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"I can't afford my gasoline"

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  • howardgoodell
    Hi -- An extra $1 or $2 for gas is worth 1000 sermons about the evils of cars. Here s a link I just got from a blue-collar, pickup-driving, staunch Republican:
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 25, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi --

      An extra $1 or $2 for gas is worth 1000 sermons about the evils of
      cars. Here's a link I just got from a blue-collar, pickup-driving,
      staunch Republican:
      http://www.atomfilms.com/contentPlay/shockwave.jsp?id=cant_afford_gas&preplay

      If they continue, as they seem likely to, high oil prices will make a
      lot of people who never did before question their blind faith in the
      automobile. It's a good time to present car alternatives as a
      solution. "For there is no real education that does not respond to
      felt need...." (Allan Bloom, _The Closing of the American Mind_) --
      it's time to educate!

      Dr. Howard Goodell
      Computer Science Department
      University of Massachusetts at Lowell
    • Bling Williams
      Good link :-) Wonder how things will fare when American gasoline reaches the prices the rest of the world pay? It doesn t stop Brits from driving when they pay
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 26, 2006
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        Good link :-)
        Wonder how things will fare when American gasoline reaches the prices the rest of the world pay? It doesn't stop Brits from driving when they pay $6-$8 a gallon though and the average income here is lower. The congestion charge stopped some poeple driving. So Maybe higher prices, congestion charges, pay to drive etc might eventually have an impact?

        S

        howardgoodell <howie.goodell@...> wrote:
        Hi --

        An extra $1 or $2 for gas is worth 1000 sermons about the evils of
        cars. Here's a link I just got from a blue-collar, pickup-driving,
        staunch Republican:
        http://www.atomfilms.com/contentPlay/shockwave.jsp?id=cant_afford_gas&preplay

        If they continue, as they seem likely to, high oil prices will make a
        lot of people who never did before question their blind faith in the
        automobile. It's a good time to present car alternatives as a
        solution. "For there is no real education that does not respond to
        felt need...." (Allan Bloom, _The Closing of the American Mind_) --
        it's time to educate!

        Dr. Howard Goodell
        Computer Science Department
        University of Massachusetts at Lowell






        Yahoo! Groups Links









        http://nobravery.cf.huffingtonpost.com/

        www.celyn.org

        ---------------------------------
        How low will we go? Check out Yahoo! Messenger’s low PC-to-Phone call rates.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jack Barbour
        I lived in England for 4 years, traveled all over the place and never miss owning or having access to an automobile. Most of the British I knew during this
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 26, 2006
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          I lived in England for 4 years, traveled all over the place and never
          miss owning or having access to an automobile. Most of the British I
          knew during this period who owned a car, pretty much left it parked
          except for specific occasions. But at least during this time period,
          the early 70's the country had an awesome public transportation
          infrastructure. In suburban America, the public transportation
          infrastructure, if it exist at all, primary function is to get workers
          from the dense metropolitan area to their service jobs in the wealthy
          suburbs and back again with the smallest outgo of "tax-payer" money.

          Until the cost of private transportation shadows the ignorance and
          social bigotry of American automobile owners I see little chance of any
          change in true transportation alternative. I am constantly amazed at
          what people are willing to give up in order to fill up their gas tank.
          Only when the credit cards are tapped out and travel is restricted on
          the amount of gas they are able to obtain for the week or month will we
          start to see a change.

          The mantra of the American Suburbs, "They will take my SUV away went
          they pry cold dead foot from the gas pedal".

          Jack Barbour


          -----Original Message-----
          From: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bling Williams
          Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2006 6:14 AM
          To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [carfree_cities] "I can't afford my gasoline"

          Good link :-)
          Wonder how things will fare when American gasoline reaches the prices
          the rest of the world pay? It doesn't stop Brits from driving when they
          pay $6-$8 a gallon though and the average income here is lower. The
          congestion charge stopped some poeple driving. So Maybe higher prices,
          congestion charges, pay to drive etc might eventually have an impact?

          S

          howardgoodell <howie.goodell@...> wrote:
          Hi --

          An extra $1 or $2 for gas is worth 1000 sermons about the evils of
          cars. Here's a link I just got from a blue-collar, pickup-driving,
          staunch Republican:
          http://www.atomfilms.com/contentPlay/shockwave.jsp?id=cant_afford_gas&pr
          eplay

          If they continue, as they seem likely to, high oil prices will make a
          lot of people who never did before question their blind faith in the
          automobile. It's a good time to present car alternatives as a
          solution. "For there is no real education that does not respond to
          felt need...." (Allan Bloom, _The Closing of the American Mind_) --
          it's time to educate!

