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Re: Pressurizing the pot - compressors?

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  • Jack Mc Kie
    Charles, I would sugggest that a compressor with a 2 gal storage tank capable of producing 100psi will do the trick. HP really doesn t matter a lot. If you
    Message 1 of 6 , May 8, 2009
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      Charles,

      I would sugggest that a compressor with a >2 gal storage tank capable of producing 100psi will do the trick. HP really doesn't matter a lot. If you are a craftsman you might find other uses for a compressor so you may want to read up on compressors and air tools. I use a 2HP 8gal Harbor Freight compressor to run casting machines and pressure vessels. Generally speaking bigger is better.

      Hope that helps,

      Jack Mc Kie
      Freshwater Models


      --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, "Charles Hroch" <thunderboyhi@...> wrote:
      >
      > For a 2.5-gallon pot, what compressor HP and/or capacity is the recommended minimum?
      >
      > --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Banwell" <TomBanwell@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Answer: The fast way, and the fast way. ;o)
      > >
      > > Tom
      > > Tom Banwell Designs Inc
      > > www.lumicast.com
      > > www.tombanwell.etsy.com
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ---------------------------------------------------------
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: meldridge2000
      > > To: casting@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Wednesday, 06 May, 2009 1:50 PM
      > > Subject: [casting] Pressurizing the pot
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > I have acquired a pressure pot which includes a valve in the air line. My question is how fast to pressurize, and depressurize. So, I mix my urethane compounds, pour the mold, put it in the pot, clamp the lid, then...
      > > Should I have the valve open, then turn on the compressor (the slow way) or should I have the compressor tank pressurized already, and open the valve (the fast way)?
      > > Same after curing, should I disconnect the line, then open the valve quickly to depressurize (the fast way) or slowly open the valve (slow way)?
      > >
      > > -Michael Eldridge
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
    • redrocket
      I make small castings. I have a bag of kitty litter that takes up 50% of my pot. So getting to my pressure is twice as fast. Some use bricks. If you don t need
      Message 2 of 6 , May 8, 2009
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        I make small castings. I have a bag of kitty litter that takes up 50% of my pot. So getting to my pressure is twice as fast. Some use bricks. If you don't need the full depth, pill it in.

        M
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Jack Mc Kie
        To: casting@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, May 08, 2009 2:37 AM
        Subject: [casting] Re: Pressurizing the pot - compressors?





        Charles,

        I would sugggest that a compressor with a >2 gal storage tank capable of producing 100psi will do the trick. HP really doesn't matter a lot. If you are a craftsman you might find other uses for a compressor so you may want to read up on compressors and air tools. I use a 2HP 8gal Harbor Freight compressor to run casting machines and pressure vessels. Generally speaking bigger is better.

        Hope that helps,

        Jack Mc Kie
        Freshwater Models

        --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, "Charles Hroch" <thunderboyhi@...> wrote:
        >
        > For a 2.5-gallon pot, what compressor HP and/or capacity is the recommended minimum?
        >
        > --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Banwell" <TomBanwell@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Answer: The fast way, and the fast way. ;o)
        > >
        > > Tom
        > > Tom Banwell Designs Inc
        > > www.lumicast.com
        > > www.tombanwell.etsy.com
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ---------------------------------------------------------
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: meldridge2000
        > > To: casting@yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Wednesday, 06 May, 2009 1:50 PM
        > > Subject: [casting] Pressurizing the pot
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I have acquired a pressure pot which includes a valve in the air line. My question is how fast to pressurize, and depressurize. So, I mix my urethane compounds, pour the mold, put it in the pot, clamp the lid, then...
        > > Should I have the valve open, then turn on the compressor (the slow way) or should I have the compressor tank pressurized already, and open the valve (the fast way)?
        > > Same after curing, should I disconnect the line, then open the valve quickly to depressurize (the fast way) or slowly open the valve (slow way)?
        > >
        > > -Michael Eldridge
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • lmshutt@hiwaay.net
        ... I use discs of Styrofoam cut to (loosely) fit the pot. Some have holes cut in them to support taller molds. The Air Compressor I use is 15 gal / 1.3 HP.
        Message 3 of 6 , May 9, 2009
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          On Fri, 8 May 2009 15:24:26 -0700, you wrote:

          >I make small castings. I have a bag of kitty litter that takes up 50% of my pot. So getting to my pressure is twice as fast. Some use bricks. If you don't need the full depth, pill it in.
          >
          >M

          I use discs of Styrofoam cut to (loosely) fit the pot. Some have holes
          cut in them to support taller molds.

          The Air Compressor I use is 15 gal / 1.3 HP.
          When filled to 120 psi (below the safety limit) I can get 5-6 castings
          in my 2.5 gal tank with 80% of excess space filled in.

          Warning: check the current draw on the compressor before you buy.
          Most residential wiring in the US have 15-20 amp breakers on each
          circuit. Each circuit usually covers 2-3 rooms including lighting.
          While most breakers are inverse time (small overload = long trip time,
          large overload = quick trip) it is easy to get a compressor that is
          unusable in your home without a dedicated circuit.

          My compressor draws 15 amps at 1.3 HP and works on my garage only
          circuit. Even there I need to be careful, the compressor with lights
          and ventilation are over the breaker rating, any additional load
          greater than a dremmel tool will trip the breaker.

          --
          Lane
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