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Re: Catholic Questions Remmarried/Annulment/Non-baptized/RCIA

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  • Leanne Utter
    Even though you know your marriage was not a valid marriage, It has to be proven so in the eyes of the church. Marriage itself, is as I am sure you know, a
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 31, 2007
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      Even though you know your marriage was not a valid
      marriage, It has to be proven so in the eyes of the
      church. Marriage itself, is as I am sure you know, a
      very important sacramental. It would be not good, if
      you indeed did have a valid marriage, and the church
      allowed for the annulment to go through. Hence they
      handle such matters with extreme caution...and
      thorough investigation. Rightly so.



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    • Jon P
      Cathy, First of all, congrats on your decision to become Catholic. Since I converted through RCIA I ve found the Catholic faith to be very rich and rewarding.
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 1, 2007
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        Cathy,

        First of all, congrats on your decision to become Catholic. Since I
        converted through RCIA I've found the Catholic faith to be very rich
        and rewarding.

        One of the things about Catholicism is that every teaching and belief
        is rooted soundly in Holy Scripture and Holy Tradition. There's
        tremendous consistency across the centuries. Things may "evolve"
        slightly as we gain wisdom and understanding (ie. slavery was
        considered acceptable in Jesus' time and for over 17 centuries
        following) but the core beliefs remain the same.

        In the Gospels, Jesus is very clear about divorce (see Matt 19)... in
        fact, He is surprisingly specific on this issue compared to other
        sins. Jesus' teaching is in stark contrast to our modern society's
        view that you should get divorced if that's what would make you happy.

        Many protestant faiths recognize our society's changing views on
        marriage and allow divorce. The Catholic Church, however, must remain
        consistent with Scripture and Holy Tradition (divorce has never been
        permitted in the Catholic Church). So as is often the case, the
        Church finds itself supporting a position that is consistent with
        Christ but not necessarily very popular.

        The only "loophole" is the situation where a man and woman get
        legally "married" but are not Sacramentally married before God. This
        means that they were not properly prepared for the marriage, they
        didn't enter it of their own free will (matrimonial consent), etc.

        Every situation is unique and different, and it's a lot more
        complicated than just where you got married and who married you.
        There's a whole list of things that determine whether your first
        marriage was a Sacramental marriage. Your priest and/or tribunal
        representative could answer your questions in greater detail.

        Based on Christ's explicit teaching, the Church takes divorce VERY
        seriously - so they aren't likely to allow any "short cuts". They
        will probably not move as quickly as you'd like. That said, I think
        your odds of receiving an annulment are very good because you haven't
        been baptized.

        Your husband's first marriage is more likely to be the sticking
        point, especially if he was married in the Catholic Church (the
        Church is pretty careful to make sure marriages are properly
        administered to be valid). Of course, the status of his annulment
        will affect your ability to come into the Church (see Matt 19:9).

        These situations take a tremendous amount of patience. If all works
        out and you are able to join the Church, you'll see that the waiting
        is worth it. I've attended marriage convalidation ceremonies and they
        are amazingly beautiful and intimate... you can feel the presence of
        the Holy Spirit before the "bride and groom".

        Don't get too discouraged if you can't join the Church this year.
        This happened to two couples in my parish's RCIA program last year,
        but they are back this year and will join the Church at the Easter
        Vigil. The time passes quickly... and as I say, it's worth the wait.
        Keep attending RCIA... the journey contains it's own rewards
        independent of your ultimate goal.

        Good luck and God bless!

        Jon

        --- In catholicquestions@yahoogroups.com, "cathyp0413"
        <cathyp0402@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello, everyone. I would love to hear your thoughts and opinions
        on
        > my situation. So here goes: This is the second marriage for
        myself
        > and my husband. My husband is a cradle Catholic and I am not
        > baptized. I am currently in the RCIA program and we are both
        pursuing
        > annulments (we've talked with our priest and contacted our local
        > Tribunal). We hope to have our marriage convalidated if and when
        we
        > receive our annulments and I am accepted into the Church.
        >
        > My first marriage took place in a Protestant church, but only
        because
        > the pastor was a friend of his sister. I'm not positive, but I
        don't
        > believe that he is baptized, either.
        >
        > I'm confused--is a non-sacramental marriage automatically invalid?
        > Since I'm not baptized, why do I have to pursue an annulment?
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Cathy
        >
      • songtosing2002
        I m guessing that the church accepts it as a valid marriage because it was a legal marriage. great question. I m sure you will receive the annulments. the
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 3, 2007
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          I'm guessing that the church accepts it as a valid marriage because
          it was a legal marriage. great question. I'm sure you will receive
          the annulments. the Church wants and needs good active Catholics.
          hang in there and know one day this will all be behind you. get
          actively involved in your church. it will strengthen you beyond
          belief. I'm a cradle Catholic..for 46 years, and this is the first
          year I've been very active and taken my membership very seriously.
          not doing so in the past lead down some pretty dark roads. I'm so
          grateful to have the sacrament of reconciliation, I understand now
          how blessed we are to have this sacrament. we have a fantastic
          pastor, lives the gospel every moment, a true shepherd, to hear him
          say I am forgiven and to receive his encouragement has healed me and
          helped me move on.






          --- In catholicquestions@yahoogroups.com, "cathyp0413"
          <cathyp0402@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello, everyone. I would love to hear your thoughts and opinions
          on
          > my situation. So here goes: This is the second marriage for
          myself
          > and my husband. My husband is a cradle Catholic and I am not
          > baptized. I am currently in the RCIA program and we are both
          pursuing
          > annulments (we've talked with our priest and contacted our local
          > Tribunal). We hope to have our marriage convalidated if and when
          we
          > receive our annulments and I am accepted into the Church.
          >
          > My first marriage took place in a Protestant church, but only
          because
          > the pastor was a friend of his sister. I'm not positive, but I
          don't
          > believe that he is baptized, either.
          >
          > I'm confused--is a non-sacramental marriage automatically
          invalid?
          > Since I'm not baptized, why do I have to pursue an annulment?
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > Cathy
          >
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