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Re: [carfree_cities] Second class citizens?

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  • Jeremy Hubble
    The recent ruling in Massachusetts used as the basis that the state constitution prohibited the creation of second class citizens. While this was used to
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 27, 2003
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      The recent ruling in Massachusetts used as the basis that the state
      constitution prohibited the creation of second class citizens. While
      this was used to prohibit any marriage discrimination, it seems that
      this may also serve the basis for 'vehicle' discrimination. