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RE: [casting] buying Lego's in bulk

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  • John J Fleming
    ... http://shop.lego.com/en-US/Pick-A-Brick-11998, as has been pointed out. But, I wouldn t order the 2x4 bricks. I would go for the 2x8. They are the same
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 8, 2012
      > is there a supplier where i can buy lego's in bulk and the same size?

      http://shop.lego.com/en-US/Pick-A-Brick-11998, as has been pointed
      out. But, I wouldn't order the 2x4 bricks. I would go for the 2x8.
      They are the same price ($0.30) each, but you are getting twice as
      much. And with the stock of 2x4 you probably already have, you can
      use them for the short sides.

      They are the best for making molds. Re-useable, and infinitely
      re-configurable. I make some very complex looking molds with them.
      Molds need not be a rectangle. They are especially good for two-part
      molds. The Lego pips make the PERFECT alignment pips. :) The two
      halves almost snap together like the Lego. For the first few casts,
      you almost need no clamping. Well, depending on the size and volume
      of resin, of course.

      I don't Vaseline up the interior, I just live with the very slight
      leakage. It's easier to deal with than the cleanup of the Vaseline. :O


      Later...


      John Fleming
      MMI
    • Richard
      Not knowing a thing about Legos, I ve been looking at some of the photos of them on eBay as well as the pick a brick websites. I would like to get some of the
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 8, 2012
        Not knowing a thing about Legos, I've been looking at some of the photos of them on eBay as well as the pick a brick websites. I would like to get some of the bricks to use for casting dams but I hope someone on here can set me straight. What I see in the photos of say a 2x4 is 8 posts or protrusions on the top and only 3 holes on the bottom. Don't they make a brick with 8 holes on the bottom, so they can be plugged together??
        Richard in Vermont

        --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, John J Fleming <John@...> wrote:
        >
        > > is there a supplier where i can buy lego's in bulk and the same size?
        >
        > http://shop.lego.com/en-US/Pick-A-Brick-11998, as has been pointed
        > out. But, I wouldn't order the 2x4 bricks. I would go for the 2x8.
        > They are the same price ($0.30) each, but you are getting twice as
        > much. And with the stock of 2x4 you probably already have, you can
        > use them for the short sides.
        >
        > They are the best for making molds. Re-useable, and infinitely
        > re-configurable. I make some very complex looking molds with them.
        > Molds need not be a rectangle. They are especially good for two-part
        > molds. The Lego pips make the PERFECT alignment pips. :) The two
        > halves almost snap together like the Lego. For the first few casts,
        > you almost need no clamping. Well, depending on the size and volume
        > of resin, of course.
        >
        > I don't Vaseline up the interior, I just live with the very slight
        > leakage. It's easier to deal with than the cleanup of the Vaseline. :O
        >
        >
        > Later...
        >
        >
        > John Fleming
        > MMI
        >
      • AJT
        I strongly recommend legos for the wall. If any lego brick has 8 pins on top it will take 8 pins in the bottom. Same for 3 pins on top will have spaces for 3
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 8, 2012
          I strongly recommend legos for the wall. If any lego brick has 8 pins on top
          it will take 8 pins in the bottom. Same for 3 pins on top will have spaces
          for 3 pins in the bottom. I have several 100 all in white in all different
          sizes (pin configuration). I get all my legos from ebay. First I purchased
          1 pin to 8 pin and gained many small ones... You have to have mixed sizes, I
          my case every mold is a different size. The long ones are great for speed
          building once you get the bottom row placed or built. I always use
          package/masking tape to secure the bottom two rows and lap the tape onto the
          base board. This secures the mold fence and it won't shift or move. Plus it
          prevents any leaks at the base or between the legos. Hope this clears things
          up for ya!





          Jay



          From: casting@yahoogroups.com [mailto:casting@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          Richard
          Sent: Monday, October 08, 2012 12:53 PM
          To: casting@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [casting] Re: buying Lego's in bulk





          Not knowing a thing about Legos, I've been looking at some of the photos of
          them on eBay as well as the pick a brick websites. I would like to get some
          of the bricks to use for casting dams but I hope someone on here can set me
          straight. What I see in the photos of say a 2x4 is 8 posts or protrusions on
          the top and only 3 holes on the bottom. Don't they make a brick with 8 holes
          on the bottom, so they can be plugged together??
          Richard in Vermont

