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Re: [carfree_cities] Re: Free travel

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  • J.H. Crawford
    I heard from a friend recently that Moscow metro trains run at about one-minute intervals during rush hour and not much less frequently at other times. Even in
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 24, 2004
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      I heard from a friend recently that Moscow metro trains run
      at about one-minute intervals during rush hour and not much
      less frequently at other times.

      Even in Lisbon, the metro runs very frequently; it's not worth
      running to catch a train.

      The Reference Design calls for four-minute headways, which
      diminishes to two minutes in the central districts, as they
      are served by two trains for every one in the outer districts.

      Regards,


      -- ### --

      J.H. Crawford Carfree Cities
      mailbox@... http://www.carfree.com
    • John O. Andersen
      And the key in Portland is to find housing along one of these frequent service bus or light rail lines. This is still very do-able because the mass of people
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 25, 2004
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        And the key in Portland is to find housing along one of these frequent service bus or light rail lines.

        This is still very do-able because the mass of people haven't caught on that such neighborhoods will soon be in very high demand as the cost of car ownership, awareness of environmental damage, and other factors combine to influence people to choose a car-lite or car-free existence.

        John O. Andersen
        Unconventional Ideas:
        Counter-Mainstream Thoughts on Living Meaningfully in the 21st Century
        http://www.unconventionalideas.com

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Karen Sandmess
        To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2004 6:34 AM
        Subject: [carfree_cities] Re: Free travel



        > Message: 4
        > Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 21:30:18 +0000
        > From: "J.H. Crawford" <mailbox@...>
        > Subject: Re: Re: Free Travel
        >
        >
        >> I know the
        >> car culture has us conditioned to be in such a hurry that 29
        >> minutes SEEMS like an eternity.
        >
        > If it's a cold, sleety, windy day, 29 minutes IS an eternity....
        >
        Let me throw in some support for that. Until August, I lived in
        Portland, where the transit agency has partly accomplished its goal of
        providing service every 15 minutes, 7 days a week, on major routes, and
        missing a bus is a minor inconvenience.

        Now I'm in Minneapolis/St. Paul, which inexplicably boasts about its
        transit system, most routes run every 30 minutes, or even every 60
        minutes, and possibly every 20 minutes during rush hours.

        Here's the practical difference: we often attend events that have a
        definite starting time. As a practical example, I have a weekly choir
        rehearsal that starts at 7:30PM. It happens to take place along the
        route of a bus that passes in front of my apartment, but if I happen to
        miss the 7:05 run (easy to do, since the schedules appear to be mere
        suggestions), I either have to drive or to miss the first half hour of
        rehearsal. In a demanding ensemble like the one I'm part of, missing
        the first thirty minutes messes things up for both me and the rest of
        the choir.

        If I wanted to make absolutely sure that I would make it to the
        beginning of the rehearsal, I could leave home at 6:35, arrive at 6:55,
        and sit around for 35 minutes by myself.

        Going home is even more problematic. Rehearsal ends at 9:30. The bus
        that goes past my apartment leaves at 9:25. My options are to cross a
        four-lane through street with freeway on and off ramps branching off
        and then sit in a bleak bus shelter with no buildings around it for 20
        minutes or to get a ride with someone else. I'm pretty brave about
        being out and around after dark, but sitting outside for 20 minutes on
        a subzero night in Minneapolis is sheer masochism.

        Suppose the buses ran every 15 minutes. In that way, missing the 7:05
        would bring me in only 10 minutes late, and my wait for a return bus
        would also be only 10 minutes.

        If you're not a choral singer, think of trying to get to a sporting
        event or a theatrical performance or anything else that has a distinct
        starting time.

        Frequent running times make transit convenient, and if you want to get
        people out of their cars, you have to make the alternatives convenient
        instead of irritating. Most people in Portland still drive, but a
        growing number do not, and frequent service on both bus and light rail
        lines is a major reason.

        In transit,
        Karen Sandness



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