly full Moon at F/20 with the same filter/camera
      with good results.

      Regards,

      -Paul

      --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, "jfmiller7" <jfmiller7@...> wrote:
      >
      > I am looking for some guidelines surrounding lunar imaging. I would
      > suspect this is quite different form the deep space imaging and
      > processing referenced in great detail in both books. I was able to
      > get a number of decent images at .01 seconds with an HA filter. Some
      > areas were still overexposed, but if I cut the exposure shorter the
      > image became quite noisy. I notice some people stack multiple lunar
      or
      > planetary images. Is this done when the images are noisy, or all the
      > time?
      >
      > Appreciate pointing me in the right direction,
      >
      > Jim
      >
    • Jim Miller
      Thanks Tom. Are these multiple frames then stacked? does that increase contrast, or must they be stacked to get the signal strength high enough? regards. Jim
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 2, 2006
        Thanks Tom. Are these multiple frames then stacked? does that increase
        contrast, or must they be stacked to get the signal strength high enough?

        regards.

        Jim
        -----Original Message-----
        From: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com]On
        Behalf Of Tom Bash
        Sent: Wednesday, November 01, 2006 4:57 PM
        To: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [ccd-newastro] Re: Lunar Imaging


        Hi Jim,

        There is a Yahoo group that all the top lunar imagers post to and
        discuss imaging methods. It is called lunar-observing. Like all
        kinds of imaging, lunar imaging has seen amazing improvements in the
        recent past. The images posted on the lunar-observing group raise the
        bar in terms of resolution month after month, and some get featured on
        Chuck Wood's Lunar Photo Of the Day (www.LPOD.org) web site.

        The cameras used by most lunar imagers are B&W Firewire or USB 2.0
        video cameras like the Lumenera series. Because lunar exposure times
        are short, huge numbers of frames are recorded and processed as a
        video in software like RegiStax, which recently was upgraded to
        version 4 and features Multiple Alignment Point (MAP) processing.
        RegiStax will also work with 16 bit FITs files from an astro-CCD
        camera, so take as many images as you can and let it align, sort, and
        stack the images.

        Regards,
        Tom

        --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, "jfmiller7" <jfmiller7@...> wrote:
        >
        > I am looking for some guidelines surrounding lunar imaging. I would
        > suspect this is quite different form the deep space imaging and
        > processing referenced in great detail in both books. I was able to
        > get a number of decent images at .01 seconds with an HA filter. Some
        > areas were still overexposed, but if I cut the exposure shorter the
        > image became quite noisy. I notice some people stack multiple lunar
        or
        > planetary images. Is this done when the images are noisy, or all the
        > time?
        >
        > Appreciate pointing me in the right direction,
        >
        > Jim
        >






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jim Miller
        Ah thanks Ron, raising the white point solved the issue. Jim ... From: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Wodaski -
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 2, 2006
          Ah thanks Ron, raising the white point solved the issue.

          Jim
          -----Original Message-----
          From: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com]On
          Behalf Of Wodaski - Yahoo
          Sent: Wednesday, November 01, 2006 5:12 PM
          To: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [ccd-newastro] Lunar Imaging


          Are you sure that the images really were over-exposed? Check your
          contrast settings to make sure you are actually looking at the full
          range of available data. What looks burned out could just be clipped
          from a low white point setting.

          Ron Wodaski

          jfmiller7 wrote:
          > I am looking for some guidelines surrounding lunar imaging. I would
          > suspect this is quite different form the deep space imaging and
          > processing referenced in great detail in both books. I was able to
          > get a number of decent images at .01 seconds with an HA filter. Some
          > areas were still overexposed, but if I cut the exposure shorter the
          > image became quite noisy. I notice some people stack multiple lunar or
          > planetary images. Is this done when the images are noisy, or all the
          > time?
          >
          > Appreciate pointing me in the right direction,
          >
          > Jim
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >

          --

          Ron Wodaski
          New Astronomy Press
          http://www.newastro.com






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Stewart Waters
          Hi Jim, Are you using a webcam CCD device ? If so, you may find this helpful: http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Webcam_Moon_Imagers/ It is for anyone trying
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 3, 2006
            Hi Jim,
            Are you using a webcam CCD device ?

