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This Carfree Stuff

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  • Tom.W.Volckhausen@seagate.com
    Re: so do people in general give a shit about this car free stuff? do you got surveys? Better than surveys are real-life experiences. Carfree zones in most
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 5, 2003
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      Re:"so do people in general give a shit about this car
      free stuff? do you got surveys?"

      Better than surveys are real-life experiences. Carfree zones in most
      European cities, large and small, are thriving, as is the (limited)
      pedestrian-only Pearl Street Mall in my hometown (Boulder). People like the
      vitality of sidewalk cafe life and choose it with or without background car
      smell and noise, but anyone who has experienced both carfree and carfull
      street life knows which is a better environment for human beings.
      The paradox with cars is the disconnect between the cocooned existence
      inside and the projection of noise, pollution, and danger outside. Most
      people in the US have only the experience of car-crippled public spaces to
      compare with their passive car-cocoon interior. Increasingly, people are
      choosing the vitality of more dense, pedestrian-oriented neighborhoods
      (look at housing values) whenever they have the choice. Surveys done in the
      US would only reflect the limited experience of suburbanoids with
      well-designed carfree public space.
    • Jeremy Hubble
      Even Houston, TX shuts off a portion of downtown to cars on weekends. And the people there brag about it. Sure, they all drive there, but in the home of oil
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 5, 2003
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        Even Houston, TX shuts off a portion of downtown to cars on weekends.
        And the people there brag about it. Sure, they all drive there, but in
        the home of oil and gas, eliminating cars from an entertainment
        district has been received very positively.

        >
        > Re:"so do people in general give a shit about this car
        > free stuff? do you got surveys?"
        >
        > Better than surveys are real-life experiences. Carfree zones in most
        > European cities, large and small, are thriving, as is the (limited)
        > pedestrian-only Pearl Street Mall in my hometown (Boulder). People
        like the
        > vitality of sidewalk cafe life and choose it with or without
        background car
        > smell and noise, but anyone who has experienced both carfree and
        carfull
        > street life knows which is a better environment for human beings.
        > The paradox with cars is the disconnect between the cocooned existence
        > inside and the projection of noise, pollution, and danger outside.
        Most
        > people in the US have only the experience of car-crippled public
        spaces to
        > compare with their passive car-cocoon interior. Increasingly, people
        are
        > choosing the vitality of more dense, pedestrian-oriented neighborhoods
        > (look at housing values) whenever they have the choice. Surveys done
        in the
        > US would only reflect the limited experience of suburbanoids with
        > well-designed carfree public space.
        >
        >
        >
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      • Karen Sandness
        Tokyo closes off two of its major shopping districts, the Ginza and Shinjuku, to cars on weekends. People absolutely throng both places. The last time I went
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 6, 2003
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          Tokyo closes off two of its major shopping districts, the Ginza and
          Shinjuku, to cars on weekends. People absolutely throng both places.
          The last time I went to the Ginza on a Saturday, it was so crowded that
          finding a restaurant without a half-hour wait for a table was a real
          challenge.

          Of course, since we're talking about Tokyo, there is superb access by
          public transport to two or three points along each of these so-called
          "pedestrian heavens."

          In transit,
          Karen Sandness
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