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Re: [casting] rtv rubber

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  • David Sleigh
    http://www.hobbysilicone.com/ http://www.moldmakingsilicone.com/ Same guys two sites, great range of products and prices, I use a bunch every year.   DB
    Message 1 of 35 , Jul 1, 2009
      http://www.hobbysilicone.com/
      http://www.moldmakingsilicone.com/
      Same guys two sites, great range of products and prices, I use a bunch every year.
       
      DB




      ________________________________
      From: Rob de Bie <robdebie@...>
      To: casting@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, July 1, 2009 1:12:53 AM
      Subject: Re: [casting] rtv rubber





      If you don't use a vacuum to degas, look for the lowest possible
      viscosity, so bubbles can rise to the surface easily. I'm currently
      using types with 5 and 20 Pa.s viscosity, and the difference is huge.

      Rob

      At 17:17 30-06-2009, you wrote:
      >I wanted to purchase RTV rubber to make mold masters so I'm looking
      >for a good place to purchase RTV Rubber and eventually resin. I do
      >not plan on making a large amount of reproductions but I'm looking
      >for a place that has good price and products I can work without
      >having to use things like vacuum pots or anything like that. I
      >would like to keep the set-up simple if I can.
      >Thanks for any help.
      >
      >Dave
      > ============ ========= ==
      >No one is in charge of your happiness except you.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      >
      >
      >
      >----------- --------- --------- -------
      >
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >






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    • Todd Kelley
      One or two of these might be of interest. They re castable, lightweight, and you ll get great detail: 
      Message 35 of 35 , Jul 18, 2009
        One or two of these might be of interest. They're castable, lightweight, and you'll get great detail: 
        http://www.smooth-on.com/Rigid-and-Flexible/c10/index.html
         
        Once again, if you're doing a 'one off', it wouldn't be particularly cost effective to make a bunch of molds. On the other hand, if you're making something you want to market on a small scale, it might work to make a model in clay or plaster, then mold it, then cast it in the foam I directed you to above. If you want to do it on the cheap, go to Home Depot, buy a couple of cans on foam insulation, and test it out. I'd spray some on a piece of foam core or something similarly ridgid as a test. Make a simple terrain, then shape to your satisfaction. You can sculpt it using sharp tools.

        --- On Fri, 7/17/09, Corey Minion <csminion@...> wrote:


        From: Corey Minion <csminion@...>
        Subject: RE: [casting] rubber models
        To: casting@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, July 17, 2009, 7:09 PM


         



        May I suggest a blending of a few materials:
        Base structures, pink or blue foam insulation formed with a hot wire or bow
        The model out what you want and cast it in foamed latex in a hydrocal mold.
        Then you can paint to your hearts content with latex paints.

        _____

        From: casting@yahoogroups .com [mailto:casting@yahoogroups .com] On Behalf Of
        Dave D
        Sent: Friday, July 17, 2009 4:48 PM
        To: casting@yahoogroups .com
        Subject: Re: [casting] rubber models

        I was thinking of something with less weight for Free-Mo modules that I
        would be moving all the time so I wanted lightweight and a little flex so it
        would not chip but flex when you knock it into walls or people get to close.
        :-)

        You do make good points about hte material being to flexible and the paint
        not so that would be a problem. I like the foam idea you mentioned. What
        type of foam product are you using and do you get good details from you
        mold?
        Dave

        ============ ========= ==
        No one is in charge of your happiness except you.

        http://rbdhd. <http://rbdhd. t35.com/> t35.com/
        Railbuilderdhd

        ____________ _________ _________ __
        From: Todd Kelley <todd@underocean. <mailto:todd% 40underocean. com> com>
        To: casting@yahoogroups <mailto:casting% 40yahoogroups. com> .com
        Sent: Friday, July 17, 2009 12:41:16 PM
        Subject: Re: [casting] rubber models

        Just out of curiosity, why do you need a flexible product for making
        scenery? One thing to watch out for with silicones and urethanes is their
        paintability. You can make a great looking rock, mountain or tunnel, but you
        may not be able to paint it realistically or get 'grass' to stick. Also, if
        you do manage to get it painted and it flexes, the paint may flake off. If
        you get a product that won't flex and cause coating loss, it will probably
        be so stiff that you might as well use plastic resin or even gypsum-based
        products. Just my two cents, there are probably guys on this forum with a
        lot more experience who can guide you through this.

        If this is a one time project, you might have fun using expanding foam to
        get the approximate shape for your land contours, then using tools to shape
        it to the exact dimensions you're after. Foam will make your land shapes
        sturdy and lightweight, and also has a certain degree of 'give' to it, so
        you don't have to worry about it cracking if you need to move your diorama
        around.

        --- On Fri, 7/17/09, Ted Quick <rim_molder@ yahoo. com> wrote:

        From: Ted Quick <rim_molder@ yahoo. com>
        Subject: Re: [casting] rubber models
        To: casting@yahoogroups .com
        Date: Friday, July 17, 2009, 7:55 AM

        There are a fair collection of silicone rubbers or very flexible urethanes
        available. The silicones tend to be a LOT more expensive but may be
        better for what you need.

        Ted Quick

        ----- Original Message ----
        > From: Dave D <dcwebguy@yahoo. com>
        > To: casting@yahoogroups .com
        > Sent: Friday, July 17, 2009 10:40:36 AM
        > Subject: [casting] rubber models
        >
        > I wanted to know if there is any products that are like plastic resin but
        are
        > really a rubber product that will have flexibility when the casting is
        dry. I
        > want to model scenery for a diorama but I want something that will flex
        unlike
        > hydrocal or resin.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Dave

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