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Using microballon fillers

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  • walt_gillespie
    I was wondering about the use of microballon fillers. What percentage do you normally use and do you add it to just one part of the resin or equally to both
    Message 1 of 6 , May 1, 2003
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      I was wondering about the use of microballon fillers. What
      percentage do you normally use and do you add it to just one part of
      the resin or equally to both parts.

      I purchased some light weight resin from MicroMark and was told it
      had microballons in it. Both parts seemed to contain the filler as
      they were both fluffy so to speak, not the usualy pancake syrup
      consitancy.

      Walt Gillespie
      www.rustystumps.com
    • The Tellurian
      How much you use depends on the resin and the end use. With thin epoxy I ve used .5-1:1 for 90% of the strength at half the weight [IMHO] to 4:1 [stiff
      Message 2 of 6 , May 1, 2003
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        How much you use depends on the resin and the end use. With thin epoxy
        I've used .5-1:1 for 90% of the strength at half the weight [IMHO] to
        4:1 [stiff peanutbutter to shapable] for a very light but not very
        strong nosecone. The more microballoon used the weaker the end result
        but easier to work as in sanding or shaping. I believe the reason for
        manufacturers mixing it in both parts is to provide easy 1:1 mix ratios
        so as not to confound their customers. I have mixed it in both halfs
        and after mixing the resins separately with the same results. Mixing
        the resins then adding the microballoons allows me better control of
        the mix proportions and blending, but thats just me. With
        polyurathanes that I've tried [Polytech] about 2.5:1 is the most as
        they are not as strong as epoxy and become too soft for my uses. A high
        strength urethane or different types may yield differing results.
        Polyester and white glues are weaker yet but have some uses. You need
        to balance end use/resin type/pourablity-stiffness verses workability
        after cure and the best way to do that is try it in small samples till
        you have what you think you need or can work with.

        Just don't sneeze in the open can!


        On Thu, 01 May 2003 12:30:31 -0000, walt_gillespie wrote:

        >I was wondering about the use of microballon fillers. What
        >percentage do you normally use and do you add it to just one part of
        >the resin or equally to both parts.
        >
        >I purchased some light weight resin from MicroMark and was told it
        >had microballons in it. Both parts seemed to contain the filler as
        >they were both fluffy so to speak, not the usualy pancake syrup
        >consitancy.
        >
        >Walt Gillespie
        >www.rustystumps.com

        The Tellurian
      • Casting Fool
        From: The Tellurian ... You mean that you actually found a way to open the can without getting microballoons all over the place?!
        Message 3 of 6 , May 1, 2003
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          From: "The Tellurian" <thetellurian@...>
          > Just don't sneeze in the open can!

          You mean that you actually found a way to open the can without getting
          microballoons all over the place?!

          Pray tell, Sir! What is your secret? ;O)

          TTFN - Mike Jackson
          Casting Fool & Son
          Augusta, GA USA
          http://www.cfnson.com
        • walt_gillespie
          Thanks, My use is for scenery items for model railroading. I found that the resin with microballons tended not to have airbubble problems as does the regular
          Message 4 of 6 , May 1, 2003
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            Thanks,

            My use is for scenery items for model railroading. I found that the
            resin with microballons tended not to have airbubble problems as
            does the regular resin. The resin I use (Alumilite regular) starts
            setting fairly fast so I need to add the microballons before mixing
            A & B. Other items I cast would not require the additive.

            Walt

            --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, "The Tellurian" <thetellurian@s...>
            wrote:
            > How much you use depends on the resin and the end use. With thin
            epoxy
            > I've used .5-1:1 for 90% of the strength at half the weight [IMHO]
            to
            > 4:1 [stiff peanutbutter to shapable] for a very light but not very
            > strong nosecone. The more microballoon used the weaker the end
            result
            > but easier to work as in sanding or shaping. I believe the reason
            for
            > manufacturers mixing it in both parts is to provide easy 1:1 mix
            ratios
            > so as not to confound their customers. I have mixed it in both
            halfs
            > and after mixing the resins separately with the same results.
            Mixing
            > the resins then adding the microballoons allows me better control
            of
            > the mix proportions and blending, but thats just me. With
            > polyurathanes that I've tried [Polytech] about 2.5:1 is the most as
            > they are not as strong as epoxy and become too soft for my uses. A
            high
            > strength urethane or different types may yield differing results.
            > Polyester and white glues are weaker yet but have some uses. You
            need
            > to balance end use/resin type/pourablity-stiffness verses
            workability
            > after cure and the best way to do that is try it in small samples
            till
            > you have what you think you need or can work with.
            >
            > Just don't sneeze in the open can!
            >
            >
            > On Thu, 01 May 2003 12:30:31 -0000, walt_gillespie wrote:
            >
            > >I was wondering about the use of microballon fillers. What
            > >percentage do you normally use and do you add it to just one part
            of
            > >the resin or equally to both parts.
            > >
            > >I purchased some light weight resin from MicroMark and was told
            it
            > >had microballons in it. Both parts seemed to contain the filler
            as
            > >they were both fluffy so to speak, not the usualy pancake syrup
            > >consitancy.
            > >
            > >Walt Gillespie
            > >www.rustystumps.com
            >
            > The Tellurian
          • walt_gillespie
            NO, No! (chuckle) This was already mixed but you did open my eyes to a possible future challenge of a mass attack of microballons. Maybe it would be a good
            Message 5 of 6 , May 1, 2003
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              NO, No! (chuckle) This was already mixed but you did open my eyes to
              a possible future "challenge" of a mass attack of microballons.

              Maybe it would be a good idea to put the can of microballons inside
              a plastic bag then open it. that wouldn't stop the spill but at
              least contain it! (grin)

              Walt

              --- In casting@yahoogroups.com, "Casting Fool" <jester@c...> wrote:
              > From: "The Tellurian" <thetellurian@s...>
              > > Just don't sneeze in the open can!
              >
              > You mean that you actually found a way to open the can without
              getting
              > microballoons all over the place?!
              >
              > Pray tell, Sir! What is your secret? ;O)
              >
              > TTFN - Mike Jackson
              > Casting Fool & Son
              > Augusta, GA USA
              > http://www.cfnson.com
            • The Tellurian
              ... Close the windows, close the doors, shut off any furnace/AC/fans, make very slow deliberate movements, and wear a dust mask or respirator [NOT the cheap
              Message 6 of 6 , May 1, 2003
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                >You mean that you actually found a way to open the can without getting
                >microballoons all over the place?!
                >
                >Pray tell, Sir! What is your secret? ;O)

                Close the windows, close the doors, shut off any furnace/AC/fans, make
                very slow deliberate movements, and wear a dust mask or respirator [NOT
                the cheap ones you can see through either] and pray a lot. ;-P Or try
                to find a different grade, some are finer/lighter but some seem to be
                more heavy, Theres also besides glass, ceramic bubbles which I believe
                is the brown coloured stuff. Actually I just open it in my little
                painting area where theres an exhaust fan and let it get sucked
                outside.

                >I've never used microballoons, but I've heard that you should wear a
                >respirator mask when handling them, as it's not a good thing to get the
                >stuff in your lungs, and they're easily inhaled. Is this the straight
                >skinny or just some old caster's wife's tale?

                Do a search for "silicosis" and decide for yourself. I have done sand
                blasting and still do heavy cutting and grinding so must take extra
                precautions. The occasional or rare use is probably not worrisome but
                its your lungs.



                The Tellurian
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