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Re: [carfree_cities] Atlanta and other Cities

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  • Jeremy Hubble
    Phoenix can be a challenge. The heat and the sprawl put it on the low-end of the easy to go car free scale. However, areas like Tempe have a large student
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 2, 2004
      Phoenix can be a challenge. The heat and the sprawl put it on the
      low-end of the easy 'to go car free' scale. However, areas like Tempe
      have a large student population and can be fairly accessible on foot or
      bike. There are also some employment centers (I recall an America West
      HQ) close to campus. And when I was there a few years back the bus
      system accepted credit cards.

      Atlanta could be a very viable car-free location. It seems that every
      other Marta stop is in the middle of a mall or major shopping center.
      Probably one of the few places were you could lead a suburban big-box
      shopping life style without a car. Transit and housing are also fairly
      cheap. However, most residents are car addicts, and have this tendency
      to move further and further out and drive ridiculously long hours.

      Northern California is a great car-free location. Unfortunately, real
      estate costs there are insanely high. San Francisco and San Mateo
      counties are built up mostly on a narrow section of a peninsula. With
      CalTrain on one side, and BART on the most built up portion of the other
      side, it is very easy to navigate by train. Throw in a bike and you can
      really get anywhere there with ease. Down in to Silicon Valley,
      transit isn't as good, and pollution is worse, but it is still easy to
      get around by bike and foot. Even though most development is single
      family houses, the lots tend to be smaller, and neighborhoods reasonably
      built up. The East Bay also also amble car-free opportunities,
      especially in Oakland and Berkeley. The weather is comfortable year
      round, making it ideal for Biking.

      Salt Lake City has along narrow layout with a train similar to the San
      Francisco area. It's very easy to get around on foot, bike, or
      bus/train. However, most people seem to drive.

      Then you can always branch out to other countries and continents. If
      you really want warm try south america, India, Southeast Asia, Africa,
      etc.

      In reality, with few exceptions, you can comfortably live car free just
      about anywhere. With a bike you could get to locations that are outside
      walking distance (and carry larger loads.) Sometimes the most car
      friendly areas can be the bets places to go car free. They often seem
      to be trying hard to get people out of there cars, offering
      ever-improving and cheap transit, as well as enhancing bicycle and
      pedestrian facilities. If you have children then things start to get a
      little more tricky. Walking is definitely preferred making urban areas
      as the more ideal destination.

      Suzanne Wooten wrote:
      >
      > Thank you for your carfree city ideas I`ll keep all of them in mind.What about Arizona ,does anyone live in Arizona without a car?
      >
      >
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    • Randall Hunt
      ... I have the very great pleasure of living as a pedestrian in Jerome, AZ, a former copper mining town built on the side of a mountain. The town sits about
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 3, 2004
        >Message: 11
        > Date: Mon, 2 Aug 2004 18:54:06 -0700 (PDT)
        > From: Suzanne Wooten <hazyzane68@...>
        >Subject: Atlanta and other Cities
        >
        >Thank you for your carfree city ideas I`ll keep all of them in mind.
        >What about Arizona ,does anyone live in Arizona without a car?

        I have the very great pleasure of living as a pedestrian in Jerome, AZ, a
        former copper mining town built on the side of a mountain. The town sits
        about 2000 feet above the Verde Valley. The view across the valley includes
        the red rocks of Sedona, Sycamore Canyon wilderness area, Tuzigoot indian
        ruin, the Verde River and Tavasci Marsh (known worldwide as a birding
        mecca), and the towns of Cottonwood and Clarkdale below. (Cottonwood has
        light pollution ordinances, tho they don't seem to be very well enforced)
        The San Francisco Peaks in Flagstaff, sacred to the indigenous peoples, are
        clearly in view about fifty miles away. Arcosanti is about 40 minutes away.
        Check out the view at
        http://www.wildapache.net/randhunt/art/ironwork.htm#Stair (scroll to third
        photo).

        The town was founded 1899. In 1930, Jerome had a population of 15,000 and
        was the third largest city in the state. The 2000 census put the town at
        329, including many artists, writers, musicians and bikers. The entire town
        is an official historical site, and is more or less preserved
        architecturally.

        About 3 years ago, we got a general store. There is no bank or gas station
        but you can coast the 4 miles out of town to a pump -- just make sure your
        brakes are working! Since Jerome sits on the side of a mountain, walking
        becomes aerobic exercise. It takes me 25 minutes to walk from Cleopatra
        Hill to the old town dump. It takes me 5 minutes to walk to work.

        We get a few inches of snow a few times a year. Today, I'm hoping the
        thunderheads will pile up and keep this monsoon season active. It's about
        90 degrees F. Water scarcity is a major issue here, as it is all over
        Arizona.

        Since you (all) are on this list, I wouldn't mind having you as a
        neighbor...but please don't tell anyone else about Jerome!

        Randall Hunt
      • monoceroos
        ... mind.What about Arizona ,does anyone live in Arizona without a car? ... Sorry about the delayed reply ... I just noticed this thread today. I arrived in
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 15, 2004
          --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, Suzanne Wooten
          <hazyzane68@y...> wrote:
          > Thank you for your carfree city ideas I`ll keep all of them in
          mind.What about Arizona ,does anyone live in Arizona without a car?
          >
          Sorry about the delayed reply ... I just noticed this thread today.

          I arrived in Tucson at the end of very long cross-country bicycle
          trip in 1985. It seemed like a wonderful place to stay and commute
          by bicycle. I haven't been disappointed although the town has grown
          considerably since my arrival.

