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Re: best Cities to Go Carfree

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  • Karen Sandness
    I was car-free for the ten years that I lived in Portland, Oregon. Tri-Met, the local transit authority, is unusual for an American transit authority in that
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 3, 2004
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      I was car-free for the ten years that I lived in Portland, Oregon.
      Tri-Met, the local transit authority, is unusual for an American
      transit authority in that it aims to make car-freedom a possibility,
      rather than just facilitating job commutes Monday through Friday.

      The light rail system just opened a new line last spring, and the bus
      system is constantly being improved, with Tri-Met committed to
      eventually running buses every 15 minutes, seven days a week, on all
      the arterial streets. Even the suburbs are well served. There is also
      an extremely active Bicycle Transportation Alliance, and the city
      government has citizen advisory committees for both pedestrians and
      cyclists. I was on the Pedestrian Advisory Committee, and we got to
      have input on all major new construction and infrastructure proposals.

      I left Portland because everything EXCEPT the transit system started
      turning sour for me, but simply from the point of view of accessibility
      without a car, Portland is hard to beat if you want a mid-sized city
      with a mild climate.

      If you want something smaller, Eugene is exceptionally
      bicycle-friendly, as is Corvallis.

      I have to be car lite here in Minneapolis (fortunately, I was able to
      take over my mother's 1991 car), because my relatives all live in the
      burbs, and the transit system is so focused on getting commuters
      downtown that connections among lines do not work well, nor do the
      buses run very often. I'm happy here otherwise, but I'd never recommend
      moving here just to be car-free.

      In transit,
      Karen Sandness

      On Tuesday, Aug 3, 2004, at 03:50 US/Central,
      carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      > I`m a new member,you guys probably have already dealt with this
      > question but I was wondering what are the best cities to live without
      > a car?I live in the Michigan and looking to move to a city somewhere
      > that has good transportation and is affordable and warm.Any advice is
      > helpful...thanks!!!
    • CEB
      Portland also has Czech trams!!! Actually SF has Czech buses, but company that made them just went bust.... Todd in Prague, Member, Steering Commitee, WCN ...
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 3, 2004
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        Portland also has Czech trams!!! Actually SF has Czech buses, but company that made them just went bust....

        Todd in Prague,
        Member, Steering Commitee, WCN

        ______________________________________________________________
        > Od: Karen Sandness <ksandness@...>
        > Komu: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
        > CC:
        > Datum: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 09:19:47 -0500
        > Předmět: [carfree_cities] Re: best Cities to Go Carfree
        >
        > I was car-free for the ten years that I lived in Portland, Oregon.
        > Tri-Met, the local transit authority, is unusual for an American
        > transit authority in that it aims to make car-freedom a possibility,
        > rather than just facilitating job commutes Monday through Friday.
        >
        > The light rail system just opened a new line last spring, and the bus
        > system is constantly being improved, with Tri-Met committed to
        > eventually running buses every 15 minutes, seven days a week, on all
        > the arterial streets. Even the suburbs are well served. There is also
        > an extremely active Bicycle Transportation Alliance, and the city
        > government has citizen advisory committees for both pedestrians and
        > cyclists. I was on the Pedestrian Advisory Committee, and we got to
        > have input on all major new construction and infrastructure proposals.
        >
        > I left Portland because everything EXCEPT the transit system started
        > turning sour for me, but simply from the point of view of accessibility
        > without a car, Portland is hard to beat if you want a mid-sized city
        > with a mild climate.
        >
        > If you want something smaller, Eugene is exceptionally
        > bicycle-friendly, as is Corvallis.
        >
        > I have to be car lite here in Minneapolis (fortunately, I was able to
        > take over my mother's 1991 car), because my relatives all live in the
        > burbs, and the transit system is so focused on getting commuters
        > downtown that connections among lines do not work well, nor do the
        > buses run very often. I'm happy here otherwise, but I'd never recommend
        > moving here just to be car-free.
        >
        > In transit,
        > Karen Sandness
        >
        > On Tuesday, Aug 3, 2004, at 03:50 US/Central,
        > carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com wrote:
        >
        > > I`m a new member,you guys probably have already dealt with this
        > > question but I was wondering what are the best cities to live without
        > > a car?I live in the Michigan and looking to move to a city somewhere
        > > that has good transportation and is affordable and warm.Any advice is
        > > helpful...thanks!!!
        >
        >
        >
        > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
        > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
        > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >

        ---------------
        JSI VE FORMĚ? Bojuj online v originálních disciplínách na http://ateny2004.centrum.cz
      • Patrick J McDonough
        Karen, Of the other things that went sour, which items had to do with the public realm? Crime? School quality? Bad governance? Were any of these public
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 3, 2004
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          Karen,

          Of the other things that went sour, which items had to do with the public
          realm? Crime? School quality? Bad governance? Were any of these public
          goods related to the overall quality of urban life headed in a declining
          direction?

          Clean streets, walkable neighborhoods where the elderly and children are
          safe, local schools, and well-managed public spaces are also important to
          support car-free living.

          Patrick McDonough

          On Tue, 3 Aug 2004, Karen Sandness wrote:
          > I left Portland because everything EXCEPT the transit system started
          > turning sour for me, but simply from the point of view of accessibility
          > without a car, Portland is hard to beat if you want a mid-sized city
          > with a mild climate.
        • Karen Sandness
          The main reasons were personal. A lot of groups and institutions that I was associated with started to disintegrate or disappear within a two-year period, and
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 4, 2004
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            The main reasons were personal. A lot of groups and institutions that I
            was associated with started to disintegrate or disappear within a
            two-year period, and most of the people I had been close to either
            moved away, died, or changed drastically within that same time. The
            pig-headed antipathy to taxes and public services in the state of
            Oregon as a whole (outside of Portland and the college towns) was just
            another irritant.

            Even though I miss seeing mountains out my kitchen window, living
            through a winter without subzero temperatures, and living within five
            minutes' walk of a light rail station, moving back to my home city of
            Minneapolis has provided a lot of new beginnings. If anything, the
            urban environment is more deteriorated here, but I've found a pleasant,
            walkable neighborhood (the same one that Eric Utne of the The Utne
            Reader lives in) and made plenty of new and interesting connections.

            In transit,
            Karen Sandness

            On Wednesday, Aug 4, 2004, at 03:41 US/Central,
            carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com wrote:

            > Karen,
            >
            > Of the other things that went sour, which items had to do with the
            > public
            > realm? Crime? School quality? Bad governance? Were any of these
            > public
            > goods related to the overall quality of urban life headed in a
            > declining
            > direction?

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Patrick J McDonough
            Can someone point me to a good web resource that explains how european fuel taxes are spent? Which portion goes to road maintenance? Which to public
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 30, 2004
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              Can someone point me to a good web resource that explains how european
              fuel taxes are spent?

              Which portion goes to road maintenance? Which to public transport? Which
              portion to bike/ped? How much is diverted to non-transport related
              government programs?

              Individual ountry information is great, multi-country information is even
              better.

              Thanks,
              Patrick McDonough
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