Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Edinburgh peak oil meeting PDF

Expand Messages
  • Christopher Miller
    An interesting summary of proceedings of a colloquium on Peak Oil in the UK held 25 April in Edinburgh, worth a read:
    Message 1 of 1 , May 3, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      An interesting summary of proceedings of a colloquium on Peak Oil in
      the UK held 25 April in Edinburgh, worth a read:

      http://www.clv101.plus.com/docs/Peak_Oil_UK_Edinburgh_April05.pdf

      One speaker concentrated on transport:

      ����������������������������������������������
      Peak Oil UK
      Entering the Age of Oil Depletion
      25 April 2005
      Edinburgh, Scotland
      Page 4/8
      Transportation � An Oil Crisis and More
      David Spaven

      In contrast to previous speakers Spaven is not an oil man but a
      transport man. He believes transport is key in the Peak Oil debate.

      �in the UK 67% of oil consumed is for transport and 98% of transport
      fuel is oil.� �two fastest growing modes of transport � car and air
      travel � the car is almost totally oil dependent and there is no
      foreseeable alternative fuel source for aviation�.

      Worryingly, indications are that we are heading at full speed to a
      transport crunch. Climate change is in the public debate but is having
      little impact, Spaven explained how the Scottish Executive are moving
      ahead with a �1bn road building plan and a similarly expensive rail
      plan building new links
      to... Edinburgh and Glasgow airports! Oil depletion hasn�t even
      entered the public debate.

      Spaven�s programme for decoupling transport from oil involves
      technology development �
      doubling the fuel efficiency of cars. Mode shift of passengers and
      freight to less energy
      intensive forms of travel, walking and cycling since 50% of car
      journeys are under 5 miles
      and 25% under 2 miles. And reduced demand for transport through
      local production of
      goods, less demand for goods and less centralisation of facilities
      like health, education, work
      and shopping.
      ����������������������������������������������

      Christopher Miller
      Washington DC/Mount Rainier, Maryland
      USA



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.