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Re: carefree quality of life in nyc

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  • Bijan Soleymani
    ... Sitting in a sidewalk cafe or eating inside a restaurant are completely different experiences. The sidewalk cafe is a much more public place. Where you can
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 4, 2003
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      "sow_thistle" <sow_thistle@...> writes:

      > Bijan Soleymani <bijan@p...> wrote:
      >
      > But people HAVE A CHOICE to dine on the sidewalk cafe at night or
      > inside the restaurant. I personally always choose inside the
      > restaurant in most new york city streets, who wants to have dinner on
      > a highway? i discussed this with the headwaiter at an indian
      > restaruant i frequent, why they don't have sidewalk dining like all
      > the other POSH places and he said, "eating should be a healing
      > process, eating on the newyork city street, is not a healing process,
      > hell, you get soot in your food!"

      Sitting in a sidewalk cafe or eating inside a restaurant are
      completely different experiences. The sidewalk cafe is a much more
      public place. Where you can sit for hours and watch people walk by and
      have them watch you. And just sit there and read your newspaper or
      nurse a beer, etc. It's one of those things you can only enjoy in a
      city, since that's the only place where there's enough pedestrian
      traffic to make it work.

      Bijan
      --
      Bijan Soleymani <bijan@...>
      http://www.crasseux.com
    • Jym Dyer
      ... =v= If we re thinking of the same stretch of Broadway, the sidewalks are wider than that. Even with outdoor seating taking up some of of the sidewalk,
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 9, 2003
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        >>> i still want to know what you think about people flocking
        >>> to streetside outdoor cafe's on places like upper west side
        >>> broadway. If having a highway full of cars and noisy smelly
        >>> buses 10 feet from your dining expereience is so bad for
        >>> quality of life, why do people flock to them?

        =v= If we're thinking of the same stretch of Broadway, the
        sidewalks are wider than that. Even with outdoor seating
        taking up some of of the sidewalk, it's more like 20 feet to
        the street. The sidewalk is usually packed with people, which
        makes a sort of buffer zone, plus there's a row of parked cars.
        (Not that this is a great thing. They may start up and sit and
        idle, plus there can be an annoying glare reflected from their
        windshields!)

        =v= I don't think these are exemplars of outdoor dining, even in
        New York City. You see better and more thriving ones a block to
        the east, on Amsterdam, which is a slightly quieter street. The
        very best examples are many blocks south, in the oldest parts of
        the city, where the streets are narrower and not quite part of a
        grid.

        =v= (Think of the cover jacket photo of Jane Jacobs in the West
        Village.)
        <_Jym_>
        --
        Boycott Compulsory Consumption:
        http://www.xmasresistance.org/

        Ignore the ads below, for starters.
      • Richard Risemberg
        ... Besides, noisy sidewalk dining is better than no sidewalk dining...at least you re out in the mix. People are striving to find enjoyable moments in their
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 9, 2003
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          Jym Dyer wrote:

          >>>>i still want to know what you think about people flocking
          >>>>to streetside outdoor cafe's on places like upper west side
          >>>>broadway. If having a highway full of cars and noisy smelly
          >>>>buses 10 feet from your dining expereience is so bad for
          >>>>quality of life, why do people flock to them?
          >
          Besides, noisy sidewalk dining is better than no sidewalk dining...at
          least you're out in the mix. People are striving to find enjoyable
          moments in their lives regardless of how difficult our present bad
          habits make it. It's really a sing that waht we strive for are
          conditions the majority seeks as well, but doesn't know how to find,
          simply because they see cars as a "natural" part of the urban
          landscape--till they go somewhere else.

          Richard
          --
          Richard Risemberg
          http://www.living-room.org
          http://www.newcolonist.com

          "I believe that every right implies a responsibility; every opportunity,
          an obligation; every possession, a duty."
          John D. Rockefeller, Jr.
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