          --- In casting@yahoogroups.com <mailto:casting%40yahoogroups.com> , John J
          Fleming <John@...> wrote:
          >
          > > is there a supplier where i can buy lego's in bulk and the same size?
          >
          > http://shop.lego.com/en-US/Pick-A-Brick-11998, as has been pointed
          > out. But, I wouldn't order the 2x4 bricks. I would go for the 2x8.
          > They are the same price ($0.30) each, but you are getting twice as
          > much. And with the stock of 2x4 you probably already have, you can
          > use them for the short sides.
          >
          > They are the best for making molds. Re-useable, and infinitely
          > re-configurable. I make some very complex looking molds with them.
          > Molds need not be a rectangle. They are especially good for two-part
          > molds. The Lego pips make the PERFECT alignment pips. :) The two
          > halves almost snap together like the Lego. For the first few casts,
          > you almost need no clamping. Well, depending on the size and volume
          > of resin, of course.
          >
          > I don't Vaseline up the interior, I just live with the very slight
          > leakage. It's easier to deal with than the cleanup of the Vaseline. :O
          >
          >
          > Later...
          >
          >
          > John Fleming
          > MMI
          >





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • ihscoutfan@aol.com
          thanks for all the information. i talked to a guy at work that said there is a lego store in southern ohio and that s where he gets his. thanks to everyone!
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 9, 2012
            thanks for all the information. i talked to a guy at work that said there is a lego store in southern ohio and that's where he gets his. thanks to everyone!

            randall







            .







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Richard
            Guys, Sorry to be so dense but I don t understand how a Lego brick with 8 pins on top and only three holes on the bottom can plug into another brick that is
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 10, 2012
              Guys,
              Sorry to be so dense but I don't understand how a Lego brick with 8 pins on top and only three holes on the bottom can plug into another brick that is the same. I would be grateful for someone to explain this to me so I don't go and buy the wrong Legos. I only want to use them to make casting dams. Thanks.
              Richard in Vermont

              --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, "Richard" <rh@...> wrote:
              Not knowing a thing about Legos, I've been looking at some of the photos of them on eBay as well as the pick-a-brick websites. I would like to get some of the bricks to use for casting dams but I hope someone on here can set me straight. What I see in the photos of say a 2x4 is 8 posts or protrusions on the top and only 3 holes on the bottom. Don't they make a brick with 8 holes on the bottom, so they can be plugged together??
              Richard in Vermont
            • John J Fleming
              ... The three holes you see on the bottom do NOT click into the pips on top. They go into the space between the pips on top. The top pips fit into the spaces
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 10, 2012
                >Sorry to be so dense but I don't understand how a Lego brick with 8
                >pins on top and only three holes on the bottom can plug into another
                >brick that is the same. I would be grateful for someone to explain
                >this to me so I don't go and buy the wrong Legos. I only want to use
                >them to make casting dams. Thanks.

                The three holes you see on the bottom do NOT click into the
                pips on top. They go into the space between the pips on top. The top
                pips fit into the spaces around the holes on the bottom. It works,
                you don't need to know how. You just need bricks. :)

                You can NOT but the wrong Lego. Well, unless you pick up the
                giant Duplo. :O And standard Lego set will be fine. Go to a thrift
                store and pick of a cheap set. Play with it, and all will become
                clear. And you will NEVEL look back. Lego is the way to go!!!


                Later...


                John Fleming
                MMI
              • John J Fleming
                Hey Richard, Here is a good description that might help as well. Most Lego pieces have two basic components -- studs on top and tubes on the inside. A brick s
                Message 7 of 10 , Oct 10, 2012
                  Hey Richard,

                  Here is a good description that might help as well.

                  "Most Lego pieces have two basic components -- studs on top and tubes
                  on the inside. A brick's studs are slightly bigger than the space
                  between the tubes and the walls. When you press the bricks together,
                  the studs push the walls out and the tubes in. The material is
                  resilient and wants to hold its original shape, so the walls and
                  tubes press back against the studs. Friction also plays a role,
                  preventing the two bricks from sliding apart. This stud-and-tube
                  coupling system uses an interference fit -- a firm, friction-based
                  connection between two parts without the use of an additional fastener."


                  Hope that helps. And just what rock have you been living
                  under to NOT know about Lego?? ;)


                  Later...


