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RE: [ccaomlcaom] Consortium Considerations: Request for Information from Libraries

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    Hello, Mahate and LCCAOM Members: In response to your questions: 1. How you think your library can benefit from a consortial arrangement. I believe we would
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 30, 2011

      Hello, Mahate and LCCAOM Members:

       

      In response to your questions:

       

      1. How you think your library can benefit from a consortial arrangement.

       

      I believe we would most benefit from having access to a greater number of online resources (journal databases and e-books, for example), if cost-effective licensing agreements could be negotiated with vendors.  At present, our library is an affiliate member of SCELC (Statewide California Electronic Library Consortium, www.scelc.org ), which offers discounted subscriptions to a wide assortment of databases.  Perhaps it may be possible for LCCAOM libraries to negotiate with SCELC as a group (?)   I believe they have broadened their definition of “California libraries” to include libraries outside the state, and so perhaps it is worth investigating this possibility…

       


      2. What do you think your library can offer a larger group and institutions.

       

      We could consider offering ILL of journal articles and books on a reciprocal basis.  Since our library is small, however, we would need to develop guidelines in this regard in order to enable ready access to materials for our students.

       

       

      3. How you see LCCAOM libraries participating together toward effective resource and services sharing.

       

      As mentioned in question #1, negotiating discounts to databases would be the greatest benefit.

       


      4. Please also include your thoughts on what challenges you see in becoming part of a consortium.

       

      As you noted in your message, structuring the consortial systems and organization would have to be worked out.  My main concern as a part-time library manager is the time factor.  In other words, though I would love to offer ILL to member libraries, for example, my time is very limited for additional tasks.  But levels of involvement and membership are topics to explore further—and all in all I think being part of a consortium will have tremendous benefits.

       

       

      Andrea Anzalone, MLIS

      Library Manager

      Yo San University

       



       

      From: ccaomlcaom@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ccaomlcaom@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of maha
      Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 5:12 AM
      To: ccaomlcaom@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [ccaomlcaom] Consortium Considerations: Request for Information from Libraries

       

       

      LCCAOM Members,

      As part of our preparation for the upcoming meeting in Baltimore, we'd like to get a sense of what the needs are of smaller libraries (which most of us are) and how we can integrate those needs into a larger consortium framework.

      A consortium of participating libraries has the potential to enhance local access to a wide variety of print and electronic resources and services that would otherwise be beyond their individual means. This kind of sharing could allow collaboration toward development and standardization of many programs and systems that currently may be unwieldy, if offered at all, by smaller libraries with limited personnel.

      Some possibilities for sharing include:

      • Print resources sharing
      • Electronic resources sharing and licensing
      • Shared online catalogs
      • Online services such as information literacy modules
      • Enhanced interlibrary loan and document delivery systems
      • Standardized (or at least cooperative) cataloging structures
      • Eventual alliances with larger colleges and Universities with specialized collections
      • Mutual training programs

      Some issues that need to be addressed are how we will structure the consortial systems, programs, and organization, how many libraries will participate and how they will benefit,
      what the mission of the consortium will be, legal agreements, fee structures, and how long initial agreements will last. There are many options for all of the above, as to be determined by those libraries wishing to take part. Also to be determined will be most appropriate method of communication, decision making, and access to information (i.e., websites, daily e-lists, committees, etc). We also need to ascertain whether there are consortial options for small libraries that will be sustainable over time, both in human power and financial resources.

      Possibilities include informal or formal arrangements, and local or more extended networks, depending on the needs of participating libraries.

      I am writing today to recruit ideas from all individual libraries about the following four points:

      1. How you think your library can benefit from a consortial arrangement,
      2. What you think your library can offer a larger group and institutions, and
      3. How you see LCCAOM libraries participating together toward effective resource and services sharing.
      4. Please also include your thoughts on what challenges you see in becoming part of a consortium.

      I will consolidate all responses into a document for use at the meeting, so a timely response (by the end of March) would be appreciated.

      Thank you,

      Mahate Osborn, AIMC Berkeley Library Director

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