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Re: Noise, Cars, Trains

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  • mountainsport500
    Lack of noise is a huge advantage for medium speed maglev.(less than 100 mph) In addition they benefit from a large reduction in the track maintenance needed.
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 21, 2004
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      Lack of noise is a huge advantage for medium speed maglev.(less than
      100 mph) In addition they benefit from a large reduction in the
      track maintenance needed. These systems are not much more expensive
      to build than automated guideway transit or monorails. They are
      almost silent at speeds less than 70 mph making then ideal for urban
      applications. Hi speed maglev (over 200 mph) makes less sense
      especially in countries with excellent hi-speed train systems
      already in place. See the the Urban Maglev Yahoo group for more
      info.

      Best Regards,

      Tim Prescott

      --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "J.H. Crawford"
      <mailbox@c...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi All,
      >
      > I was surprised by how loud the rubber-tired metros
      > in Lyon were when I visited in 1997. They are probably
      > somewhat quieter than steel-wheeled metros, but there's
      > a lot of noise as they accelerate out of stations, and
      > this is related to the tires, which aren't yet anywhere
      > near squealing but are still making a lot of noise.
      >
      > There are reasons for hope on the steel-wheel front:
      >
      > Perfectly round wheels are VERY much quieter than
      > worn wheels. If the system is arranged so that wheels
      > never slip or slide (possible with computer control),
      > then wheel roundness should be maintained.
      >
      > The application of cobalt or zinc to wheels may help
      > to preserve their roundness.
      >
      > I have not yet seen this, but there is in principle
      > no reason that wheels have to be fixed to the axles,
      > which is what causes the familiar curve screech, as
      > the wheels turn the same speed while moving around a
      > curve with rails of different lengths. If the wheels
      > can turn independently, then they don't screech.
      >
      > I agree that train noise can be very serious. It's
      > worth spending money to fix this.
      >
      > I would point out that I lived on a steep hill in
      > San Francisco just as diesel buses were being replaced
      > by trolley buses. While the trolley buses are not
      > silent, they are very much quieter than the diesels,
      > and they have plenty of power to climb hills, which
      > the diesels do not.
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      >
      > --
      ### --
      >
      > J.H. Crawford Carfree
      Cities
      > mailbox@c... http://www.carfree.com
    • Tony Brewer
      ... There are axle-less light rail vehicles in operation. A good example is the ULF (ultra-low floor) tram in Vienna. The wheels are in the articulations,
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 29, 2004
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        J.H. Crawford wrote:

        > Hi All,
        >
        > I was surprised by how loud the rubber-tired metros
        > in Lyon were when I visited in 1997. They are probably
        > somewhat quieter than steel-wheeled metros, but there's
        > a lot of noise as they accelerate out of stations, and
        > this is related to the tires, which aren't yet anywhere
        > near squealing but are still making a lot of noise.
        >
        > There are reasons for hope on the steel-wheel front:
        >
        > Perfectly round wheels are VERY much quieter than
        > worn wheels. If the system is arranged so that wheels
        > never slip or slide (possible with computer control),
        > then wheel roundness should be maintained.
        >
        > The application of cobalt or zinc to wheels may help
        > to preserve their roundness.
        >
        > I have not yet seen this, but there is in principle
        > no reason that wheels have to be fixed to the axles,
        > which is what causes the familiar curve screech, as
        > the wheels turn the same speed while moving around a
        > curve with rails of different lengths. If the wheels
        > can turn independently, then they don't screech.
        > <snip>

        There are axle-less light rail vehicles in operation. A good example is the
        ULF (ultra-low floor) tram in Vienna. The wheels are in the articulations,
        driven from above.
        http://public-transport.net/bim/Austria/Wien/Ulf/ulf_c1.html
        http://www.hampage.hu/kozlekedes/becs021023/e_index.html

        A further technical advance is the "Wheel-Motor" developed by Stored Energy
        Technology Limited (SET). This removes the need for axles, gearboxes and
        transmissions. The electric motor / generator is actually inside the wheel.
        http://www.set.gb.com/index.htm.

        Tony Brewer
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