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Re: [ccaomlcaom] Results of survey on Consortium needs

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  • Librarian Jim Emdy
    the trouble seems to be in sending the document through word; i tried twice to add to files in the yahoo lcaom group and it was junk. if there is some way
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 20 3:26 PM
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      the trouble seems to be in sending the document through word; i tried twice to add to "files" in the yahoo lcaom group and it was junk.  if there is some way to transfer to a PDF file (i tried that through word and there was no PDF option).  it can be saved as a web page but it too does not translate with formatting.  we may just have to have hardcopy at the meeting and remote participants will have to suffer the bad formatting

      On Wed, Apr 20, 2011 at 2:06 PM, mahate rose <mahateis@...> wrote:
       

      Sorry about formatting on the bottom part -- I made school-specific responses into a word table and I think the table part doesn't transfer into the system. So it looks like a bunch of garbled mish-mash! I'll see what I can do to make it more readable.
      Mahate

      --- On Wed, 4/20/11, jamesemdy <librarian@...> wrote:

      From: jamesemdy <librarian@...>
      Subject: [ccaomlcaom] Results of survey on Consortium needs
      To: ccaomlcaom@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, April 20, 2011, 10:40 AM


       

      I will attempt to send this document to the "files" section. Reminder that the LCAOM meets in Baltimore in the evening on May 11th at 6:30. Remote phone access will be available. It is not too late to add your responses to this survey

      Consortium Survey Synopsis, General Results, and School-specific Responses

      SYNOPSIS

      Ultimately it was agreed among all responding libraries that a consortium is an attractive possibility, with interests in affordable access to expanded resources. Most respondents specifically noted a desire for access to more electronic information. Responses indicate that the specialized nature of their collections may be a bargaining point toward sharing with larger institutions. Important questions and considerations arose concerning how financial and human resources would be allocated to ensure that participating libraries contribute and benefit in proportional and feasible ways.

      GENERAL RESULTS

      Note: Five libraries responded. Responses from each of these libraries are directly quoted and paraphrased throughout the following reports on results. Please see graph for specific responses. I also narrowed down the wording in some answers in order to present focused information. I added an "additional thoughts" section to include relevant or helpful information that was not specific to the original survey questions.
      1. How library can benefit from consortial arrangement:
      • Online access to cost-effective and relevant journals, databases, e-books
      • Shared info lit training and tutorial modules
      • More efficient system management once initial creation/subscription/set-up is completed
      • Higher level of communication toward advancing individual and collective expertise and services.
      • Standardization of sharing and communication procedures.

      2. What library can offer larger group and institutions.
      • Sharing ILL of journal articles and books on a reciprocal basis.
      • Unique or specialized collections could be helpful to larger institutions with programs that encompass integrative medicine or traditional medicine
      • More experienced libraries can share experience with smaller and newer libraries

      3. How LCCAOM libraries can work together toward effective resource and services sharing.
      • Negotiating discounts to databases
      • Working together toward determining how costs would be shared to bring down current costs
      • Deciding how access would be managed.
      • Share URL's to each others' libraries
      • Libraries can consider what makes their library unique and contribute that to the group as a whole.
      • Libraries can create an online tutorial system for information literacy.
      • Libraries can construct a comprehensive mutual list of online free-access databases and sites according to subject.

      4. Challenges
      • Working out structuring the consortial systems and organization for maximum time efficiency for participating institutions, arranged in a way that takes into account library staffing and hours etc.
      • Catalog sharing would be inconvenient for those of us who've already paid for &/or constructed catalog
      • May be too resource and cost intensive for smaller libraries to try and create partnerships with larger institutions.
      • Time and human resources necessary to create such a large structure with so many variables and responsibilities. Might need to start small.
      • Shared catalogs is tough unless everyone switiches to one system.

      5. Additional Thoughts
      • Possibly LCCAOM libraries could negotiate with SCELC as a group, and maybe include libraries from outside California as well
      • We would need to confirm that enough of us were willing to put in the time and effort it would take to put together something like this, as well as keep it going. A wiki would likely be the simplest way to start.
      • NESA made a good point – they have strong administrative support, in addition to strong collections. Seems critical to get school administrations on board to support such an intensive project.
      • Finances: must decide how to divvy up costs depending on product, institution size, and participation
      • Services: must decide how to divvy up responsibility based on how much time and personnel needed, expertise, etc.
      • Must create and organize standard policies and procedures, upon agreement of the collective.
      • Must decide on board / authority body for collecting input and decision making
      • Even if consortium fails to actualize, creating a formalized support system for cataloging, collection development, taking a lead in promoting info lit within our institutions, and general training is worth doing, especially to support the smaller libraries.

