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Re: Re: Resource for Sculptors of Military Miniatures

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  • Oliver T.
    ... Absolooterly! Forkin loose hay from a hayfield up to a wagon, then standing on the hay on the loaded wagon and forkin it up into a haymow for ten hours a
    Message 1 of 18 , Sep 30, 2006
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      > Peasants and their garden implements won many a
      > war against the nobility and their limited amounts
      > of martial arms.

      Absolooterly! Forkin' loose hay from a hayfield up to a wagon, then
      standing on the hay on the loaded wagon and forkin' it up into a haymow for
      ten hours a day teaches a feller real quick about proper foot placement,
      center of balance, center of mass, moments of inertia, rhythm and economy of
      movement. If you do a poor job, you're hurtin'...do a bad job and you're
      crippled...and quickly.
      A decent-length pitchfork(any I ever used were at least eight feet long)
      with a good ash handle and three, tough, flexible steel tines was a lethal
      weapon(regular use sharpens the tines to a needle-point) in the hands of an
      angry farmer.
      The only fight I ever saw with pitchforks was over a farmer's
      daughter...fight lasted all of 20 seconds, and ended with the loser's foot
      pinned to the ground with the arch of the fork. When he looked down and
      realized that the center tine had gone between his toes, he gave in...fast!
      Clearin' land with an ax and brushhook, shovelin' taters or stackin'
      pulpwood keeps a person fit and limber, but a pitchfork gives you reach...

      Oliver T.
      Armstrong, NB
    • Uncle Thor
      Charles, I took no offense. Just figured I ought to let folks know why this project will work. Casting bronze that will be in water: I know there is an alloy
      Message 2 of 18 , Oct 1, 2006
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        Charles,

        I took no offense. Just figured I ought to let folks know why this
        project will work.

        Casting bronze that will be in water: I know there is an alloy in
        that family of metals that can resist weather. They use it in
        making track for garden railroads. (scroll down to the garden
        railroad site at http://www.thortrains.net to see some - also get
        ideas on something to highlight the pond) What do you use to make
        the mold for bronze?

        As to trees: the reason I have to cast in the garage is trees. No
        casting in the yard here. I can't have a leaf or seed pod falling
        into the alloy. We have a bunch of trees in back. When we bought
        this house, it was worse. The backyard looked like a jungle. Now it
        looks civilized - got pics of it posted with the garden railroad
        stuff.

        What I really need now is a suggestion for an RTV that will handle a
        few hundred pours with a tin / lead alloy at no higher than 650 F,
        and won't require me to use an yspecial tools suc has a vacuum
        machine. There's a nifty set of antigue soldiers I want to recast.

        Well, let me run. My wide is calling for me for a trip to the
        supermarket.

