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Color mixing system??

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  • Scott Stewart
    Are there any links that can help me mix colors of opaque pigments for resin / urethane? For example I m trying to mix a color closely resembling creamy peanut
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 1, 2007
      Are there any links that can help me mix colors of opaque pigments for
      resin / urethane?

      For example I'm trying to mix a color closely resembling creamy peanut
      butter. I have the RGB value of the color I want but I need to turn
      that into a color 'recipe' like 5 parts yellow, 1 part brown, 3 parts
      red and 1 part blue. I've googled my heart out but can't seem to find
      what I need - any help?

      I know it all depends on the pigments I'm using, etc. but just
      something to get me close using standard colors - I can then adjust if
      my 'red' is not really 'red'....

      Scott
    • DOC
      AFAIK it s a bit hit and miss since the color values you get would depend on whether you are using silicone, urethane... I would start with the values I have
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 1, 2007
        AFAIK it's a bit hit and miss since the color values you get would
        depend on whether you are using silicone, urethane...

        I would start with the values I have and mix up a small test batch
        based on the percentages of each.

        Then add a little artistic talent and... :-)


        And as you probably know, you can get RGB and other color
        values from programs like Photo Shop.

        DOC



        At 02:57 PM 9/1/2007 +0000, you wrote:

        >Are there any links that can help me mix colors of opaque pigments for
        >resin / urethane?
        >
        >For example I'm trying to mix a color closely resembling creamy peanut
        >butter. I have the RGB value of the color I want but I need to turn
        >that into a color 'recipe' like 5 parts yellow, 1 part brown, 3 parts
        >red and 1 part blue. I've googled my heart out but can't seem to find
        >what I need - any help?
        >
        >I know it all depends on the pigments I'm using, etc. but just
        >something to get me close using standard colors - I can then adjust if
        >my 'red' is not really 'red'....
        >
        >Scott
        >
        >

        Buy my junk! http://www3.sympatico.ca/doc/robotone/for-sale.html
      • Greg Krynen
        Have you tried the pigment manufacturers website or support phone number? They may have a solution for you. ... Greg Krynen www.Krynen.com
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 1, 2007
          Have you tried the pigment manufacturers website or
          support phone number? They may have a solution for
          you.


          --- DOC <doc@...> wrote:

          > AFAIK it's a bit hit and miss since the color values
          > you get would
          > depend on whether you are using silicone,
          > urethane...
          >
          > I would start with the values I have and mix up a
          > small test batch
          > based on the percentages of each.
          >
          > Then add a little artistic talent and... :-)
          >
          >
          > And as you probably know, you can get RGB and other
          > color
          > values from programs like Photo Shop.
          >
          > DOC
          >
          >
          >
          > At 02:57 PM 9/1/2007 +0000, you wrote:
          >
          > >Are there any links that can help me mix colors of
          > opaque pigments for
          > >resin / urethane?
          > >
          > >For example I'm trying to mix a color closely
          > resembling creamy peanut
          > >butter. I have the RGB value of the color I want
          > but I need to turn
          > >that into a color 'recipe' like 5 parts yellow, 1
          > part brown, 3 parts
          > >red and 1 part blue. I've googled my heart out but
          > can't seem to find
          > >what I need - any help?
          > >
          > >I know it all depends on the pigments I'm using,
          > etc. but just
          > >something to get me close using standard colors - I
          > can then adjust if
          > >my 'red' is not really 'red'....
          > >
          > >Scott
          > >
          > >
          >
          > Buy my junk!
          > http://www3.sympatico.ca/doc/robotone/for-sale.html
          >
          >


          Greg Krynen
          www.Krynen.com
          www.PurpleDragonGifts.com
          www.PurpleDragonTraders.com
        • henry halikas
          Take a sample of the color you are trying to achieve to A SHERWIN WILLIAMS STORE, (One which has a computer) that can give you the correct formulae or mixture
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 2, 2007
            Take a sample of the color you are trying to achieve to A SHERWIN WILLIAMS STORE, (One which has a computer) that can give you the correct formulae or mixture % of ingredients you require, to achieve the color you are looking for.

            Then it's just a matter of experimenting on a small scale,.

            Keep your eye peeled for a Japanese book whose artist literally spent years braking down colors!

            The book literally shows page after page of different levels of colors to achieve a specific color.

            I had my hands on such a book a long time ago (1985) unfortuanatly was quite unsuccessful in trying to relocate it, Or the name of the artist.

            henry

            Scott Stewart <scott@...> wrote:
            Are there any links that can help me mix colors of opaque pigments for
            resin / urethane?

            For example I'm trying to mix a color closely resembling creamy peanut
            butter. I have the RGB value of the color I want but I need to turn
            that into a color 'recipe' like 5 parts yellow, 1 part brown, 3 parts
            red and 1 part blue. I've googled my heart out but can't seem to find
            what I need - any help?

