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Re: McLanes vs. Train Lanes

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  • Greg Steele
    ... It is possible for a train to corner fast, see: http://www.sixflags.com/parks/greatadventure/Rides/nitro.html A coaster is designed to give thrills, a
    Message 1 of 24 , Mar 1, 2005
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      --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "emccaughrin"
      <emccaughrin@y...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "J.H. Crawford"
      > <mailbox@c...> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > The first PCC car was non-standard, too. Once they had built
      > > thousands of them, it WAS the standard.
      >
      > Because the design didn't require changes to existing
      > infrastructure. Nobody would have used it if it required making
      > changes to rail guage.
      >
      > >
      > > Now, once they take another 40 or 50 tons off, they'll only be
      > > twice as heavy as an airliner carrying the same number of
      > > people. ;-)
      >
      > And more than twice as comfortable.
      >
      >
      > > >
      > > >And on what basis do you claim European and Japanese trainsets
      > > >are unreliable?
      > >
      > > Constant equipment failures on Duct Railways, and especially on
      > > the new trams from Siemens and some older onces from Holec.
      >
      > So the next time a transit agency needs to purchase rolling stock,
      > they'll know what to avoid. That's the nice thing about having a
      > large global competitive market.
      >
      >
      > > >
      > > >http://www.railjournal.com/2001-02/japan.html
      > >
      > > This is not fully balanced; there is still a large side force
      > > (i.e., derailing force) on the bogies.
      >
      > Well, once you figure out how to make a train go around curves
      > without undergoing centripetal acceleration, we'll nominate you for
      > the Nobel Prize.

      It is possible for a "train" to corner fast, see:

      http://www.sixflags.com/parks/greatadventure/Rides/nitro.html

      A coaster is designed to give thrills, a commuter train should
      provide a smooth ride. My guess is that the knowledge about how to
      control G-force that goes into trill-rides could also be used to
      create speed at manual G's. If you go back to the drawing board some
      of the ideas here could be incorporated. It also means not only a
      new gauge but, a new concept in laying track.
    • Simon Baddeley
      This exchange which I suspect is very significant also seems very esoteric. Could someone share the larger picture - explaining why these details are
      Message 2 of 24 , Mar 1, 2005
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        This exchange which I suspect is very significant also seems very esoteric.
        Could someone share the larger picture - explaining why these details are
        important. For me a train tends to be train, whereas given that carfree
        cities are highly dependent on rail for intra and intercity transit I guess
        I should be much more rail literate than I feel lurking on this conversation
        which is filling up with acronyms by the hour (:))

        Simon B


        On 1/3/05 1:46 pm, "Greg Steele" <thegisguru@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "emccaughrin"
        > <emccaughrin@y...> wrote:
        >>
        >> --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "J.H. Crawford"
        >> <mailbox@c...> wrote:
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> The first PCC car was non-standard, too. Once they had built
        >>> thousands of them, it WAS the standard.
        >>
        >> Because the design didn't require changes to existing
        >> infrastructure. Nobody would have used it if it required making
        >> changes to rail guage.
        >>
        >>>
        >>> Now, once they take another 40 or 50 tons off, they'll only be
        >>> twice as heavy as an airliner carrying the same number of
        >>> people. ;-)
        >>
        >> And more than twice as comfortable.
        >>
        >>
        >>>>
        >>>> And on what basis do you claim European and Japanese trainsets
        >>>> are unreliable?
        >>>
        >>> Constant equipment failures on Duct Railways, and especially on
        >>> the new trams from Siemens and some older onces from Holec.
        >>
        >> So the next time a transit agency needs to purchase rolling stock,
        >> they'll know what to avoid. That's the nice thing about having a
        >> large global competitive market.
        >>
        >>
        >>>>
        >>>> http://www.railjournal.com/2001-02/japan.html
        >>>
        >>> This is not fully balanced; there is still a large side force
        >>> (i.e., derailing force) on the bogies.
        >>
        >> Well, once you figure out how to make a train go around curves
        >> without undergoing centripetal acceleration, we'll nominate you for
        >> the Nobel Prize.
        >
        > It is possible for a "train" to corner fast, see:
        >
        > http://www.sixflags.com/parks/greatadventure/Rides/nitro.html
        >
        > A coaster is designed to give thrills, a
      • CEB
        Hi, I think that an esoteric discussion is fine and useful on this list BUT that jargon and acronyms should be avoided and references listed as a matter of
        Message 3 of 24 , Mar 1, 2005
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          Hi,

          I think that an esoteric discussion is fine and useful on this list BUT that jargon and acronyms should be avoided and references listed as a matter of course.

