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Linear motor trains

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  • J.H. Crawford
    Hi All, Does anyone know more about linear motor trains ? Regards, http://home.kyodo.co.jp/modules/fstStory/index.php?storyid=191954 Linear motor trains
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 31, 2005
      Hi All,

      Does anyone know more about "linear motor trains"?

      Regards,



      http://home.kyodo.co.jp/modules/fstStory/index.php?storyid=191954

      Linear motor trains introduced successively
      TOKYO, July 14 KYODO
      Linear motor trains, which do not float on rails, are increasingly introduced to subways in major cities because of their safety and lower construction costs, while floating ones, called magnetically levitated (maglev) trains, whose research began 40 years ago and dubbed ''dream superexpress trains,'' appear to require considerable time before they can be practical due to huge costs.
      A linear motor train in subways is driven by the magnetic field generated by an electric current sent into coils attached to the cars and a magnetic field generated at metal plates fixed to tracks.
      When the driver pushes a starting button, the train automatically runs to a fixed position at the next station and its safety is quite high.
      Called ''Linear Metro,'' the train made its first debut in the Osaka municipal subway in 1990, and has been introduced to Tokyo's Oedo subway and the municipal subways at Kobe and Fukuoka. Sendai and Yokohama are preparing to introduce the train.
      ''The construction cost can be curbed as cars and the tunnel section can be made smaller because there is no motor under the floor,'' said Motoo Kusakari, a section chief of the car electricity division at the Transportation Bureau of the Tokyo metropolitan government, recalling the construction of the Oedo line which opened in 2000.
      ''There had been no restriction to steep grades or to sharp curves. We could thus plan lines deep underground,'' he said. The train runs 42 meters underground in some places.
      In the meantime, development of the floating maglev train began by now-defunct Japanese National Railways (JNR), and one of its successors, Central Japan Railway Co. (JR Tokai), began a full-scale running test on an experimental track in Yamanashi Prefecture in 1997, and the world's fastest speed of 581 kilometers per hour has been recorded.
      The train floats 10 centimeters above the track with a superconductive magnet of cars and a magnetic power of coils on the ground, and runs on the U-shaped guideway. There is no derailment with automatic driving, ensuring high safety.
      The practical use technology assessment committee of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport gave an official guarantee to the train in March, saying, ''It can be judged that basic technologies for its practical use have been established,'' but the construction of a 500-kilometer-long guideway between Tokyo and Osaka is said to require 10 trillion yen.
      A ministry official said there are many steep mountains in the areas and considerable time is needed to survey geological and geographical features.
      ''JR Tokai cannot make whole investments. The problem is how to rouse public opinion and to what extent the governmental funds can be procured,'' said Denshi Takeuchi, a promoter of the project and a professor at Gifu University.
      Maglev trains have been used only by the Shanghai Linear and Aichi Rapid Transit. The trains float about 1 centimeter.
      The fee for the Shanghai Linear linking Shanghai and the international airport is expensive, and the rate of occupancy is 20 percent on average.
      The linear motor train line introduced at the 2005 World Exposition in Aichi Prefecture cost about 100 billion yen, but it is feared that the number of users will decrease after the end of the exposition in September.
      ==Kyodo



      ------ ### -----
      J.H. Crawford Carfree Cities
      mailbox@... http://www.carfree.com
    • Robert Madison
      ... I couldn t describe all the details, but linear induction motors (LIMs) are in use in Vancouver, BC, on the SkyTrain; Detroit, MI, on the People Mover;
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 31, 2005
        on 31-Jul-05 18:17 J.H. Crawford said the following:

        >Hi All,
        >
        >Does anyone know more about "linear motor trains"?
        >
        >Regards,
        >
        >

        I couldn't describe all the details, but linear induction motors (LIMs)
        are in use in Vancouver, BC, on the SkyTrain; Detroit, MI, on the People
        Mover; Toronto, ON, on the SRT; and New York on the JFK AirTrain, among
        others (all built by Bombardier/predecessors).

        The article seemed to give the basic details on how they work. I'm no
        scientist, but the best explanation I've seen is that the LIM (which,
        IIRC, is on the track and not on the railcars themselves) is like a
        large electrical coil unrolled and laid flat between the two guiderails.

        It's actually a pretty good system, because it doesn't rely on traction
        of steel wheel on steel rail, so LIM-powered trains can climb steeper
        grades at higher speeds than traditional rail.

        --
        Robert Madison
        Milwaukee, WI

        http://community.webshots.com/user/rmadisonwi
        This message was composed using Mozilla Thunderbird 1.0.2


        "My Uncle Thumper had a problem with HIS probate, and he had to take these big pills, and drink lots of water."
      • tokyotuds
        ... AS MR CRAWFORD LINKED TO BELOW, THE OEDO Subway Line in Tokyo is apparently such a system. I live on this line and take it 2 or 3 times a week. My wife
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 1, 2005
          --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "J.H. Crawford" <mailbox@c...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Hi All,
          >
          > Does anyone know more about "linear motor trains"?
          >
          > Regards,
          >

          AS MR CRAWFORD LINKED TO BELOW, THE OEDO Subway Line in Tokyo is apparently such
          a system. I live on this line and take it 2 or 3 times a week. My wife uses it daily for
          commuting. I had no idea it had any other claim to fame except being a very deep
          subway.