            I know it all depends on the pigments I'm using, etc. but just
            something to get me close using standard colors - I can then adjust if
            my 'red' is not really 'red'....

            Scott






            ---------------------------------
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            Play Sims Stories at Yahoo! Games.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Glen Pettit
            ... Scott: Trial & error is the system we all use in the end as each batch of resin is different (and can change with age). The standard that all
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 6, 2007
              > Are there any links that can help me mix colors of opaque pigments for
              > resin / urethane?
              Scott:
              Trial & error is the system we all use in the end as each batch of resin is different (and can
              change with age).
              The standard that all Printers/designers/textiles/paint manufactures use is called "The
              Pantone Matching System" [Pantone.com].
              As mentioned, you can take your example to match to most any large paint store (inc.
              Home Depot) and they can match it with their paint, then can also hit a key to tell you the
              exact parts of CMYK & W it takes. In mixing, they don't really use Blue & Red, the colors
              are Cyan (a soft blueish color), Magenta (a pinkish red color), then Yellow, Black (K for Key
              color) and White.
              These are the same colors as used on a computer or TV monitor (which use filters RGB
              [red-green-blue] to get the CMYK: all 3 colors = white, no colors = black, then each CMY
              color is in percentages of 1 to 100% to get all the colors.
              Paint/Ink/Pigment mixing does the same, percentages (or parts of) in combinations to get
              these millions of colors. It's important to remember that Black and White are also in there:
              for example a 'Red Cross Red' may be a pigment of: 80% Magenta, 2% Yellow, 6% Cyan, 2%
              Black and 12% pure white which is added to a given volumn of base paint (which like a
              base or resin, has it's own shade or color).
              Recommendation: make an educated gues as to the mixture and experiment. Also,
              remember that a fresh/wet product may change color or gloss slightly when dry.
              Good Luck, Michigan Glen
            • Scott Stewart
              Thanks Glen, Unfortunately the paint mixing idea didn t work out for me as the paint store folks said that it depends too much on the base used... I did
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 7, 2007
                Thanks Glen,
                Unfortunately the paint mixing idea didn't work out for me as the
                paint store folks said that it depends too much on the base used... I
                did discover that using cheap acryllic paint from the craft store
                color matched to my particular resin pigments is a MUCH cheaper trial
                and error medium than the actual pigments. I was able to play around
                with the acryllic colors and got a 'formula' of the color I wanted and
                then with just a little tweaking was able to replicate that using the
                resin and pigments.

                The problem with CMYK is that my pigment colors are not Cyan and
                Magenta. I've got primary and secondary colors only.

                Thanks to all that replied.

                Scott
                --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, "Glen Pettit" <glenpettit@...> wrote:
                >
                > > Are there any links that can help me mix colors of opaque pigments for
                > > resin / urethane?
                > Scott:
                > Trial & error is the system we all use in the end as each batch of
                resin is different (and can
                > change with age).
                > The standard that all Printers/designers/textiles/paint manufactures
                use is called "The
                > Pantone Matching System" [Pantone.com].
                > As mentioned, you can take your example to match to most any large
                paint store (inc.
                > Home Depot) and they can match it with their paint, then can also
                hit a key to tell you the
                > exact parts of CMYK & W it takes. In mixing, they don't really use
                Blue & Red, the colors
                > are Cyan (a soft blueish color), Magenta (a pinkish red color), then
                Yellow, Black (K for Key
                > color) and White.
                > These are the same colors as used on a computer or TV monitor (which
                use filters RGB
                > [red-green-blue] to get the CMYK: all 3 colors = white, no colors =
                black, then each CMY
                > color is in percentages of 1 to 100% to get all the colors.
                > Paint/Ink/Pigment mixing does the same, percentages (or parts of) in
                combinations to get
                > these millions of colors. It's important to remember that Black and
                White are also in there:
                > for example a 'Red Cross Red' may be a pigment of: 80% Magenta, 2%
                Yellow, 6% Cyan, 2%
                > Black and 12% pure white which is added to a given volumn of base
                paint (which like a
                > base or resin, has it's own shade or color).
                > Recommendation: make an educated gues as to the mixture and
                experiment. Also,
                > remember that a fresh/wet product may change color or gloss slightly
                when dry.
                > Good Luck, Michigan Glen
                >
              • Scott Stewart
                Thanks Ray, Those are the pigments I use as well. That s what I meant by only having the primary / secondary colors available to mix. Pretty easy to get
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 10, 2007
                  Thanks Ray,
                  Those are the pigments I use as well. That's what I meant by only
                  having the 'primary / secondary' colors available to mix. Pretty easy
                  to get these same colors in acrylic paints to test mix.

                  I also have been very happy with Eager plastics in everything I've
                  done with them. Good folks and fast shipment.