          Todd
          ______________________________________________________________
          > Od: Simon Baddeley <s.j.baddeley@...>
          > Komu: "carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com" <carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com>
          > Datum: Tue, 01 Mar 2005 13:54:26 +0000
          > Předmět: Re: [carfree_cities] Re: McLanes vs. Train Lanes
          >
          >
          >
          > This exchange which I suspect is very significant also seems very esoteric.
          > Could someone share the larger picture - explaining why these details are
          > important. For me a train tends to be train, whereas given that carfree
          > cities are highly dependent on rail for intra and intercity transit I guess
          > I should be much more rail literate than I feel lurking on this conversation
          > which is filling up with acronyms by the hour (:))
          >
          > Simon B
          >
          >
          > On 1/3/05 1:46 pm, "Greg Steele" <thegisguru@...> wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "emccaughrin"
          > > <emccaughrin@y...> wrote:
          > >>
          > >> --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "J.H. Crawford"
          > >> <mailbox@c...> wrote:
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>> The first PCC car was non-standard, too. Once they had built
          > >>> thousands of them, it WAS the standard.
          > >>
          > >> Because the design didn't require changes to existing
          > >> infrastructure. Nobody would have used it if it required making
          > >> changes to rail guage.
          > >>
          > >>>
          > >>> Now, once they take another 40 or 50 tons off, they'll only be
          > >>> twice as heavy as an airliner carrying the same number of
          > >>> people. ;-)
          > >>
          > >> And more than twice as comfortable.
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>>>
          > >>>> And on what basis do you claim European and Japanese trainsets
          > >>>> are unreliable?
          > >>>
          > >>> Constant equipment failures on Duct Railways, and especially on
          > >>> the new trams from Siemens and some older onces from Holec.
          > >>
          > >> So the next time a transit agency needs to purchase rolling stock,
          > >> they'll know what to avoid. That's the nice thing about having a
          > >> large global competitive market.
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>>>
          > >>>> http://www.railjournal.com/2001-02/japan.html
          > >>>
          > >>> This is not fully balanced; there is still a large side force
          > >>> (i.e., derailing force) on the bogies.
          > >>
          > >> Well, once you figure out how to make a train go around curves
          > >> without undergoing centripetal acceleration, we'll nominate you for
          > >> the Nobel Prize.
          > >
          > > It is possible for a "train" to corner fast, see:
          > >
          > > http://www.sixflags.com/parks/greatadventure/Rides/nitro.html
          > >
          > > A coaster is designed to give thrills, a
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
          > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
          > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
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          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • J.H. Crawford
          Re: Interstate Rail ... I think this discussion really belongs somewhere else, and on somebody s time besides mine. I think the idea has enough merit to be
          Message 4 of 24 , Mar 1, 2005
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            Re: Interstate Rail

            Simon says:

            >This exchange which I suspect is very significant also seems very esoteric.
            >Could someone share the larger picture - explaining why these details are
            >important. For me a train tends to be train, whereas given that carfree
            >cities are highly dependent on rail for intra and intercity transit I guess
            >I should be much more rail literate than I feel lurking on this conversation
            >which is filling up with acronyms by the hour (:))

            I think this discussion really belongs somewhere else, and
            on somebody's time besides mine.

            I think the idea has enough merit to be worth a million-dollar
            preliminary feasibility study by Gibbs & Hill--anybody wnat to
            do the fundraising? Or know somebody at G&H who cuold be
            convinced that it's in their own best interests to look into
            this pro-bono?

            Otherwise, I'd like to drop this discussion.

            Regards,



            -- ### --

            J.H. Crawford Carfree Cities
            mailbox@... http://www.carfree.com
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