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Taurus vs civic gets the boot

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  • Ian Fiddies
    Let s assume that someone must have a car for some reason. Maybe someone just lives in ... Since I live near downtown only 8 km out, even though I live in an
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 7, 2006
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      Let's assume that someone must have a car for some reason. Maybe someone
      just lives in
      > an auto-centric city, or maybe someone lives in a (real) small town or
      > rural area.
      >
      > I have a 1993 Ford Taurus (gift; I did not pick it). I've seen it get as
      > low as 12 miles per
      > gallon, since I live near downtown and have to slog through a lot of
      > stop-and-go no

      Since I live near downtown only 8 km out, even though I live in an
      auto-centric city I don't drive! I don't even let someone give me a lift
      unless they're going in my direction. I've got a really good pair of ex-army
      boots and my footprint I quiet large, size 14. Because I don't walk much,
      slightly less than 5000km a year I feel it would be unnecessary to buy
      purchase new boots every year and get by with a rehealing once a year. Of
      course walking is for peasants and only an idiot like me would use it as a
      means of transport in a modern town.



      I do own a couple of bikes and live within a mile of a bus that runs once an
      hour so if I'm in a hurry due to bad planning I can ride. Problem with
      refusing to drive a nasty smelly death machine because they're destroying
      our planet and mutilating our social interactivity etc. is that it makes you
      really hate cars and the idiots that drive them. They don't half spoil the
      joys of pedestrian mobility.



      Freedom of movement is one of the UN's human rights. I think that even
      includes carfree types like some of us. Since everyone lives in a
      municipally governed area, it must be reasonable to demand some kind of
      transport infrastructure to facilitate movement. The argument loses a great
      deal of power it the arguer has a car blocking up their drive.



      Ian Fiddies
    • Richard Risemberg
      ... Indeed. I am reminded of the old Disney short--forgot the name, but it involves Goofy as the kind Mr. Walker who turns into the raging moron Mr. Wheeler
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 7, 2006
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        On Mar 7, 2006, at 12:59 AM, Ian Fiddies wrote:

        > I do own a couple of bikes and live within a mile of a bus that
        > runs once an
        > hour so if I'm in a hurry due to bad planning I can ride. Problem with
        > refusing to drive a nasty smelly death machine because they're
        > destroying
        > our planet and mutilating our social interactivity etc. is that it
        > makes you
        > really hate cars and the idiots that drive them. They don't half
        > spoil the
        > joys of pedestrian mobility

        Indeed. I am reminded of the old Disney short--forgot the name, but
        it involves Goofy as the kind Mr. Walker who turns into the raging
        moron Mr. Wheeler wwhen he gets in his car. I think it was trying to
        promote auto-gentility, which I find to be a concept without basis in
        fact.

        FYI, Sprol.com published an article of mine on bicycling in Los
        Angeles, which you can read here:

        http://www.sprol.com/?p=292#more-292

        > The argument loses a great
        > deal of power it the arguer has a car blocking up their drive.

        I have an internet acquaintance who lives in upstate New York and
        travels only by bike, foot, ski, and train. (He rides all winter
        with studded bike tires, common in Northern Europe). He said his
        neighbors always told him that "you can't live here without a car,"
        so he bought an old (and I believe inoperative) car, put it in his
        driveway, and left it there. He now has a car--but never drives it.

        I like that sort of humor.

        Rick
        --
        Richard Risemberg
        http://www.rickrise.com
        http://www.newcolonist.com
        http://www.living-room.org
      • Brett Breitwieser
        I think it could be said that Phoenix is extremely car-centric... suburban sprawl (Phoenix is now the 7th most populous city in the USA)... completely designed
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 7, 2006
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          I think it could be said that Phoenix is extremely car-centric...
          suburban sprawl (Phoenix is now the 7th most populous city in the USA)...
          completely designed around the auto and the freeway.

          But there are some redeeming feautures.
          First there are extensive bikepaths that parallel the 1000 year old canal
          system.
          (Thank-you Hohokam Indians!)
          Secondly, Phoenix is modeled after the desert: endless repetitions of the
          same
          pattern: the same fast-food joints, discount stores, Starbucks coffee shops,
          banks,
          groceries stores every 10 miles or so....

          This means that as the car-based system breaks down, or individuals choose
          to go
          carfree, they have good facilities within easy reach....

          The suburban sprawl can be made to break down into an endless array of local
          villages...

          Hope for the future...

          Brett

          -----Original Message-----
          From: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Ian Fiddies
          Sent: Tuesday, March 07, 2006 1:59 AM
          To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [carfree_cities] Taurus vs civic gets the boot





          Let's assume that someone must have a car for some reason. Maybe someone
          just lives in
          > an auto-centric city, or maybe someone lives in a (real) small town or
          > rural area.
          >
          > I have a 1993 Ford Taurus (gift; I did not pick it). I've seen it get as
          > low as 12 miles per
          > gallon, since I live near downtown and have to slog through a lot of
          > stop-and-go no

          Since I live near downtown only 8 km out, even though I live in an
          auto-centric city I don't drive! I don't even let someone give me a lift
          unless they're going in my direction. I've got a really good pair of ex-army
          boots and my footprint I quiet large, size 14. Because I don't walk much,
          slightly less than 5000km a year I feel it would be unnecessary to buy
          purchase new boots every year and get by with a rehealing once a year. Of
          course walking is for peasants and only an idiot like me would use it as a
          means of transport in a modern town.



          I do own a couple of bikes and live within a mile of a bus that runs once an
          hour so if I'm in a hurry due to bad planning I can ride. Problem with
          refusing to drive a nasty smelly death machine because they're destroying
          our planet and mutilating our social interactivity etc. is that it makes you
          really hate cars and the idiots that drive them. They don't half spoil the
          joys of pedestrian mobility.



          Freedom of movement is one of the UN's human rights. I think that even
          includes carfree types like some of us. Since everyone lives in a
          municipally governed area, it must be reasonable to demand some kind of
          transport infrastructure to facilitate movement. The argument loses a great
          deal of power it the arguer has a car blocking up their drive.



          Ian Fiddies








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