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Re: Camera frosting

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  • Bill Perry <wperry38@netscape.net>
    I had the same problem .I got tired of changeing the bag inside the camera. I drilled a1/4 npt hole in the back of the camera hooked up a hose to a regulator
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 1, 2003
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      I had the same problem .I got tired of changeing the bag inside the
      camera. I drilled a1/4 npt hole in the back of the camera hooked up
      a hose to a regulator on a bottle of argon gas. now I just fill it
      up every night no more frost.Bill fla.-


      -- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, "astroron2001 <r.d.brant@w...>"
      <r.d.brant@w...> wrote:
      > I have noticed that some CCD users are having a frosting problem
      with
      > their cameras. I thought I would pass along my technique for
      > (hopefully) avoiding this. (So far, it has).I live in San Diego
      where
      > our nightly humidity readings are typically 80-90% and it gets
      very
      > wet from dew. I went to a Packaging/Container store and purchased
      4
      > large dessicant bags. I took two large zip lock bags with me to
      > immediately seal them in. When I know that I won't be using the
      > camera for a week or longer, I remove the camera and place it in a
      > plastic tub with the camera and snap the lid on. My theory on this
      is
      > that if moisture can get into the camera, it can get out! When I
      take
      > the camera back out I put the bags back into the Zip lock bags.
      The
      > dessicant can be reactivated in an oven at 245 deg.F. for 16 hours.
      > I don't like leaving the oven on that long, so I built a "dry box"
      > that uses a light bulb. Anyone interested can send me a private
      email
      > and I'll forward a sketch of the box.
    • RONALD BRANT
      Yep, that will work too. I just didn t want more things hanging off the scope! Not to mention the gas bottle and more$. Ar ... From:
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 1, 2003
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        Yep, that will work too. I just didn't want more things hanging off the
        scope! Not to mention the gas bottle and more$.
        Ar
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <wperry38@...>
        To: <ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, January 01, 2003 5:00 PM
        Subject: [ccd-newastro] Re: Camera frosting


        > I had the same problem .I got tired of changeing the bag inside the
        > camera. I drilled a1/4 npt hole in the back of the camera hooked up
        > a hose to a regulator on a bottle of argon gas. now I just fill it
        > up every night no more frost.Bill fla.-
        >
        >
        > -- In ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com, "astroron2001 <r.d.brant@w...>"
        > <r.d.brant@w...> wrote:
        > > I have noticed that some CCD users are having a frosting problem
        > with
        > > their cameras. I thought I would pass along my technique for
        > > (hopefully) avoiding this. (So far, it has).I live in San Diego
        > where
        > > our nightly humidity readings are typically 80-90% and it gets
        > very
        > > wet from dew. I went to a Packaging/Container store and purchased
        > 4
        > > large dessicant bags. I took two large zip lock bags with me to
        > > immediately seal them in. When I know that I won't be using the
        > > camera for a week or longer, I remove the camera and place it in a
        > > plastic tub with the camera and snap the lid on. My theory on this
        > is
        > > that if moisture can get into the camera, it can get out! When I
        > take
        > > the camera back out I put the bags back into the Zip lock bags.
        > The
        > > dessicant can be reactivated in an oven at 245 deg.F. for 16 hours.
        > > I don't like leaving the oven on that long, so I built a "dry box"
        > > that uses a light bulb. Anyone interested can send me a private
        > email
        > > and I'll forward a sketch of the box.
        >
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > ccd-newastro-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
      • Bob
        If you haven t looked at the sbiguser list, there has been considerable discussion of an open hole is some SBIG cameras that has caused excessive frosting.
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 4, 2003
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          If you haven't looked at the sbiguser list, there has been considerable
          discussion of an open hole is some SBIG cameras that has caused excessive
          frosting. Aside from the frosting problem, the discussion has centered on
          dust from the desiccant plug. Mike Barber and Matt have stepped into this,
          and there are now app notes posted at SBIG's site on how to correct it. I
          don't have the URL Matt posted, but you might want to take a look at the
          issue and see if this might be the cause of your problems.

          Bob Genung

          At 21:49 01/01/2003 +0000, you wrote:
          >I have noticed that some CCD users are having a frosting problem with
          >their cameras. I thought I would pass along my technique for
          >(hopefully) avoiding this. (So far, it has).I live in San Diego where
          >our nightly humidity readings are typically 80-90% and it gets very
          >wet from dew. I went to a Packaging/Container store and purchased 4
          >large dessicant bags. I took two large zip lock bags with me to
          >immediately seal them in. When I know that I won't be using the
          >camera for a week or longer, I remove the camera and place it in a
          >plastic tub with the camera and snap the lid on. My theory on this is
          >that if moisture can get into the camera, it can get out! When I take
          >the camera back out I put the bags back into the Zip lock bags. The
          >dessicant can be reactivated in an oven at 245 deg.F. for 16 hours.
          >I don't like leaving the oven on that long, so I built a "dry box"
          >that uses a light bulb. Anyone interested can send me a private email
          >and I'll forward a sketch of the box.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • RONALD BRANT
          Thanks. I m using a416XTE and don t have a problem. Haven t yet anyway. That s why I posted this. The 416 doesn t have room for a dessicant plug. It seems to
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 4, 2003
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            Thanks. I'm using a416XTE and don't have a problem. Haven't yet anyway.
            That's why I posted this. The 416 doesn't have room for a dessicant plug. It
            seems to be sealed pretty good. I just wasn't taking any chances!!
            Ron
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Bob" <rgenung@...>
            To: <ccd-newastro@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Saturday, January 04, 2003 6:05 AM
            Subject: Re: [ccd-newastro] Camera frosting


            > If you haven't looked at the sbiguser list, there has been considerable
            > discussion of an open hole is some SBIG cameras that has caused excessive
            > frosting. Aside from the frosting problem, the discussion has centered on
            > dust from the desiccant plug. Mike Barber and Matt have stepped into
            this,
            > and there are now app notes posted at SBIG's site on how to correct it. I
            > don't have the URL Matt posted, but you might want to take a look at the
            > issue and see if this might be the cause of your problems.
            >
            > Bob Genung
            >
            > At 21:49 01/01/2003 +0000, you wrote:
            > >I have noticed that some CCD users are having a frosting problem with
            > >their cameras. I thought I would pass along my technique for
            > >(hopefully) avoiding this. (So far, it has).I live in San Diego where
            > >our nightly humidity readings are typically 80-90% and it gets very
            > >wet from dew. I went to a Packaging/Container store and purchased 4
            > >large dessicant bags. I took two large zip lock bags with me to
            > >immediately seal them in. When I know that I won't be using the
            > >camera for a week or longer, I remove the camera and place it in a
            > >plastic tub with the camera and snap the lid on. My theory on this is
            > >that if moisture can get into the camera, it can get out! When I take
            > >the camera back out I put the bags back into the Zip lock bags. The
            > >dessicant can be reactivated in an oven at 245 deg.F. for 16 hours.
            > >I don't like leaving the oven on that long, so I built a "dry box"
            > >that uses a light bulb. Anyone interested can send me a private email
            > >and I'll forward a sketch of the box.
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > ccd-newastro-unsubscribe@egroups.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
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