                  John Fleming
                  MMI




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Andrew Emmerson
                  A picture is worth a thousand words and this document has many pictures, so it may be of help. It is very interesting anyway!
                  Message 8 of 10 , Oct 10, 2012
                    A picture is worth a thousand words and this document has many pictures, so it may be of help. It is very interesting anyway!

                    www.brickshelf.com/gallery/GJansson/Geometry/legogeometry.doc

                    Also...

                    http://www.dakkadakka.com/wiki/en/Simple_Two-Piece_Mold_for_Casting_with_Resin

                    http://www.b9robotresource.com/molding1.htm


                    Andy Emmerson.




                    From: John J Fleming
                    Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2012 4:05 PM
                    To: casting@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [casting] About Plugging Legos Together...



                    >Sorry to be so dense but I don't understand how a Lego brick with 8
                    >pins on top and only three holes on the bottom can plug into another
                    >brick that is the same. I would be grateful for someone to explain
                    >this to me so I don't go and buy the wrong Legos. I only want to use
                    >them to make casting dams. Thanks.

                    The three holes you see on the bottom do NOT click into the
                    pips on top. They go into the space between the pips on top. The top
                    pips fit into the spaces around the holes on the bottom. It works,
                    you don't need to know how. You just need bricks. :)

                    You can NOT but the wrong Lego. Well, unless you pick up the
                    giant Duplo. :O And standard Lego set will be fine. Go to a thrift
                    store and pick of a cheap set. Play with it, and all will become
                    clear. And you will NEVEL look back. Lego is the way to go!!!

                    Later...

                    John Fleming
                    MMI





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Kerry Wentworth
                    The 3 holes in the bottom are actually rings. X X O X X O X X O X X The Xs are kinobs on the top, the Os are rings in the bottom. The upper left X wedges
                    Message 9 of 10 , Oct 10, 2012
                      The 3 "holes" in the bottom are actually rings.

                      X X
                      O
                      X X
                      O
                      X X
                      O
                      X X

                      The Xs are kinobs on the top, the Os are rings in the bottom. The upper
                      left X wedges between the upper O and the side of the brick. And so
                      forth. All bricks are the same and fit together.

                      Kerry


                      Richard wrote:
                      > Guys,
                      > Sorry to be so dense but I don't understand how a Lego brick with 8 pins on top and only three holes on the bottom can plug into another brick that is the same. I would be grateful for someone to explain this to me so I don't go and buy the wrong Legos. I only want to use them to make casting dams. Thanks.
                      > Richard in Vermont
                      >
                      > --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, "Richard" <rh@...> wrote:
                      > Not knowing a thing about Legos, I've been looking at some of the photos of them on eBay as well as the pick-a-brick websites. I would like to get some of the bricks to use for casting dams but I hope someone on here can set me straight. What I see in the photos of say a 2x4 is 8 posts or protrusions on the top and only 3 holes on the bottom. Don't they make a brick with 8 holes on the bottom, so they can be plugged together??
                      > Richard in Vermont
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • Richard
                      Many thanks to all you good friends for explaining how Legos go together. Back in June I attended a model RR proto meet at Collinsville, CT and saw a seminar
                      Message 10 of 10 , Oct 11, 2012
                        Many thanks to all you good friends for explaining how Legos go together. Back in June I attended a model RR proto meet at Collinsville, CT and saw a seminar on casting with plaster. They were using Legos to make the dams. This was my first introduction to Legos.

                        John, I had to laugh out loud at you comment "And just what rock have you been living under to NOT know about Lego?? ;)" and I am still laughing. I love a good sense of humor. So now I have to explain that I am an old guy (74) and when I was a kid, Legos hadn't been invented yet. I grew up with erector sets, Lionel trains and Lincoln Logs. Anyway, thanks to you guys, I now know much more about Legos.
                        Richard in Vermont

                        --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, John J Fleming <John@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hey Richard,
                        >
                        > Here is a good description that might help as well.
                        >
                        > "Most Lego pieces have two basic components -- studs on top and tubes
                        > on the inside. A brick's studs are slightly bigger than the space
                        > between the tubes and the walls. When you press the bricks together,
                        > the studs push the walls out and the tubes in. The material is
                        > resilient and wants to hold its original shape, so the walls and
                        > tubes press back against the studs. Friction also plays a role,
                        > preventing the two bricks from sliding apart. This stud-and-tube
                        > coupling system uses an interference fit -- a firm, friction-based
                        > connection between two parts without the use of an additional fastener."
                        >
                        >
                        > Hope that helps. And just what rock have you been living
                        > under to NOT know about Lego?? ;)
                        >
                        >
                        > Later...
                        >
                        >
                        > John Fleming
                        > MMI
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
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