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Florida Hurricanes & Carfree Cities

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  • Lanyon, Ryan
    As I hear about a third hurricane heading toward Florida, I wonder if any carfree connections will be made out of this year s hurricane season. Is the
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 9, 2004
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      As I hear about a third hurricane heading toward Florida, I wonder if any
      carfree connections will be made out of this year's hurricane season. Is
      the severity of the season due to global climate change, caused in large
      part from auto emissions? Or will the media and politicians chalk it up to
      a fluke year?

      I suspect the ground in Florida must be saturated already. I wonder if all
      those impermeable surfaces (known as parking lots and roofs) are causing
      flooding? If flooding from the next hurricane is severe enough (hopefully
      it won't happen), or if there's a lot of damage would it be possible that an
      inquiry might be launched to see how Floridians can minimize damage? Would
      solutions such as green roofs, reduced surface parking, etc be considered?
      Surely the insurance industry is going to be very interested in many
      solutions after this fall.

      What about evacuations? I saw images of clogged highways for Frances'
      evacuation. Would mass evacuation even be possible without cars? Or would
      people just have to settle with leaving more at home, including pets, as
      they boarded trains and buses?

      -RL

      In Ottawa, where the remnants of Hurricane Frances are currently flooding
      roads and causing rush-hour traffic jams (err... the motorists are causing
      them; the rain's just assisting).
    • Matt Hohmeister
      Living in Tallahassee, I can explain this. Frances came straight through here, but it had gotten so weak by then that it just gave us a few inches of rain and
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 9, 2004
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        Living in Tallahassee, I can explain this. Frances came straight through here, but it had
        gotten so weak by then that it just gave us a few inches of rain and winds up to 40 mph.

        Not being a scientist, I can't explain air pollution and its link to weather like hurricanes.
        However, I can explain the whole flooding thing: what do you expect when basically every
        inhabitable square foot has it associated equivalent in parking lots--and more? That's
        right--a landlord forced to provide 5 parking spaces for a 4-bedroom, 1600 square foot
        apartment is actually dedicating more space to parking than to living! The worst part, of
        course, is that while living can be easily stacked thanks to stairs and elevators, parking is
        very difficult and expensive to stack. This explains the 3-story apartment buildings with
        parking going on forever.

        Another way to reduce hurricane damage is to stop building new houses and apartments
        out of toothpicks--a practice very common in Florida, even since Andrew in 1992. My
        apartment was built in 1968 with cinder block walls and concrete-slab floors/ceilings, and
        could probably survive anything Mother Nature can dish out. This is a rant for a different
        arena, along with federal flood insurance (mentioned in an old political rant of Joel's at
        http://www.jhcrawford.com/hot/1997-07-28_x.htm

        --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "Lanyon, Ryan" <ryan.lanyon@o...> wrote:
        > As I hear about a third hurricane heading toward Florida, I wonder if any
        > carfree connections will be made out of this year's hurricane season. Is
        > the severity of the season due to global climate change, caused in large
        > part from auto emissions? Or will the media and politicians chalk it up to
        > a fluke year?
        >
        > I suspect the ground in Florida must be saturated already. I wonder if all
        > those impermeable surfaces (known as parking lots and roofs) are causing
        > flooding? If flooding from the next hurricane is severe enough (hopefully
        > it won't happen), or if there's a lot of damage would it be possible that an
        > inquiry might be launched to see how Floridians can minimize damage? Would
        > solutions such as green roofs, reduced surface parking, etc be considered?
        > Surely the insurance industry is going to be very interested in many
        > solutions after this fall.
        >
        > What about evacuations? I saw images of clogged highways for Frances'
        > evacuation. Would mass evacuation even be possible without cars? Or would
        > people just have to settle with leaving more at home, including pets, as
        > they boarded trains and buses?
        >
        > -RL
        >
        > In Ottawa, where the remnants of Hurricane Frances are currently flooding
        > roads and causing rush-hour traffic jams (err... the motorists are causing
        > them; the rain's just assisting).
      • Karen Sandness
        And on the other side of the world, East Asia has been having a record typhoon season, with *17* so far. In transit, Karen Sandness
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 10, 2004
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          And on the other side of the world, East Asia has been having a record
          typhoon season, with *17* so far.

          In transit,
          Karen Sandness

          On Sep 10, 2004, at 7:53 AM, carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com wrote:

          > As I hear about a third hurricane heading toward Florida, I wonder if
          > any
          > carfree connections will be made out of this year's hurricane season.
          > Is
          > the severity of the season due to global climate change, caused in
          > large
          > part from auto emissions? Or will the media and politicians chalk it
          > up to
          > a fluke year?
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