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The importance of integrated and surrounding agriculture

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  • Will
    Because of peak oil, localization of agriculture is a foregone conclusion. One superb benefit of carfree cities is the amount of open space around and between
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 28, 2006
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      Because of peak oil, localization of agriculture is a foregone
      conclusion. One superb benefit of carfree cities is the amount of
      open space around and between each of the districts. Indeed, even
      within districts, courtyards could have urban gardens and shade
      providing fruit and nut trees. One book that examines the
      relationship of agriculture and sustainable cities is "CPULs -
      Continuous Productive Urban Landscapes" - Andre Viljoen (2006).
      http://www.energybulletin.net/17603.html

      One could envision each district have a farmer's market day in a
      central square, with easy access to/from surrounding fields. Perhaps
      there might even be planting and harvest times where adolescents pause
      their schooling to help in the fields. While not in the immediate
      future, a return to animal traction (i.e., draft horses) is not
      unthinkable. Collection of human wastes could be converted into rich
      fertilizer, reducing even further the reliance on petro-chemicals.
      Even people with balconies could have small, multi-layered "lasagna"
      gardens.
      http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0875968864/sr=8-2/qid=1151526077/ref=pd_bbs_2/104-6001946-2517561?ie=UTF8

      It's good to be back...

      Will Stewart
    • Todd Edelman
      Will wrote: ... PRODUCING biogas methane from animal (and possibly human) waste, agricultural waste etc is somewhat well-known, but what is less-known is that
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 28, 2006
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        Will wrote:
        ... While not in the immediate
        > future, a return to animal traction (i.e., draft horses) is not
        > unthinkable. Collection of human wastes could be converted into rich
        > fertilizer, reducing even further the reliance on petro-chemicals.
        >

        PRODUCING biogas methane from animal (and possibly human) waste,
        agricultural waste etc is somewhat well-known, but what is less-known is
        that the OTHER product of the process is solid matter, which is rich
        fertilizer...

        It seems to be on the decline, but animal traction will increase in the EU
        when Bulgaria and Romania join. Vegans/animal rights folks might object,
        but I have heard great things about the efficiency of draft horses etc if
        their wastes are also utilised. As far as "taxis" go, the clop-clop,
        clop-clop of horses on cobblestones is a nice thing, but I am not sure
        about the smell, and if it can be contained...

        T

        p.s. Finally Will, the carfree cities in "Carfree Cities" are just one
        type (or series) of design, but I imagine all new ones will have lots of
        green areas very nearby...

        ------------------------------------------------------

        Todd Edelman
        Director
        Green Idea Factory

        ++420 605 915 970

        edelman@...
        http://www.worldcarfree.net/onthetrain

        Green Idea Factory,
        a member of World Carfree Network
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