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Externalities of Driving -- Traffic Congestion

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  • mtneuman@juno.com
    This study may have already been posted. However, someone suggested the cost of $15/gallon for fuel would exceed the cost of externalities associated with too
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 27, 2003
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      This study may have already been posted. However, someone suggested the
      cost of $15/gallon for fuel would exceed the cost of externalities
      associated with too much driving.

      $8 billion in fuel alone -- to say nothing about the health effects of
      pollution from idle engines, the costs of building more freeway capacity,
      and the cost of people having to wait hours in traffic, and the costs
      associated with rising temperatures to cities, states and countries.

      Mike Neuman
      --------- Forwarded message ----------

      US Traffic Delays Cost $8 Billion in Wasted Fuel

      U.S. traffic delays cost motorists an estimated $8 billion in wasted
      fuel,
      researchers said Tuesday. A study of 75 metropolitan areas by the Texas
      Transportation Institute at Texas A&M University affirmed previous
      research
      showing that traffic congestion continues to worsen nationwide despite
      new
      construction, mass transit alternatives and other steps to ease delays.
      The researchers, analyzing the latest available state and federal traffic
      figures from 2001, estimated that motorists spent 3.5 billion hours in
      traffic. About half of the delays were caused by accidents, vehicle
      breakdowns, weather and construction.

      The worst cities for traffic continue to be Los Angeles, Chicago, San
      Francisco, and New York. Some cities that have experienced noticeable
      growth
      in highway congestion include Minneapolis-St. Paul, Denver, Phoenix, and
      Ft.
      Lauderdale, Florida.

      The study found that 5.7 billion gallons of fuel were wasted because of
      congestion, which is enough gasoline to fill 570,000 tanker trucks and
      place
      them end-to-end from New York to Las Vegas and back again, the
      researchers
      said.

      The average driver wasted about 42 gallons of fuel because of traffic
      congestion, up 1 gallon from 2000. The average price of gasoline
      nationwide
      is currently $1.64 per gallon, up 21 cents from the 2001 average.

      Source: Reuters News Service, 1 October 2003






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