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Jakarta Car Free Day 2004

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  • Damantoro
    Dear All JAkarta will hold Car free Day 2004 this 26 September. Please share your information if you have relative or colleage that did the same program in
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 4, 2004
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      Dear All
      JAkarta will hold Car free Day 2004 this 26 September.
      Please share your information if you have relative or colleage that did the
      same program in their cities as committee or oficial.
      Thanks

      Damantoro
      Program Transport PELANGI
      Jl. Pangeran Antasari No. 10 Kebayoran Baru
      Jakarta Selatan 12150, Indonesia
      Ph (62-21) 7280 1172 (hunting), Fax (62-21) 7280 1174
      www.pelangi.or.id <http://www.pelangi.or.id>


      -----Original Message-----
      From: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com]
      Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2004 3:41 PM
      To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [carfree_cities] Digest Number 1370


      There are 8 messages in this issue.

      Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: best Cities to Go Carfree
      From: Karen Sandness <ksandness@...>
      2. Re: Re: best Cities to Go Carfree
      From: "CEB" <cyklopraha@...>
      3. Re: Re: best Cities to Go Carfree
      From: Patrick J McDonough <patrick1@...>
      4. The Politics of Defining the Debate
      From: "Lanyon, Ryan" <ryan.lanyon@...>
      5. Re: The Politics of Defining the Debate
      From: Simon Baddeley <s.j.baddeley@...>
      6. Re: Atlanta and other Cities
      From: Randall Hunt <randhunt@...>
      7. Jerome,AZ
      From: Suzanne Wooten <hazyzane68@...>
      8. Furious row over global warming in Moscow
      From: Simon Baddeley <s.j.baddeley@...>


      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 1
      Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 09:19:47 -0500
      From: Karen Sandness <ksandness@...>
      Subject: Re: best Cities to Go Carfree

      I was car-free for the ten years that I lived in Portland, Oregon.
      Tri-Met, the local transit authority, is unusual for an American
      transit authority in that it aims to make car-freedom a possibility,
      rather than just facilitating job commutes Monday through Friday.

      The light rail system just opened a new line last spring, and the bus
      system is constantly being improved, with Tri-Met committed to
      eventually running buses every 15 minutes, seven days a week, on all
      the arterial streets. Even the suburbs are well served. There is also
      an extremely active Bicycle Transportation Alliance, and the city
      government has citizen advisory committees for both pedestrians and
      cyclists. I was on the Pedestrian Advisory Committee, and we got to
      have input on all major new construction and infrastructure proposals.

      I left Portland because everything EXCEPT the transit system started
      turning sour for me, but simply from the point of view of accessibility
      without a car, Portland is hard to beat if you want a mid-sized city
      with a mild climate.

      If you want something smaller, Eugene is exceptionally
      bicycle-friendly, as is Corvallis.

      I have to be car lite here in Minneapolis (fortunately, I was able to
      take over my mother's 1991 car), because my relatives all live in the
      burbs, and the transit system is so focused on getting commuters
      downtown that connections among lines do not work well, nor do the
      buses run very often. I'm happy here otherwise, but I'd never recommend
      moving here just to be car-free.

      In transit,
      Karen Sandness

      On Tuesday, Aug 3, 2004, at 03:50 US/Central,
      carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      > I`m a new member,you guys probably have already dealt with this
      > question but I was wondering what are the best cities to live without
      > a car?I live in the Michigan and looking to move to a city somewhere
      > that has good transportation and is affordable and warm.Any advice is
      > helpful...thanks!!!



      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 2
      Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 17:17:19 +0200
      From: "CEB" <cyklopraha@...>
      Subject: Re: Re: best Cities to Go Carfree

      Portland also has Czech trams!!! Actually SF has Czech buses, but company
      that made them just went bust....