      SCHOOL SPECIFIC RESPONSES
      How library can benefit from consortial arrangement What library can offer larger group
      and institutions. How LCCAOM libraries can work
      together toward effective resource
      and services sharing. Challenges Additional Thoughts
      Acupuncture & Massage College, Miami, FL: Daniele Perez-Venero, M.L.I.S. Online access to CAM journals and databases (e.g., "International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture"and also to have access to some CAM-specific databases such as AMED
      Yo San University: Andrea Anzalone, MLIS Cost-effective access to greater number of online resources (e.g., journal databases and e-books) Would consider offering ILL of journal articles and books on a reciprocal basis. Since our library is small, however, we would need to develop guidelines in this regard in order to enable ready access to materials for our students. negotiating discounts to databases would be the greatest benefit. Working out structuring the consortial systems and organization. Main concern as a part-time library manager is the time factor. In other words, though I would love to offer ILL to member libraries, for example, my time is very limited for additional tasks. This library is currently an affiliate member of SCELC (Statewide California Electronic Library Consortium, www.scelc.org ). Possibly LCCAOM libraries could negotiate with SCELC as a group? Maybe include libraries from outside California as well?
      New England School of Acupuncture: Jennifer Hartman, MSLIS Electronic resource sharing would probably be the easiest and most helpful route for a potential consortium. Databases, info lit & training modules, and cataloging structures could all be shared online, with less cumbersome oversight necessary once the initial creation/subscription/set-up was completed Our specialized collections could be helpful to larger institutions with programs that encompass integrative medicine or traditional medicine (med schools, anthro programs, etc.)

      … share some of our experience with smaller/newer libraries… Determining how costs would be shared. As long as it would bring down our current costs, we'd be fine carrying a larger fraction than some of the smaller schools. How access would be managed. Our patrons use usernames & passwords that we set up, and we're able to manage access to our resources ourselves (add/edit/delete accounts) and would want to retain that ability. Catalog sharing would be inconvenient for those of us who've already paid for &/or constructed catalogs. Large institutions already have robust systems in place for resource sharing and it may be too resource/cost intensive for us to try and create partnerships w/ them. Of course, that impression may be influenced by our being located near Boston, where the large universities can be particularly reluctant to partner w/ smaller institutions. Even if an actual LCAOM consortium fails to form, I think creating a formalized support system for cataloging, collection development, taking a lead in promoting info lit within our institutions, and general training is worth doing, especially to support the smaller libraries. NESA's fortunate to have support from the administration, a good sized staff, and a collection (both of resources and knowledge) that's been built up over decades, and we'd be happy to share some of our experience with smaller/newer libraries. Obviously a good deal of work would be required and we would need to confirm that enough of us were willing to put in the time and effort it would take to put together something like this, as well as keep it going. A wiki would likely be the simplest way to start.
      PCOM: Naomi Broering Alliances with larger colleges would be good Share URL's to each others' catalogs Expensive. Shared catalogs is tough unless everyone switiches to one system. We like ours CybertoolsforLibraries.
      AIMC Berkeley: Mahate Osborn Affordable access to large amounts of information and services that would otherwise not be available. A higher level of communication toward advancing individual and collective expertise and services. Standardization of sharing and communication procedures. Items from specialized and foreign language collections, sharing helpful information as requested by participants, contribute toward shared databases Libraries can:
      --consider what makes their library unique and contribute that to the group as a whole.
      --create comprehensive list of online free-access databases and sites according to subject.
      --become a singular network that offers national or global rather than solely local offerings.
      --create an online tutorial system for information literacy. Time and human resources necessary to create such a large structure with so many variables and responsibilities. Might need to start small.
      NESA made a good point – they have strong administrative support, in addition to strong collections. Seems critical to get school administrations on board to support such an intensive project. Finances: must decide how to divvy up costs depending on product, institution size, and participation
      Services: must decide how to divvy up responsibility based on how much time and personnel needed, expertise, etc.
      Policies and procedures: must decide upon agreement of the collective.
      Also must decide on governing / authority body for collecting input and decision making

      Compiled by Mahate Osborn 04/19/11


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