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Re: Casting in metal from hard wax (question)

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  • John
    Charles, Thank you for your answer. I didn t realize how stupid museum-quality metal sounded until I read your reply... hmmm... pretty dorky. Ahhh well. I
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 1, 2007
      Charles,

      Thank you for your answer. I didn't realize how stupid "museum-quality"
      metal sounded until I read your reply... hmmm... pretty dorky. Ahhh
      well. I was thinking brass/brass alloy, yada, yada... not what I have
      heard called "pot metal," or something cheap or soft? Well, definitely
      shows my inexperience. And, no, not a re-enactor... I am beginning to
      build a detailed architectural model (1/48 scale) of a Victorian
      structure. The piece being modelled is a balcony railing post -
      beautiful and detailed, and only 1 1/8" in my scale. Most of the rest
      of this model I am carving or crafting from hardwoods and brass, but
      these railing posts were a little beyond me. So, any ideas on who
      can "professionally investment cast" my piece and how much might it
      cost?? Thanks!! John Havel

      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
      Hi John,

      A re-enactor eh?

      Museum quality metal? What an unusual term, maybe it means accurate
      alloy mix. I use 90/10 for this purpose (90/10 mean 90 percent copper,
      10 percent tin). If you have time you could do this yourself, is time
      limited? Doing this yourself will save you money.
      You have the wax model already, get the model professionally investment
      cast, polish it up, then make a RTV rubber mould of it. Get as many
      pieces cast as you need. This will cost you a fair amount of cash.

      Regards Charles from Oz
    • Duane Engle
      You can also have a machinest turn these on a lath then finish the details such as engraving thru any trophy shop that does brass plates for rewards. Or find
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 1, 2007
        You can also have a machinest turn these on a lath then finish the details such as engraving thru any trophy shop that does brass plates for rewards. Or find an old style engraver who will take these on [hint, do as many at one time as you can cost is far less than for 'onesees']

        John <justhman@...> wrote: Charles,

        Thank you for your answer. I didn't realize how stupid "museum-quality"
        metal sounded until I read your reply... hmmm... pretty dorky. Ahhh
        well. I was thinking brass/brass alloy, yada, yada... not what I have
        heard called "pot metal," or something cheap or soft? Well, definitely
        shows my inexperience. And, no, not a re-enactor... I am beginning to
        build a detailed architectural model (1/48 scale) of a Victorian
        structure. The piece being modelled is a balcony railing post -
        beautiful and detailed, and only 1 1/8" in my scale. Most of the rest
        of this model I am carving or crafting from hardwoods and brass, but
        these railing posts were a little beyond me. So, any ideas on who
        can "professionally investment cast" my piece and how much might it
        cost?? Thanks!! John Havel

        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Hi John,

        A re-enactor eh?

        Museum quality metal? What an unusual term, maybe it means accurate
        alloy mix. I use 90/10 for this purpose (90/10 mean 90 percent copper,
        10 percent tin). If you have time you could do this yourself, is time
        limited? Doing this yourself will save you money.
        You have the wax model already, get the model professionally investment
        cast, polish it up, then make a RTV rubber mould of it. Get as many
        pieces cast as you need. This will cost you a fair amount of cash.

        Regards Charles from Oz






        ---------------------------------
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Charles Anderson
        Well John, It s not stupid, it s just a little ambiguous ;-) You sounded like a re-enactor, no offense intended. Re-enactors are usually extremely well
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 1, 2007
          Well John,

          It's not stupid, it's just a little ambiguous ;-)

          You sounded like a re-enactor, no offense intended. Re-enactors are
          usually extremely well researched, getting details and materials correct.

          So the item is fairly small? If this is that case then it could be
          quite affordable to get done professionally

          If you're in Australia, then there are companies that will do the work,
          you just supply the wax master and they produce as many as you want.
          You usually look for jewelry casting houses (when it's jewelry or art,
          shop = house). Cost it's usually metal plus labor, if it bronze
          (phosphor or silicon bronze), then it works out to be 6 - 10 cents a
          gram, plus about $70 labor (Australian dollars). To get the weight of
          the resultant metal piece multiply the weight of the wax by 8 (for
          brasses and bronzes), the figure will be rough, but will give you an idea.

          If you get a "friend" to do the job for you, I would suggest that you
          get a rubber for your wax.

          The project sounds lovely, when you have completed the project a picture
          would be appreciated :-)



          Regards Charles from Oz



          John wrote:

          >Charles,
          >
          >Thank you for your answer. I didn't realize how stupid "museum-quality"
          >metal sounded until I read your reply... hmmm... pretty dorky. Ahhh
          >well. I was thinking brass/brass alloy, yada, yada... not what I have
          >heard called "pot metal," or something cheap or soft? Well, definitely
          >shows my inexperience. And, no, not a re-enactor... I am beginning to
          >build a detailed architectural model (1/48 scale) of a Victorian
          >structure. The piece being modelled is a balcony railing post -
          >beautiful and detailed, and only 1 1/8" in my scale. Most of the rest
          >of this model I am carving or crafting from hardwoods and brass, but
          >these railing posts were a little beyond me. So, any ideas on who
          >can "professionally investment cast" my piece and how much might it
          >cost?? Thanks!! John Havel
          >
          >
        • John
          Duane, Thanks for your answer. The piece I need cannot be turned, I have talked with several folks about this... it is too decorative and flowery, it has
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 2, 2007
            Duane,

            Thanks for your answer. The piece I need cannot be turned, I have
            talked with several folks about this... it is too decorative
            and "flowery," it has square, round, octagonal, and "curvy" sections
            all on the same piece - leave it to the Victorians! The person I have
            found (after much looking) is a professional jewelry carver/artist and
            she is confident that she can reproduce it exactly in miniature. But
            thanks for the suggestions.

            --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, Duane Engle <drecaster@...> wrote:
            You can also have a machinest turn these on a lath then finish the
            details such as engraving thru any trophy shop that does brass plates
            for rewards. Or find an old style engraver who will take these on
            [hint, do as many at one time as you can cost is far less than
            for 'onesees']
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