      Todd in Prague,
      Member, Steering Commitee, WCN

      ______________________________________________________________
      > Od: Karen Sandness <ksandness@...>
      > Komu: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
      > CC:
      > Datum: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 09:19:47 -0500
      > Pøedmìt: [carfree_cities] Re: best Cities to Go Carfree
      >
      > I was car-free for the ten years that I lived in Portland, Oregon.
      > Tri-Met, the local transit authority, is unusual for an American
      > transit authority in that it aims to make car-freedom a possibility,
      > rather than just facilitating job commutes Monday through Friday.
      >
      > The light rail system just opened a new line last spring, and the bus
      > system is constantly being improved, with Tri-Met committed to
      > eventually running buses every 15 minutes, seven days a week, on all
      > the arterial streets. Even the suburbs are well served. There is also
      > an extremely active Bicycle Transportation Alliance, and the city
      > government has citizen advisory committees for both pedestrians and
      > cyclists. I was on the Pedestrian Advisory Committee, and we got to
      > have input on all major new construction and infrastructure proposals.
      >
      > I left Portland because everything EXCEPT the transit system started
      > turning sour for me, but simply from the point of view of accessibility
      > without a car, Portland is hard to beat if you want a mid-sized city
      > with a mild climate.
      >
      > If you want something smaller, Eugene is exceptionally
      > bicycle-friendly, as is Corvallis.
      >
      > I have to be car lite here in Minneapolis (fortunately, I was able to
      > take over my mother's 1991 car), because my relatives all live in the
      > burbs, and the transit system is so focused on getting commuters
      > downtown that connections among lines do not work well, nor do the
      > buses run very often. I'm happy here otherwise, but I'd never recommend
      > moving here just to be car-free.
      >
      > In transit,
      > Karen Sandness
      >
      > On Tuesday, Aug 3, 2004, at 03:50 US/Central,
      > carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com wrote:
      >
      > > I`m a new member,you guys probably have already dealt with this
      > > question but I was wondering what are the best cities to live without
      > > a car?I live in the Michigan and looking to move to a city somewhere
      > > that has good transportation and is affordable and warm.Any advice is
      > > helpful...thanks!!!
      >
      >
      >
      > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
      > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
      carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
      > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

      ---------------
      JSI VE FORMÌ? Bojuj online v originálních disciplínách na
      http://ateny2004.centrum.cz





      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 3
      Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 11:28:52 -0400 (EDT)
      From: Patrick J McDonough <patrick1@...>
      Subject: Re: Re: best Cities to Go Carfree

      Karen,

      Of the other things that went sour, which items had to do with the public
      realm? Crime? School quality? Bad governance? Were any of these public
      goods related to the overall quality of urban life headed in a declining
      direction?

      Clean streets, walkable neighborhoods where the elderly and children are
      safe, local schools, and well-managed public spaces are also important to
      support car-free living.

      Patrick McDonough

      On Tue, 3 Aug 2004, Karen Sandness wrote:
      > I left Portland because everything EXCEPT the transit system started
      > turning sour for me, but simply from the point of view of accessibility
      > without a car, Portland is hard to beat if you want a mid-sized city
      > with a mild climate.



      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 4
      Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 13:01:33 -0400
      From: "Lanyon, Ryan" <ryan.lanyon@...>
      Subject: The Politics of Defining the Debate

      It never ceases to amaze me how progressive terminology gets adopted and
      redefined by others, particularly from the right, to redefine the debate.
      We in Ontario recently had a 'Smart Growth' project from our provincial
      government that included rural economic development and highway building
      (luckily that government got tossed).

      In the latest chapter, the auto industry is seeking to redefine 'sustainable
      transportation'. The report below is from Centerlines, the newsletter of
      the national center for bicycling and walking in the US.

      -RL

      CAR COMPANIES: BIKE/PED-FREE "SUSTAINABLE TRANS"

      -> Earlier this month, the World Business Council for Sustainable
      Development (WBCSD), led by 12 international car, oil and tire
      companies, released their vision of a global sustainable transportation
      future. In a WBCSD report, entitled 'Mobility 2030: Meeting the
      Challenges to Sustainability,' they define sustainable mobility as "the
      ability to meet the needs of society to move freely, gain access,
      communicate, trade and establish relationships without sacrificing
      other essential human or ecological values today or in the future."

