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Re: [carfree_cities] Is Wal-Mart Good for America?

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  • Robert J. Matter
    ... I watched this tonight. It was pretty good, but as expected completely overlooked the energy consumption and negative externalities of the WAL*MART
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 16, 2004
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      Robert J. Matter wrote:

      > http://wttw.com/schedules/nov/111604.htm
      >
      > WTTW11
      >
      > Tuesday November 16, 2004
      >
      > 9 pm
      > Frontline "Is Wal-Mart Good for America?"
      > FRONTLINE offers two starkly contrasting images: one of empty
      > storefronts in Circleville, Ohio, where the local TV manufacturing plant
      > has closed down; the other a sea of high rises in the South China
      > boomtown of Shenzhen. The connection between American job losses and
      > soaring Chinese exports Wal-Mart. For Wal-Mart, China has become the
      > cheapest, most reliable production platform in the world, the source of
      > up to $25 billion in annual imports that help the company deliver
      > everyday low prices to 100 million customers a week. But while some
      > economists credit Wal-Mart's single-minded focus on low costs with
      > helping contain U.S. inflation, others charge that the company is the
      > main force driving the massive overseas shift to China in the production
      > of American consumer goods, resulting in hundreds of thousands of lost
      > jobs and a lower standard of living here at home.
      > R 11/19 3:30am


      I watched this tonight. It was pretty good, but as expected completely
      overlooked the energy consumption and negative externalities of the
      WAL*MART business model (transport raw materials to distant sweatshops,
      transport the finished goods to stores in the U.S., and locate those
      stores on the fringe of towns on cheap virgin farmland). In all fairness
      to WAL*MART, they are starting to locate some stores in inner city
      neighborhoods after the surrounding rural and suburban areas are
      saturated with stores.

      -Bob Matter
      -----------
      "The edge of the city - indeed much of the land along its main traffic
      arteries, too - contained the usual horrific clusterfuck of chain
      stores, franchise fry-pits, muffler shops, parking lagoons, and the rest
      of the typical nauseating furnishings of drive-in commerce found in
      every American town, big and small. The trouble with Missoula was not a
      lack of open space. The problem was that everything it contained was
      poorly made, not worth caring about, and unworthy of the condition of
      collective self- respect called civilization." --James Howard Kunstler
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