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That industrial pantograph...

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  • garydeal
    Boy, talk about starting something! Ok, lemme see here, I just got in from the garage, where I went after work, and I know it s been hours since I last saw
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 1, 2001
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      Boy, talk about starting something!
      Ok, lemme see here, I just got in from the garage, where I went
      after work, and I know it's been hours since I last saw what was up
      here...
      >Gorton made at least 2 3D machines. The large one that you talked about was
      the P-2-3 model.
      Yup, Gorton made a whole variety of machines, most of which I've
      never even seen in a picture. I think the 2-3 was the latest and greatest
      of their true 3D machines. The P1-3 is a heavier version of a P1-2, and
      I've actually seen one of those in person and declined to buy it. I do
      know someone who bought a P2-3, and he says "The P 2-3 Is as big as an
      elephant , and weighs 2400 Lbs."
      I stole a photo of one, it's here <www.9000shops.com/P23.jpg>
      The master would be attached to the table on the right, the part
      would be cut on the table in the center, and the reduction ratio has to
      be set on the pantograph as well as that big arm that goes across the top
      - that's the item that takes care of the vertical reduction.
      > I have not seen all of Gorton's pantograph models but I have never seen
      >one that would reduce more than ten to one.
      Larry, the P1-2, probably the most common today, is usually only
      marked to eight or ten to one, the accessory "reduction setting gage"
      goes down to sixteen to one (I just checked mine), and using the formulae
      included in the manual it's possible to calculate reduction settings far
      too extreme to even accurately set on the machine. Theoretically the
      machine has an infinite reduction ratio possible, because it can be
      adjusted beyond the bearing axis. Of course, there's no point in this,
      and anything beyond about twenty to one is difficult to work with.

      Ok, I found the link, and the info may be truncated from when I
      first saw it, but I did screw up on the size. It was .005". The master
      that was used was two inches in diameter, so the reduction ratio used to
      go from master to part had to be four hundred to one. Sounds like a fun
      idea, but I'm glad I didn't have to set that one up.
      Here's the link: http://www.air-logic.com/pinstory.html

      These machines are interesting, and if you are able to thrive on
      extreme tedium, can be fun to use. To operate a P1-2, you don't stand
      back and work the handles, you have to wrap yourself around the machine
      in a relatively uncomfortable position and stick your face right in there
      where the cutter's turning at 18,000 rpm. It takes some getting used to.
      My neck and back only hurt really bad for about the first year and a
      half, my shoulders leveled out again after about six months, and the
      lower half of my left hand and forearm was quite numb until I figured out
      what was causing it and started putting a pad under my elbow. I also
      learned how to move the tiny comb shaped stainless chips over to the
      corners of my eyes so I could take them all out at once instead of
      spending half my time getting each one as it went in. Eight years of
      using the things and I'd spent more time in intimate contact with them
      than with my wife. Two months after changing industries I realized that I
      missed the machines, and eventually got one of my own. I was even having
      dreams about them...
      On a more positive note, I needed to make a 1/6 scale horseshoe. I
      bought a full size horseshoe, drilled some holes in it, screwed it to the
      wooden table I'd attached to the machine for this purpose, set the
      machine for a six to one reduction, selected the proper stylus and
      cutters, and cut the miniature out of some brass. If you'd like a look at
      this, scroll to the bottom of this page <
      http://www.riorondo.com/general/onesixth.html>. The "US" rosette on the
      cavalry bit is about 1/8" in diameter, and is machined, not etched. It
      was a problem, but I need to upgrade some of my tooling.

      Cripes, it's late! I gotta go get some sleep, you people be sure to
      have fun. (and why the heck is the water turned off at 3am? I can't even
      wash my hands!)
      -Gary

      **Never, Ever Stop**
    • Don Winter
      Bunch of pantographs on eBay right now. Don Winter, 7/8n2
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 1, 2001
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        Bunch of pantographs on eBay right now.
        Don Winter, 7/8n2
      • lawrence Jackman
        The P-1-3 is not a larger version of the P-1-2. It is a true 3D machine. Where did you see the P-1-3. Is it still for sale? A P-1-3 is just a P-1-2 with the
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 1, 2001
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          The P-1-3 is not a larger version of the P-1-2. It is a true 3D machine.
          Where did you see the P-1-3. Is it still for sale? A P-1-3 is just a
          P-1-2 with the extra stuff added to make it a P-1-3. Both machines are
          P-1 in size and the -2 or -3 is added to the model number so you know if
          you are talking about 2D or 3D.
          I ran a 2D machine years ago but do not remember the model number. We
          even locked the arms down and used it as a mill when all the mills in
          the shop were tied up.
          Thank you.
          Larry Jackman

          garydeal wrote:
          >
          > Boy, talk about starting something!
          > Ok, lemme see here, I just got in from the g
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