            If so, you may find this helpful:
            http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Webcam_Moon_Imagers/

            It is for anyone trying to obtain Lunar images using webcams.

            Hope that helps!

            Regards
            Stewart





            --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, "jfmiller7" <jfmiller7@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I am looking for some guidelines surrounding lunar imaging. I would
            > suspect this is quite different form the deep space imaging and
            > processing referenced in great detail in both books. I was able to
            > get a number of decent images at .01 seconds with an HA filter.
            Some
            > areas were still overexposed, but if I cut the exposure shorter the
            > image became quite noisy. I notice some people stack multiple lunar
            or
            > planetary images. Is this done when the images are noisy, or all
            the
            > time?
            >
            > Appreciate pointing me in the right direction,
            >
            > Jim
            >
          • Jim Miller
            I am not Stewart. I do a lot of deep space imaging with an SBIG ST-2000 and the other night I had a hole in the clouds around the moon so I gave it a go. I
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 3, 2006
              I am not Stewart. I do a lot of deep space imaging with an SBIG ST-2000 and
              the other night I had a hole in the clouds around the moon so I gave it a
              go. I will check out this site though as a web cam may be the ticket for
              lunar/planetary imaging.

              thank for the input

              Jim

              PS: some deep space pics can be found here:

              http://www.buytelescopes.com/gallery/gallery.asp?c=22873





              -----Original Message-----
              From: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com]On
              Behalf Of Stewart Waters
              Sent: Friday, November 03, 2006 2:37 PM
              To: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [ccd-newastro] Re: Lunar Imaging


              Hi Jim,
              Are you using a webcam CCD device ?

              If so, you may find this helpful:
              http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Webcam_Moon_Imagers/

              It is for anyone trying to obtain Lunar images using webcams.

              Hope that helps!

              Regards
              Stewart

              --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, "jfmiller7" <jfmiller7@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I am looking for some guidelines surrounding lunar imaging. I would
              > suspect this is quite different form the deep space imaging and
              > processing referenced in great detail in both books. I was able to
              > get a number of decent images at .01 seconds with an HA filter.
              Some
              > areas were still overexposed, but if I cut the exposure shorter the
              > image became quite noisy. I notice some people stack multiple lunar
              or
              > planetary images. Is this done when the images are noisy, or all
              the
              > time?
              >
              > Appreciate pointing me in the right direction,
              >
              > Jim
              >






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Jim Miller
              To Paul, Ron Stewart. and others that took the time to respond, thanks. Jim ... From: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com]On
              Message 6 of 10 , Nov 4, 2006
                To Paul, Ron Stewart. and others that took the time to respond, thanks.

                Jim
                -----Original Message-----
                From: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com]On
                Behalf Of Paul K
                Sent: Wednesday, November 01, 2006 6:13 PM
                To: ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [ccd-newastro] Re: Lunar Imaging


                Jim, the exposure would depend on the camera, filter, and focal ratio
                of your system.

                I get saturated Moon shots with Astronomik 13nm FWHM filter at F/7
                with ST10xme 0.01 second exposure. A much narrower filter, greater
                F/ratio, or less sensitive camera will improve the situation. You
                could also try using a quality neutral density filter to reduce the
                brightness, or a barlow to increase F/ratio.

                I recently shot a nearly full Moon at F/20 with the same filter/camera
                with good results.

                Regards,

                -Paul

                --- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, "jfmiller7" <jfmiller7@...> wrote:
                >
                > I am looking for some guidelines surrounding lunar imaging. I would
                > suspect this is quite different form the deep space imaging and
                > processing referenced in great detail in both books. I was able to
                > get a number of decent images at .01 seconds with an HA filter. Some
                > areas were still overexposed, but if I cut the exposure shorter the
                > image became quite noisy. I notice some people stack multiple lunar
                or
                > planetary images. Is this done when the images are noisy, or all the
                > time?
                >
                > Appreciate pointing me in the right direction,
                >
                > Jim
                >






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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