        Thor




        \--- In casting@yahoogroups.com, Charles Anderson
        <charlesanderson@...> wrote:
        >
        > Uncle Thor wrote:
        >
        > >Having stated the facts, let's have a little fun:
        > >
        > >Now let's talk about Charles. I conjecture that he has a very
        small
        > >yard with a lawn, a lot of rocks and no trees. My evidence for
        this
        > >is that he recommends trying poses with the handle of a maul. He
        did
        > >not mention garden implements. A maul is rather tame. I can go
        one
        > >better. I have a garage full of garden implements. I have an
        > >extending tool can be an 8' glaive or a 16' pike. There are all
        > >sorts of choppers and whackers and hatchets and the kind of
        wicked
        > >implements that would have made Hans Thalhoffer jump for joy.
        You
        > >do not need weapons when you have the right sort of garden
        > >implements. Charles, get a large yard and you can have garden
        > >implements, too. They're fun! :-D
        > >
        > >Have fun!
        > >
        > >Thor
        > >
        > Hi Thor,
        >
        > I'll leave the rest of the subject alone, I was concerned that you
        may
        > get overwhelmed with re-enactors and SCA contesting your book is
        all,
        > occultists are probably not as bitchy as some of the re-enactors
        and SCA
        > that I was referring to, but it looks like you're experienced
        enough to
        > handle these types :-) Sorry if you took offense it wasn't
        intended...
        > I'm blunt when I want to offend people ;-)
        >
        > Cool I can have fun too ;-)
        >
        > I'll tell you about Charles.
        > -------------------------
        > I have a moderate suburban back yard, it has a lawn with dead
        patches of
        > scorched earth from molten bronze spils, and where other
        experiments are
        > buried and have killed the roots of the grass :-\ My house may be
        a
        > modest four bedroom home, but I can say I own all of it :-) One
        lovely
        > wife and two very challenging children one with autism and the
        other
        > with aspergers, the one with autism also has ADHD, so she's a real
        > challenge ;-)
        >
        > The only rocks are the lightweight concrete rocks that I'm making
        at the
        > moment, imagine a boulder the size of a fridge that you can lift
        and
        > move around, but still having a lot of structural strength. I'm
        working
        > on a fish pond for my brother, I plan to cast up some ancient
        style
        > bronze fish that "spit" water into the pond, that kind of thing.
        I have
        > too many trees and the local council wont allow them to be removed
        as
        > they're natives, and removing natives is almost an impossible feat
        > legally to do :-(
        >
        > I recommend using poses with sledge hammer handles as a noob would
        most
        > probably hurt themselves with the real dead, and also to build the
        > necessary strength and muscle memory to wield "any" single handed
        melee
        > weapon, I train with metal weapons, and have done so for many,
        many
        > years, I also train with shaft weapons. I don't prescribe to
        rattan for
        > two reasons 1) for me it doesn't feel right in an historical
        context &
        > 2) rattan is usually harvested by slaves (I also don't buy stuff
        made by
        > child slave labour, so no Indian or Pakistani products for me).
        >
        > Learning casting has come in very handy for making bronze fittings
        for
        > pattern welded blades and the occasional piece of jewelry. My
        brother
        > and I are going to set up a reverb furnace in his back yard with a
        > minimum capacity of 30 kg of bronze, we want to do some sculpture
        and
        > some custom lawn furniture (got to have something to cover the
        dead
        > patches in my yard) ;-)
        >
        > It's funny that you mentioned garden implements (I have all the
        garden
        > toys by the way... even though I probably don't use them enough),
        most
        > of the most interesting pole weapons were developed from peasant
        farming
        > implements. I however don't find gardening implements that
        amusing, as
        > by association I relate them to continual maintenance of my yard
        and
        > trying to revive the dead earth. I thought a chain saw would be
        really
        > fun also (it's a guy thing), but was sadly disappointed :-(
        >
        > I also work for myself these days the IR laws in Oz can be really
        nasty
        > these days and I don't want to get involved with that cr*p.
        >
        > So this is me on the table, you don't have to be curious about me
        now or
        > try to figure me out from a couple of sentences, sure there is
        more to
        > me than the above, but that's enough for now.
        >
        >
        >
        > Regards Charles
        > P.S. My main issue at the moment is that I bought a tool box
        > yesterday, and am undecided as to whether to convert it into a
        micro
        > forge or a micro furnace ;-)
        >
      • Uncle Thor
        Farm implements were such good weapons that they made miltiary versions of them. For example, the military fork. It was a two- tine weapon, useful as a pole
        Message 3 of 18 , Oct 1, 2006
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          Farm implements were such good weapons that they made miltiary
          versions of them. For example, the military fork. It was a two-
          tine weapon, useful as a pole arm and for pushing ladders off
          parapets.