      The authors find accessible, sustainable and affordable mobility to be
      compatible with auto-dependency. Sadly, bicycling and walking are not
      part of their vision as they see cities -- particularly those in the
      developing world -- continuing to grow in area and decline in density.
      They believe that new technology, principally road vehicles with
      automatic driving capabilities will create new transport systems. One
      quote notes "the car has radically reshaped cities because it
      eliminates walking almost entirely."

      A variety of materials, including the main report, may be found here:
      http://www.wbcsd.org/Plugins/DocSearch/details.asp?strDocTypeIdList=749&DocT
      ype=749&StrCharValList=&DateStart=01.01.1753&DateEnd=31.12.9999&MenuId=Mzcx&
      DocId=6097&URLBack=%2Ftemplates%2FTemplateWBCSD2%2Flayout%2Easp%3Ftype%3Dp%2
      6MenuId%3DMzcx%26doOpen%3D1%26ClickMenu%3DRightMenu




      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 5
      Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 20:24:09 +0100
      From: Simon Baddeley <s.j.baddeley@...>
      Subject: Re: The Politics of Defining the Debate

      Yes but. "Smart growth" was rather a successful colonisation by "our lot" of
      the language and style of the sprawlists. It's a feature of political
      movements to invade, purloin and otherwise recycle the language of the
      opposition and then be accused of lying distortion to the delight of the
      thieves who by such reaction know they've made a hit. In a snowball fight
      don't you pick up those spent by the other side and throw them back?
      Compressed? Enlarged? More rounded? Sometimes (not me this!) with hard
      object inserted?

      To stay in a debate we constantly rewrite the truths we perceive as
      self-evident - because they never really are. "Greenwash" was quite a good
      word and on the other side "eco-terrorists" for people who campaign
      non-violently action against polluters, not to mention "tree-huggers". Of
      course the most successfully damaged word in the American political scene is
      "liberal". I have a liking for the word "speedophile" for hypermobility
      addicts but "auto-dependency" is a good one isn't it, along with petrol
      heads"? As well as the words there's the constant invention of ideas - lie
      "motorists use up their extra-safety on speed" which is spawned by the still
      contested concept of "risk compensation".

      We are working hard in UK to downgrade the universal use of the word
      "accident" when people are killed and maimed by motorised traffic, as
      though' these crashes and collisions and their consequences were not the
      result of human choice, irresponsibility and sometimes outright criminal
      negligence.

      So if you think your being appropriated, remember its only your own good
      methods being played back. ".. words are wise men¹s counters,‹they do but
      reckon by them; but they are the money of fools." Thomas Hobbes

      Best

      Simon



      On 3/8/04 6:01 pm, "Lanyon, Ryan" <ryan.lanyon@...> wrote:

      > It never ceases to amaze me how progressive terminology gets adopted and
      > redefined by others, particularly from the right, to redefine the debate.
      > We in Ontario recently had a 'Smart Growth' project from our provincial
      > government that included rural economic development and highway building
      > (luckily that government got tossed).
      >
      > In the latest chapter, the auto industry is seeking to redefine
      'sustainable
      > transportation'. The report below is from Centerlines, the newsletter of
      > the national center for bicycling and walking in the US.




      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 6
      Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 12:38:43 -0700
      From: Randall Hunt <randhunt@...>
      Subject: Re: Atlanta and other Cities

      >Message: 11
      > Date: Mon, 2 Aug 2004 18:54:06 -0700 (PDT)
      > From: Suzanne Wooten <hazyzane68@...>
      >Subject: Atlanta and other Cities
      >
      >Thank you for your carfree city ideas I`ll keep all of them in mind.
      >What about Arizona ,does anyone live in Arizona without a car?