          Dr. Howard Goodell
          Computer Science Department
          University of Massachusetts at Lowell






          Yahoo! Groups Links









          http://nobravery.cf.huffingtonpost.com/

          www.celyn.org

          ---------------------------------
          How low will we go? Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call
          rates.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          Yahoo! Groups Links
        • Bling Williams
          It has changed sinced the 70 s when gettng the car out was a weekend thing and somehwt special. PT has got bad since they privatised it all and car ownership
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 26, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            It has changed sinced the 70's when 'gettng the car out' was a weekend thing and somehwt special. PT has got bad since they privatised it all and car ownership has rocketed. hopefully we can put the brakes on before we lose it all but judging by the out of town supermarkets, bus company takeovers and suburban development we might have a disaster on our hands in the American style before the oil runs out :-(

            Mums now run kids half a mile to school becuase of the percieved traffic danger, people demand houses with a garage etc. Its very depressing.

            S

            Jack Barbour <bamacyclist@...> wrote:
            I lived in England for 4 years, traveled all over the place and never
            miss owning or having access to an automobile. Most of the British I
            knew during this period who owned a car, pretty much left it parked
            except for specific occasions. But at least during this time period,
            the early 70's the country had an awesome public transportation
            infrastructure. In suburban America, the public transportation
            infrastructure, if it exist at all, primary function is to get workers
            from the dense metropolitan area to their service jobs in the wealthy
            suburbs and back again with the smallest outgo of "tax-payer" money.

            Until the cost of private transportation shadows the ignorance and
            social bigotry of American automobile owners I see little chance of any
            change in true transportation alternative. I am constantly amazed at
            what people are willing to give up in order to fill up their gas tank.
            Only when the credit cards are tapped out and travel is restricted on
            the amount of gas they are able to obtain for the week or month will we
            start to see a change.

            The mantra of the American Suburbs, "They will take my SUV away went
            they pry cold dead foot from the gas pedal".

            Jack Barbour


            -----Original Message-----
            From: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bling Williams
            Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2006 6:14 AM
            To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [carfree_cities] "I can't afford my gasoline"

            Good link :-)
            Wonder how things will fare when American gasoline reaches the prices
            the rest of the world pay? It doesn't stop Brits from driving when they
            pay $6-$8 a gallon though and the average income here is lower. The
            congestion charge stopped some poeple driving. So Maybe higher prices,
            congestion charges, pay to drive etc might eventually have an impact?

            S

            howardgoodell wrote:
            Hi --

            An extra $1 or $2 for gas is worth 1000 sermons about the evils of
            cars. Here's a link I just got from a blue-collar, pickup-driving,
            staunch Republican:
            http://www.atomfilms.com/contentPlay/shockwave.jsp?id=cant_afford_gas&pr
            eplay

            If they continue, as they seem likely to, high oil prices will make a
            lot of people who never did before question their blind faith in the
            automobile. It's a good time to present car alternatives as a
            solution. "For there is no real education that does not respond to
            felt need...." (Allan Bloom, _The Closing of the American Mind_) --
            it's time to educate!

            Dr. Howard Goodell
            Computer Science Department
            University of Massachusetts at Lowell






            Yahoo! Groups Links









            http://nobravery.cf.huffingtonpost.com/

            www.celyn.org

            ---------------------------------
            How low will we go? Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call
            rates.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            Yahoo! Groups Links









            Yahoo! Groups Links









            http://nobravery.cf.huffingtonpost.com/

            www.celyn.org

            ---------------------------------
            New Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Call regular phones from your PC and save big.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jack Barbour
            That is a shame; I lived in Marlow, but work in High Wycombe. The last bus ran bus ran around 10:25 PM, so if I missed it, then I had a long walk home. After
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 26, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              That is a shame; I lived in Marlow, but work in High Wycombe. The last
              bus ran bus ran around 10:25 PM, so if I missed it, then I had a long
              walk home. After a few missed busses, it reached a point where I
              wouldn't even attempt to catch the bus since the walk was so pleasant.
              Horses running in the moonlight and the earthly smells of the local
              farms I passed were akin to strolling in a fantasy land that I had only
              read about in books. In order to get to my flat, I traveled down West
              Street, pass the house were Mary Shelly completed Frankenstein.
              Opposite the house was a great stone wall, and I'm walking along on a
              snowy night about 2:00 am with thoughts and visions of monsters and mad
              scientist running away with my imagination and just as I pass the Shelly
              house, one of those big damn halogen street lamps blew out with a bang
              right above my head. I think I managed to cover the last mile and half
              to my flat without leaving a single footprint in the snow. That memory
              along with those consisting standing on the suspension bridge next to
              the Compleat Angler watching the Thames flowing below, sitting on High
              Street and reading T.S. Elliot, knowing the he may had walked and cycled
              along those very roads and street. I have many wonderful memories of my
              commutes to and from work that would have never have come to pass if my
              trips had consisted of inclosing myself on a cage of steel.

