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Re: [carfree_cities] Re: Linear motor trains

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  • J.H. Crawford
    ... I m not sure LIM really has much to do with it. It does give lighter cars, as the propulsion is mostly stationary. What s needed is wheels that turn
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 1, 2005
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      >So, my question is, can we have the advantages of a LIM line as per
      >the article, and also
      >have a relatively quiet ride?

      I'm not sure LIM really has much to do with it. It does
      give lighter cars, as the propulsion is mostly stationary.

      What's needed is wheels that turn independently, so that
      when going around curves one wheel does not have to slip.
      That's what makes the noise, mostly.

      Regards,


      ------ ### -----
      J.H. Crawford Carfree Cities
      mailbox@... http://www.carfree.com
    • tokyotuds
      Ahhh, I see... independent wheels. I sure wish they had used independent wheels on the Oedo Line. But certainly they got a lot right. It s the Oedo Line I
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 1, 2005
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        Ahhh, I see... independent wheels. I sure wish they had used independent wheels on the
        Oedo Line. But certainly they got a lot right. It's the Oedo Line I used recently as a
        specific example of a loop line that has clear signage so passengers know which train to
        hop on.

        Cheers,
        Tuds


        --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "J.H. Crawford" <mailbox@c...> wrote:
        >
        > >So, my question is, can we have the advantages of a LIM line as per
        > >the article, and also
        > >have a relatively quiet ride?
        >
        > I'm not sure LIM really has much to do with it. It does
        > give lighter cars, as the propulsion is mostly stationary.
        >
        > What's needed is wheels that turn independently, so that
        > when going around curves one wheel does not have to slip.
        > That's what makes the noise, mostly.
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        >
        > ------ ### -----
        > J.H. Crawford Carfree Cities
        > mailbox@c... http://www.carfree.com
      • Tony Godshall
        According to Robert Madison, ... Cars may be cheaper but track is more expensive (the motor is built into the track, not the car). I d think they d be easier
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 1, 2005
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          According to Robert Madison,
          > on 31-Jul-05 18:17 J.H. Crawford said the following:
          >
          > >Hi All,
          > >
          > >Does anyone know more about "linear motor trains"?
          > >
          > >Regards,
          > >
          > >
          >
          > I couldn't describe all the details, but linear induction motors (LIMs)
          > are in use in Vancouver, BC, on the SkyTrain; Detroit, MI, on the People
          > Mover; Toronto, ON, on the SRT; and New York on the JFK AirTrain, among
          > others (all built by Bombardier/predecessors).
          >
          > The article seemed to give the basic details on how they work. I'm no
          > scientist, but the best explanation I've seen is that the LIM (which,
          > IIRC, is on the track and not on the railcars themselves) is like a
          > large electrical coil unrolled and laid flat between the two guiderails.
          >
          > It's actually a pretty good system, because it doesn't rely on traction
          > of steel wheel on steel rail, so LIM-powered trains can climb steeper
          > grades at higher speeds than traditional rail.

          Cars may be cheaper but track is more expensive (the motor
          is built into the track, not the car). I'd think they'd be
          easier to justify for high-density areas.

          LIMs do exist, as noted above on various short heavy-use
          routes, esp. airports (as noted above) and rollercoasters.

          Maglevs are generally LIM-powered but LIMS are not
          necessarily maglevs.
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