          I do notice one problem with it. Being able to make the cars smaller (narrower too?), climb
          steeper slopes, (and turn sharper corners?) makes this line very, very noisy. The
          screeching is so loud at times you have to pause in your conversation. I had hoped this
          very new and modern line would be the quietest on the system.

          One blessedly quiet line is the Namboku Line which I (blessedly) use for commuting. It's
          very comfortable and quiet, but likely traditional technology. It's claim to fame is having
          every station platform enclosed next to the rails to prevent unfortunate accidents and
          suicides.

          So, my question is, can we have the advantages of a LIM line as per the article, and also
          have a relatively quiet ride?

          Mata,
          Tuds

          >
          > http://home.kyodo.co.jp/modules/fstStory/index.php?storyid=191954
          >
          > Linear motor trains introduced successively
          > TOKYO, July 14 KYODO
          > Linear motor trains, which do not float on rails, are
          increasingly introduced to
          subways in major cities because of their safety and lower
          construction costs, while floating
          ones, called magnetically levitated (maglev) trains, whose research
          began 40 years ago

          > Called ''Linear Metro,'' the train made its first debut in the
          Osaka municipal subway in
          1990, and has been introduced to Tokyo's Oedo subway and the
          municipal subways at
          Kobe and Fukuoka. Sendai and Yokohama are preparing to introduce the
          train.

          > ------ ### -----
          > J.H. Crawford Carfree Cities
          > mailbox@c... http://www.carfree.com
        • J.H. Crawford
          ... I m not sure LIM really has much to do with it. It does give lighter cars, as the propulsion is mostly stationary. What s needed is wheels that turn
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 1, 2005
            >So, my question is, can we have the advantages of a LIM line as per
            >the article, and also
            >have a relatively quiet ride?

            I'm not sure LIM really has much to do with it. It does
            give lighter cars, as the propulsion is mostly stationary.

            What's needed is wheels that turn independently, so that
            when going around curves one wheel does not have to slip.
            That's what makes the noise, mostly.

            Regards,


            ------ ### -----
            J.H. Crawford Carfree Cities
            mailbox@... http://www.carfree.com
          • tokyotuds
            Ahhh, I see... independent wheels. I sure wish they had used independent wheels on the Oedo Line. But certainly they got a lot right. It s the Oedo Line I
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 1, 2005
              Ahhh, I see... independent wheels. I sure wish they had used independent wheels on the
              Oedo Line. But certainly they got a lot right. It's the Oedo Line I used recently as a
              specific example of a loop line that has clear signage so passengers know which train to
              hop on.

              Cheers,
              Tuds


              --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "J.H. Crawford" <mailbox@c...> wrote:
              >
              > >So, my question is, can we have the advantages of a LIM line as per
              > >the article, and also
              > >have a relatively quiet ride?
              >
              > I'm not sure LIM really has much to do with it. It does
              > give lighter cars, as the propulsion is mostly stationary.
              >
              > What's needed is wheels that turn independently, so that
              > when going around curves one wheel does not have to slip.
              > That's what makes the noise, mostly.
              >
              > Regards,
              >
              >
              > ------ ### -----
              > J.H. Crawford Carfree Cities
              > mailbox@c... http://www.carfree.com
            • Tony Godshall
              According to Robert Madison, ... Cars may be cheaper but track is more expensive (the motor is built into the track, not the car). I d think they d be easier
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 1, 2005
                According to Robert Madison,
                > on 31-Jul-05 18:17 J.H. Crawford said the following:
                >
                > >Hi All,
                > >
                > >Does anyone know more about "linear motor trains"?
                > >
                > >Regards,
                > >
                > >
                >
                > I couldn't describe all the details, but linear induction motors (LIMs)
                > are in use in Vancouver, BC, on the SkyTrain; Detroit, MI, on the People
                > Mover; Toronto, ON, on the SRT; and New York on the JFK AirTrain, among
                > others (all built by Bombardier/predecessors).
                >
                > The article seemed to give the basic details on how they work. I'm no
                > scientist, but the best explanation I've seen is that the LIM (which,
                > IIRC, is on the track and not on the railcars themselves) is like a
                > large electrical coil unrolled and laid flat between the two guiderails.
                >
                > It's actually a pretty good system, because it doesn't rely on traction
                > of steel wheel on steel rail, so LIM-powered trains can climb steeper
                > grades at higher speeds than traditional rail.

                Cars may be cheaper but track is more expensive (the motor
                is built into the track, not the car). I'd think they'd be
                easier to justify for high-density areas.

                LIMs do exist, as noted above on various short heavy-use
                routes, esp. airports (as noted above) and rollercoasters.

                Maglevs are generally LIM-powered but LIMS are not
                necessarily maglevs.
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