              Jack Barbour


              -----Original Message-----
              From: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bling Williams
              Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2006 10:24 AM
              To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [carfree_cities] "I can't afford my gasoline"

              It has changed sinced the 70's when 'gettng the car out' was a weekend
              thing and somehwt special. PT has got bad since they privatised it all
              and car ownership has rocketed. hopefully we can put the brakes on
              before we lose it all but judging by the out of town supermarkets, bus
              company takeovers and suburban development we might have a disaster on
              our hands in the American style before the oil runs out :-(

              Mums now run kids half a mile to school becuase of the percieved
              traffic danger, people demand houses with a garage etc. Its very
              depressing.

              S

              Jack Barbour <bamacyclist@...> wrote:
              I lived in England for 4 years, traveled all over the place and never
              miss owning or having access to an automobile. Most of the British I
              knew during this period who owned a car, pretty much left it parked
              except for specific occasions. But at least during this time period,
              the early 70's the country had an awesome public transportation
              infrastructure. In suburban America, the public transportation
              infrastructure, if it exist at all, primary function is to get workers
              from the dense metropolitan area to their service jobs in the wealthy
              suburbs and back again with the smallest outgo of "tax-payer" money.

              Until the cost of private transportation shadows the ignorance and
              social bigotry of American automobile owners I see little chance of any
              change in true transportation alternative. I am constantly amazed at
              what people are willing to give up in order to fill up their gas tank.
              Only when the credit cards are tapped out and travel is restricted on
              the amount of gas they are able to obtain for the week or month will we
              start to see a change.

              The mantra of the American Suburbs, "They will take my SUV away went
              they pry cold dead foot from the gas pedal".

              Jack Barbour


              -----Original Message-----
              From: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bling Williams
              Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2006 6:14 AM
              To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [carfree_cities] "I can't afford my gasoline"

              Good link :-)
              Wonder how things will fare when American gasoline reaches the prices
              the rest of the world pay? It doesn't stop Brits from driving when they
              pay $6-$8 a gallon though and the average income here is lower. The
              congestion charge stopped some poeple driving. So Maybe higher prices,
              congestion charges, pay to drive etc might eventually have an impact?

              S

              howardgoodell wrote:
              Hi --

              An extra $1 or $2 for gas is worth 1000 sermons about the evils of
              cars. Here's a link I just got from a blue-collar, pickup-driving,
              staunch Republican:
              http://www.atomfilms.com/contentPlay/shockwave.jsp?id=cant_afford_gas&pr
              eplay

              If they continue, as they seem likely to, high oil prices will make a
              lot of people who never did before question their blind faith in the
              automobile. It's a good time to present car alternatives as a
              solution. "For there is no real education that does not respond to
              felt need...." (Allan Bloom, _The Closing of the American Mind_) --
              it's time to educate!

              Dr. Howard Goodell
              Computer Science Department
              University of Massachusetts at Lowell






              Yahoo! Groups Links









              http://nobravery.cf.huffingtonpost.com/

              www.celyn.org

              ---------------------------------
              How low will we go? Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call
              rates.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              Yahoo! Groups Links









              Yahoo! Groups Links









              http://nobravery.cf.huffingtonpost.com/

              www.celyn.org

              ---------------------------------
              New Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Call regular phones from your PC and
              save big.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              Yahoo! Groups Links
            • Dan Kliman
              ... I doubt the US government will let it get that far. Americans have a very low tolerance for paying for gas, and already this has become a major issue for
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 26, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                --- Bling Williams <bobalinga@...> wrote:

                > Good link :-)
                > Wonder how things will fare when American gasoline
                > reaches the prices the rest of the world pay?

                I doubt the US government will let it get that far.
                Americans have a very low tolerance for paying for
                gas, and already this has become a major issue for
                Bush.

                Despite not even reaching half of what Europeans pay
                for gas, the rise in prices is convincing people to
                drive less, at least according to this article in San
                Francisco's paper of record, the SF Chronicle
                http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/04/22/MNGH9IDLVS1.DTL&hw=gas+prices&sn=088&sc=196

                This shows what we already suspected -- raise the
                prices and people drive less and think about
                conservation. It also confirms another thing we
                suspected -- a switch to hybrid cars or other vehicles
                with higher mileage per gallon will only encourage
                people to drive more.

                Dan
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