      I have the very great pleasure of living as a pedestrian in Jerome, AZ, a
      former copper mining town built on the side of a mountain. The town sits
      about 2000 feet above the Verde Valley. The view across the valley includes
      the red rocks of Sedona, Sycamore Canyon wilderness area, Tuzigoot indian
      ruin, the Verde River and Tavasci Marsh (known worldwide as a birding
      mecca), and the towns of Cottonwood and Clarkdale below. (Cottonwood has
      light pollution ordinances, tho they don't seem to be very well enforced)
      The San Francisco Peaks in Flagstaff, sacred to the indigenous peoples, are
      clearly in view about fifty miles away. Arcosanti is about 40 minutes away.
      Check out the view at
      http://www.wildapache.net/randhunt/art/ironwork.htm#Stair (scroll to third
      photo).

      The town was founded 1899. In 1930, Jerome had a population of 15,000 and
      was the third largest city in the state. The 2000 census put the town at
      329, including many artists, writers, musicians and bikers. The entire town
      is an official historical site, and is more or less preserved
      architecturally.

      About 3 years ago, we got a general store. There is no bank or gas station
      but you can coast the 4 miles out of town to a pump -- just make sure your
      brakes are working! Since Jerome sits on the side of a mountain, walking
      becomes aerobic exercise. It takes me 25 minutes to walk from Cleopatra
      Hill to the old town dump. It takes me 5 minutes to walk to work.

      We get a few inches of snow a few times a year. Today, I'm hoping the
      thunderheads will pile up and keep this monsoon season active. It's about
      90 degrees F. Water scarcity is a major issue here, as it is all over
      Arizona.

      Since you (all) are on this list, I wouldn't mind having you as a
      neighbor...but please don't tell anyone else about Jerome!

      Randall Hunt





      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 7
      Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 13:00:10 -0700 (PDT)
      From: Suzanne Wooten <hazyzane68@...>
      Subject: Jerome,AZ

      Thanks Randall for your reply,I know about Jerome and I`m quite interested
      it as a possible escape from MI.I like the whole idea of living amongst
      artists.i like quirky little towns.Wow,you guys have been very helpful to
      me.I`m so glad you guys care about the environment and don`t "worship"
      cars.I guess since Detroit,MI is called the "motor city"
      People can`t even imagine giving up their precious SUVs.I`m glad there are
      so many options out there.
      I`ve also considered a move to Europe because is so very easy to get
      around without a car.i`ll just try to find a country that doesn`t hate
      Americans too much.I lived in England
      for a while in the 80`s and loved it.

      Suzanne


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      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 8
      Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 09:34:34 +0100
      From: Simon Baddeley <s.j.baddeley@...>
      Subject: Furious row over global warming in Moscow

      Here is a dispassionate account of one hell of a row that happened at a
      conference in Russia last month:

      http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Artic
      le_Type1&c=Article&cid=1090534211634&call_pageid=968332188774&col=9683501164
      67

      These rows are occurring among the highly educated. We know Sir David King,
      UK chief scientific adviser to HM government. said recently that "Global
      warming is worse than terrorism" (Science Journal 9 Jan 2004 - for a PDF
      file of the full article see:
      http://www.britischebotschaft.de/en/news/items/040109a.htm )

      Below are references to stories from the right and from the Russian media
      perspective as Sir David and colleagues sought to emphasise the above
      assertion at the meeting in July:

      "...Yet another example of arrogant America disrupting the world's attempts
      to solve the climate change program? No. The delegation in question was that
      of the United Kingdom, and the conference was that held last week (15th July
      approx) in Moscow, hosted by the Russian Academy of Sciences.

      http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/murray200407230903.asp

      http://www.themoscowtimes.com/stories/2004/07/12/041.html

      http://www.techcentralstation.com/071904F.html

      I'd be interested in reactions to this. Is this an example of global-warming
      getting out of net debate among campaigners and off the streets and out of
      the pamphlets and truly into the realm of hi-politics where men in suits
      start shouting at each other? I doubt Sir David and his delegation would
      have behaved as they did without support at the highest level in the UK
      Government.

      Regards

      Simon


      Simon Baddeley Birmingham B20 3TG





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