          Thoe

          --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, "Oliver T." <nitewalk@...> wrote:
          >
          > > Peasants and their garden implements won many a
          > > war against the nobility and their limited amounts
          > > of martial arms.
          >
          > Absolooterly! Forkin' loose hay from a hayfield up to a wagon,
          then
          > standing on the hay on the loaded wagon and forkin' it up into a
          haymow for
          > ten hours a day teaches a feller real quick about proper foot
          placement,
          > center of balance, center of mass, moments of inertia, rhythm and
          economy of
          > movement. If you do a poor job, you're hurtin'...do a bad job and
          you're
          > crippled...and quickly.
          > A decent-length pitchfork(any I ever used were at least eight
          feet long)
          > with a good ash handle and three, tough, flexible steel tines was
          a lethal
          > weapon(regular use sharpens the tines to a needle-point) in the
          hands of an
          > angry farmer.
          > The only fight I ever saw with pitchforks was over a farmer's
          > daughter...fight lasted all of 20 seconds, and ended with the
          loser's foot
          > pinned to the ground with the arch of the fork. When he looked
          down and
          > realized that the center tine had gone between his toes, he gave
          in...fast!
          > Clearin' land with an ax and brushhook, shovelin' taters or
          stackin'
          > pulpwood keeps a person fit and limber, but a pitchfork gives you
          reach...
          >
          > Oliver T.
          > Armstrong, NB
          >
        • Charles Anderson
          Hi Thor, Cool. I m going to cheat and run plastic tubes discretely through the fish, so a standard 90/10 Cu Sn will do fine, and get a nice patina toot sweet.
          Message 4 of 18 , Oct 1, 2006
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            Hi Thor,

            Cool.

            I'm going to cheat and run plastic tubes discretely through the fish, so
            a standard 90/10 Cu Sn will do fine, and get a nice patina toot sweet.
            Thanks for the link I'll check it out (always appreciate a good link).
            I use several media, investment plaster (I melt the wax out in the oven,
            than cook the mould under a foil lined flower pot for about 2 hours),
            petrobonded sand, and plain old black river sand, depending on the
            finish I want, or the time I have.

            The last time something fell into my baby furnace it vaporised before it
            hit the molten bronze (my burner and furnace setup is extremely time
            efficient, it s/melts 1.5 kg of bronze in 5-10 minutes). I have another
            furnace I built to prove the point that anyone can melt bronze anywhere,
            it's a micro furnace and is made from a powdered milk drink tin (can),
            takes about 1/2 an hour to make, the furnace is cheap and also s/melts
            bronze in 5- 10 minutes, however it's designed for a small crucible (250
            g) and is designed to melt precious metals (hence the size).

            Dow corning have a range of silicone rubbers that are pretty cool, the
            properties are controlled by the catalyst, I use one can't remember the
            product number at the mo', the catalyst I use makes the cure time 6-12
            hours, but allows you to mould "tin soldier" metal (pewter - leaded tin
            - whatever bakes your cookies), and is corrosion resistant... I've still
            got the first moulds I made 10 years ago, and they still work fine :-)

            I use gravity mostly, and have a chain on a stick for more detailed models.



            Regards Charles


            Uncle Thor wrote:

            >Charles,
            >
            >I took no offense. Just figured I ought to let folks know why this
            >project will work.
            >
            >Casting bronze that will be in water: I know there is an alloy in
            >that family of metals that can resist weather. They use it in
            >making track for garden railroads. (scroll down to the garden
            >railroad site at http://www.thortrains.net to see some - also get
            >ideas on something to highlight the pond) What do you use to make
            >the mold for bronze?
            >
            >As to trees: the reason I have to cast in the garage is trees. No
            >casting in the yard here. I can't have a leaf or seed pod falling
            >into the alloy. We have a bunch of trees in back. When we bought
            >this house, it was worse. The backyard looked like a jungle. Now it
            >looks civilized - got pics of it posted with the garden railroad
            >stuff.
            >
            >What I really need now is a suggestion for an RTV that will handle a
            >few hundred pours with a tin / lead alloy at no higher than 650 F,
            >and won't require me to use an yspecial tools suc has a vacuum
            >machine. There's a nifty set of antigue soldiers I want to recast.
            >
            >Well, let me run. My wide is calling for me for a trip to the
            >supermarket.
            >
            >Thor
            >
          • Steve
            ... Ouch. If your wiFe sees that typo, she ll be calling you for a trip to the doghouse. Steve
            Message 5 of 18 , Oct 6, 2006
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              --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, "Uncle Thor" <thortrains1@...> wrote:
              ...
              > Well, let me run. My wide is calling for me for a trip to the
              > supermarket.

              Ouch. If your wiFe sees that typo, she'll be calling you for a trip to
              the doghouse.

              Steve
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