          For a while I had a car and a couple of motorcycles for
          transportation. But, almost three years ago I donated the car to
          charity and only ride one of the motorcycles (if I have a fairly
          distant destination) -- 99% of my travel is by bicycle which I find
          quite satisfying. Tucson does have a fairly good bus system, but I
          haven't used it in years as I live out in the county and the nearest
          bus stop is 5 miles away. Be warned, the Tucson urban area is
          really spread out.

          It's a relatively low wage town but, then, the cost of living is
          also fairly low -- it works out. BTW, I lived in Phoenix for a
          couple of years (for employment reasons) and consider it the anti-
          Tucson. I'll never go back there to live -- no offense meant to
          those who reside there.
        • J B
          whats the tempeture in arizona? monoceroos wrote:--- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, Suzanne Wooten ... mind.What about Arizona ,does
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 16, 2004
            whats the tempeture in arizona?

            monoceroos <monoceroos@...> wrote:--- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, Suzanne Wooten
            wrote:
            > Thank you for your carfree city ideas I`ll keep all of them in
            mind.What about Arizona ,does anyone live in Arizona without a car?
            >
            Sorry about the delayed reply ... I just noticed this thread today.

            I arrived in Tucson at the end of very long cross-country bicycle
            trip in 1985. It seemed like a wonderful place to stay and commute
            by bicycle. I haven't been disappointed although the town has grown
            considerably since my arrival.

            For a while I had a car and a couple of motorcycles for
            transportation. But, almost three years ago I donated the car to
            charity and only ride one of the motorcycles (if I have a fairly
            distant destination) -- 99% of my travel is by bicycle which I find
            quite satisfying. Tucson does have a fairly good bus system, but I
            haven't used it in years as I live out in the county and the nearest
            bus stop is 5 miles away. Be warned, the Tucson urban area is
            really spread out.

            It's a relatively low wage town but, then, the cost of living is
            also fairly low -- it works out. BTW, I lived in Phoenix for a
            couple of years (for employment reasons) and consider it the anti-
            Tucson. I'll never go back there to live -- no offense meant to
            those who reside there.




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          • Mike Morin
            Between electricity and water usage, I think Tucson, like others, should reassess the way they live and do business Working for peace and cooperation, Mike
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 16, 2004
              Between electricity and water usage, I think Tucson, like others, should
              reassess the way they live and do business


              Working for peace and cooperation,

              Mike Morin

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "J B" <jab44helix@...>
              To: <carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, August 16, 2004 5:45 PM
              Subject: Re: [carfree_cities] Re: Atlanta and other Cities


              > whats the tempeture in arizona?
              >
              > monoceroos <monoceroos@...> wrote:--- In
              carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, Suzanne Wooten
              > wrote:
              > > Thank you for your carfree city ideas I`ll keep all of them in
              > mind.What about Arizona ,does anyone live in Arizona without a car?
              > >
              > Sorry about the delayed reply ... I just noticed this thread today.
              >
              > I arrived in Tucson at the end of very long cross-country bicycle
              > trip in 1985. It seemed like a wonderful place to stay and commute
              > by bicycle. I haven't been disappointed although the town has grown
              > considerably since my arrival.
              >
              > For a while I had a car and a couple of motorcycles for
              > transportation. But, almost three years ago I donated the car to
              > charity and only ride one of the motorcycles (if I have a fairly
              > distant destination) -- 99% of my travel is by bicycle which I find
              > quite satisfying. Tucson does have a fairly good bus system, but I
              > haven't used it in years as I live out in the county and the nearest
              > bus stop is 5 miles away. Be warned, the Tucson urban area is
              > really spread out.
              >
              > It's a relatively low wage town but, then, the cost of living is
              > also fairly low -- it works out. BTW, I lived in Phoenix for a
              > couple of years (for employment reasons) and consider it the anti-
              > Tucson. I'll never go back there to live -- no offense meant to
              > those who reside there.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
              carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
              > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ---------------------------------
              > Do you Yahoo!?
              > Yahoo! Mail - 50x more storage than other providers!
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
              carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
              > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • monoceroos
              ... I d like to restate my original message a bit for clarity. Arizona is a large state with a wide variety of average temperatures. Tucson is located in the
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 16, 2004
                --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, J B <jab44helix@y...> wrote:
                > whats the tempeture in arizona?
                >
                I'd like to restate my original message a bit for clarity.

                Arizona is a large state with a wide variety of average
                temperatures. Tucson is located in the Sonora Desert and is a bit
                warmer than other areas of the state, but still not so hot as
                Phoenix and Yuma.

                I find Tucson very livable 10 months of the year -- I manage to
                bicycle 12 months of the year. July and August can be a bit toasty.
                In August, the average temperature is 84.5 degrees Fahrenheit.

                The nice thing about Arizona, is the wide variety of available
                climatic conditions primarily determined by altitude. For example,
                on the north side of town, Mt. Lemmon sports a ski area. And if you
                really like cold and snow, there is Flagstaff and the White
                Mountains.

                Unfortunately, the population is increasing dramatically since I
                moved to Arizona in 1985. And that population increase is ruining
                many of the qualities I initially found so enchanting about the
                state.

                About ten years ago, I moved to an area next to the Tucson Mountains
                just outside of Tucson with few neighbors. My area has been
                discovered by the so-called developers and is in the process of
                being completely devastated for ticky-tacky housing projects. All
                for a few bucks. Hanging's too good fer 'em, IMHO.

                See:
                www.cityrating.com/citytemperature.asp?City=Tucson
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