                  Scott

                  --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, "Ray K." <katke@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Scott:
                  >
                  > I pulled my hair out when I first started trying to EXACTLY match
                  colors
                  > in resin. In my castings, I MUST have custom-blended shades of color
                  > that are perfectly homogenous throughout, and that are totally
                  opaque to
                  > simulate the colored bakelites and "Tenite" that was used in the 1930's
                  > to color the old dial telephones - www.telephonecreations.com
                  >
                  > Here's what I did that works perfectly for me every time:
                  >
                  > You first have to have a "common denominator", meaning, a resin to use
                  > that has NO color; in this case, I use water-clear resin only. You can
                  > get away with Smooth-on's (MUCH cheaper) SC-325 326 & 327 resins.
                  > Unfortunately, it shrinks just a little too much for my use in most
                  > parts, since I have to hold tight tolerances to use the original 1930's
                  > metal parts inside of the castings.
                  >
                  > 2nd, you have to get GOOD opaque pigments for coloring of the resin.
                  > These were actually more difficult to find than I thought!
                  >
                  > After experimenting with over 8 different vendor's products, I finally
                  > settled on opaque pigments from Eager Plastics in Chicago. There
                  website
                  > is at: www.eagerplastics.com They also have MANY other great products
                  > for us to use as well.
                  >
                  > There EP7702 is what I use, and you can match pretty much ANY shade or
                  > hue with these available colors (below):
                  >
                  > Black
                  > Mustard Gold (Sienna)
                  > Blue
                  > Orange
                  > Brown
                  > Peach / Flesh
                  > Fire Red (Price is double of those listed below)
                  > Red
                  > * Glow-in-the-Dark, tinted to the green (* Note Special Pricing below)
                  > White
                  > Green
                  > Yellow
                  >
                  > I will warn you however, that on some of these pigments, after blending
                  > to get the perfectly correct color, I have to then run the blended
                  > pigment through a VERY fine bronze filter screen to get larger "chunks"
                  > of pigment out that might look a little to prominent in a lighter shade
                  > of pigment. I made kind of a mini "flour-sifter" thingie to properly
                  > strain my pigments.
                  >
                  > Eager also has many transparent tints that work well in the water-clear
                  > resins too.
                  >
                  > No affiliation; just like their products!
                  >
                  > Good luck,
                  >
                  > Ray K.
                  > www.telephonecreations.com
                  >
                • Ray K.
                  I agree about how good Eager Plastics is on customer service; they re great! Of course, I only live about 200 miles from them, so shipments usually arrive the
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 10, 2007
                    I agree about how good Eager Plastics is on customer service; they're
                    great! Of course, I only live about 200 miles from them, so shipments
                    usually arrive the next day.

                    I do use one other "additive" to get a couple of odd shades. I have an
                    especially tricky color to match called, "Orchid" in the 1934 original
                    catalog that I have from Automatic Electric Telephone (grandfather of
                    Verizon). It's kind of a pastel Lilac color with just a hint of fushia
                    to it. I tried for almost 2 years to get it dead-right, finally
                    "accidentally discovering the technique discribed below.

                    I actually utilize the White pigment from Eager Plastics for the opacity
                    and base, but then add just a couple of drops of Smooth-on's Violet
                    "So-Strong" tint to the pigment. They don't like each other too well
                    (they will actually seperate after a few minutes of setting), but I find
                    the color-match PERFECT, and simply vigorously mix the 2 just before
                    measuring and adding the pigment to the water-clear resin.

                    Incidentally, I don't know what you are using for a ratio, but I have
                    settled on 1-1/2% by volume of (total) resin used. I have developed a
                    standardized method of dispensing by utilizing hypodermic syringes for
                    precise measuring, so that I can duplicate exactly my color formulas.
                    For those of you that plan on mixing your own pigments, invest in one of
                    those tiny "drink mixers". I bought a mini-mixer that runs on 2 - AA
                    batteries, and it works great!

                    On a related topic, I have done some experimenting with trying to
                    duplicate the look and depth of both ancient Amber, AND Tortoise Shell.
                    I don't have pictures with me (not at home), but if anyone wants to see
                    the results, you are welcome to e-mail me. I utilized all Alumilite
                    products on this one.

