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"Brower legacy a green [sic] parking garage?"

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  • Jym Dyer
    =v= Article by Jan Lundberg: http://tinyurl.com/2qpe8 a.k.a. http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/06/02/EDGFJ6V4B01.DTL&type=printable =v= All I
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 3, 2004
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      =v= Article by Jan Lundberg:

      http://tinyurl.com/2qpe8

      a.k.a.

      http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/06/02/EDGFJ6V4B01.DTL&type=printable

      =v= All I can think of to say is <Greek Name> H. <Expletive>ing
      <Latin Name> on a Crooked Creeking Crutch!!!
      <_Jym_>
    • Jym Dyer
      =v= I ve read a bit more about this issue and I have a bit more to say. The story I provided a link to was posted by Jan Lundburg, its author, on this web
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 3, 2004
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        =v= I've read a bit more about this issue and I have a bit more
        to say. The story I provided a link to was posted by Jan
        Lundburg, its author, on this web page, with additional material
        and commentary:

        http://www.culturechange.org/BrowerCenter.html

        The Brower Center is a wonderful idea, except for the parking
        garage. The Union of Concerned Scientists have tallied up
        sources of environmental damage for years, and cars consistently
        take the top spot. It is well past time for the environmental
        movement to start being way more proactive about this issue
        than it is. A parking garage and building it out so that the
        sidewalk is at the minimum width possible by law are not at
        all compatible with creating "the greenest building in the
        Bay Area."

        =v= The Brower Center website does tout the site's proximity to
        transit and pedestrians:

        http://www.earthisland.org/browercenter/

        My feeling is that it should therefore fit in with this sort of
        urban ecosystem by eliminating as many cars as possible, which
        means eliminating parking. (It's well-known amongst urban
        planners: you don't reduce cars until you reduce accommodations
        for cars.)

        =v= Lundberg mentions Strawberry Creek, but not quite enough.
        Creek habitat is Berkeley's native ecosystem, and creek
        restoration figures prominently in the various visions for
        greening Berkeley. See Richard Register's work in particular.
        I find it *horrible* that a planned "greenest building in the
        Bay Area" would *prevent* that, and even more horrible that
        the rationale is cars. Trees Not Cars is the way to go, but
        what we're seeing here is Cars Not Trees (nor marshes, frogs,
        flowers, etc.).

        =v= Otherwise, I applaud the building and project and think
        it's a wonderful thing. As a longtime supporter of the Earth
        Island Institute, of Alice Waters and her contribution to the
        locally-grown food movement, and of various Berkeley and Bay
        Area environmental efforts that will be using this space, I
        think the center is a wonderful idea. One that should not
        be undermined by environmental enemy #1.

        =v= David Brower was not the type to accept half-assed
        environmental compromises. His legacy should not be built
        upon one.
        <_Jym_>
        --
        Ads below? Just ignore 'em.
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