Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [carfree_cities] Elevators

Expand Messages
  • Dan Korn
    ... I agree with the sentiment, but this comparison is flawed. First, I would remind you of the growing segment of the population that is unable to climb
    Message 1 of 86 , Jul 3, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      On Jul 3, 2005, at 6:36 AM, Debra Efroymson wrote:
      > Cars, elevators--same story, isn't it? We are killing
      > ourselves (lack of exercise) and our environment by
      > mechanizing everything, when what we--and our
      > environment--need is for us to expend more personal
      > energy and less carbon-based energy.
      > Anima (from elevator-lite Dhaka)

      I agree with the sentiment, but this comparison is flawed. First, I
      would remind you of the growing segment of the population that is
      unable to climb stairs. I'm not sure what disabled people do in Dhaka,
      but here in the U.S., the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was a
      huge victory for people living in a world largely unaccessible to them
      because of physical barriers like steps. Surely we wouldn't classify
      these people as "lazy" because they use elevators. But I suppose it is
      easy to forget about them.

      Also, an elevator can be a very handy thing to someone who uses
      alternative transportation. For instance, cycling becomes much more
      attractive if you don't have to lug your bike up three flights of
      stairs every time you get home. And multi-modal trips, such as taking
      your bike on the train, are facilitated by elevators in stations as
      well. And yes, there are people who are able to ride a bike but not
      able to carry it up stairs.

      I suppose some of the same arguments about providing access to the
      disabled could also be used to justify automobile usage. But I don't
      see this as a problem. There are always going to be some people who
      are going to need cars. Many of you may know about a woman named
      Shryley on the Car-Free list who has a severely disabled child.
      Despite incredible efforts to find a way to take her child to numerous
      doctors' offices by bike or transit, she reluctantly resorts to using a
      car. The fact that she feels guilty about it is admirable, but not
      very helpful. I don't bring this up to say that our cause in promoting
      car-free cities is unworthy, rather to remind us that we should not get
      so caught up in it that we lose sight of an equally worthy goal, which
      is to provide equitable access to all people.

      Also, as others have brought up, elevators use very little energy
      compared to automobiles. If the goal is to promote energy saving,
      you'll get a lot more mileage by reducing car usage even a little bit,
      or even by promoting low-energy fluorescent light-bulbs, than by
      getting rid of elevators.

      Dan
      Chicago
    • J.H. Crawford
      ... Well, no, TWO flats per floor, so they have through ventilation and some light from both ends. ... oh, yes Regards, ... J.H. Crawford
      Message 86 of 86 , Jul 14, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Winding up the elevator discussion, Will Stewart said:

        >I assume you are talking about flats as the context for the following,
        > where an elevator would service 3 floors above the ground floor, and
        >perhaps 4 units per floor at each elevator stop.

        Well, no, TWO flats per floor, so they have through ventilation
        and some light from both ends.

        >Plus, the human factor of modest scale and a courtyard are also very
        >important factors.

        oh, yes

        Regards,


        ------ ### -----
        J.H. Crawford Carfree Cities
        mailbox@... http://www.carfree.com
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.