                    Ray Kotke
                    www.telephonecreations.com


                    Scott Stewart wrote:

                    >
                    >
                    > Thanks Ray,
                    > Those are the pigments I use as well. That's what I meant by only
                    > having the 'primary / secondary' colors available to mix. Pretty easy
                    > to get these same colors in acrylic paints to test mix.
                    >
                    > I also have been very happy with Eager plastics in everything I've
                    > done with them. Good folks and fast shipment.
                    >
                    > Scott
                    >
                    > --- In casting@yahoogroups.com <mailto:casting%40yahoogroups.com>, "Ray
                    > K." <katke@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Scott:
                    > >
                    > > I pulled my hair out when I first started trying to EXACTLY match
                    > colors
                    > > in resin. In my castings, I MUST have custom-blended shades of color
                    > > that are perfectly homogenous throughout, and that are totally
                    > opaque to
                    > > simulate the colored bakelites and "Tenite" that was used in the 1930's
                    > > to color the old dial telephones - www.telephonecreations.com
                    > >
                    > > Here's what I did that works perfectly for me every time:
                    > >
                    > > You first have to have a "common denominator", meaning, a resin to use
                    > > that has NO color; in this case, I use water-clear resin only. You can
                    > > get away with Smooth-on's (MUCH cheaper) SC-325 326 & 327 resins.
                    > > Unfortunately, it shrinks just a little too much for my use in most
                    > > parts, since I have to hold tight tolerances to use the original 1930's
                    > > metal parts inside of the castings.
                    > >
                    > > 2nd, you have to get GOOD opaque pigments for coloring of the resin.
                    > > These were actually more difficult to find than I thought!
                    > >
                    > > After experimenting with over 8 different vendor's products, I finally
                    > > settled on opaque pigments from Eager Plastics in Chicago. There
                    > website
                    > > is at: www.eagerplastics.com They also have MANY other great products
                    > > for us to use as well.
                    > >
                    > > There EP7702 is what I use, and you can match pretty much ANY shade or
                    > > hue with these available colors (below):
                    > >
                    > > Black
                    > > Mustard Gold (Sienna)
                    > > Blue
                    > > Orange
                    > > Brown
                    > > Peach / Flesh
                    > > Fire Red (Price is double of those listed below)
                    > > Red
                    > > * Glow-in-the-Dark, tinted to the green (* Note Special Pricing below)
                    > > White
                    > > Green
                    > > Yellow
                    > >
                    > > I will warn you however, that on some of these pigments, after blending
                    > > to get the perfectly correct color, I have to then run the blended
                    > > pigment through a VERY fine bronze filter screen to get larger "chunks"
                    > > of pigment out that might look a little to prominent in a lighter shade
                    > > of pigment. I made kind of a mini "flour-sifter" thingie to properly
                    > > strain my pigments.
                    > >
                    > > Eager also has many transparent tints that work well in the water-clear
                    > > resins too.
                    > >
                    > > No affiliation; just like their products!
                    > >
                    > > Good luck,
                    > >
                    > > Ray K.
                    > > www.telephonecreations.com
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                  • Ray K.
                    Scott: I pulled my hair out when I first started trying to EXACTLY match colors in resin. In my castings, I MUST have custom-blended shades of color that are
                    Message 9 of 9 , Oct 7, 2007
                      Scott:

                      I pulled my hair out when I first started trying to EXACTLY match colors
                      in resin. In my castings, I MUST have custom-blended shades of color
                      that are perfectly homogenous throughout, and that are totally opaque to
                      simulate the colored bakelites and "Tenite" that was used in the 1930's
                      to color the old dial telephones - www.telephonecreations.com

                      Here's what I did that works perfectly for me every time:

                      You first have to have a "common denominator", meaning, a resin to use
                      that has NO color; in this case, I use water-clear resin only. You can
                      get away with Smooth-on's (MUCH cheaper) SC-325 326 & 327 resins.
                      Unfortunately, it shrinks just a little too much for my use in most
                      parts, since I have to hold tight tolerances to use the original 1930's
                      metal parts inside of the castings.

                      2nd, you have to get GOOD opaque pigments for coloring of the resin.
                      These were actually more difficult to find than I thought!

                      After experimenting with over 8 different vendor's products, I finally
                      settled on opaque pigments from Eager Plastics in Chicago. There website
                      is at: www.eagerplastics.com They also have MANY other great products
                      for us to use as well.

                      There EP7702 is what I use, and you can match pretty much ANY shade or
                      hue with these available colors (below):

                      Black
                      Mustard Gold (Sienna)
                      Blue
                      Orange
                      Brown
                      Peach / Flesh
                      Fire Red (Price is double of those listed below)
                      Red
                      * Glow-in-the-Dark, tinted to the green (* Note Special Pricing below)
                      White
                      Green
                      Yellow

                      I will warn you however, that on some of these pigments, after blending
                      to get the perfectly correct color, I have to then run the blended
                      pigment through a VERY fine bronze filter screen to get larger "chunks"
                      of pigment out that might look a little to prominent in a lighter shade
                      of pigment. I made kind of a mini "flour-sifter" thingie to properly
                      strain my pigments.

                      Eager also has many transparent tints that work well in the water-clear
                      resins too.

                      No affiliation; just like their products!

                      Good luck,

                      Ray K.
                      www.telephonecreations.com
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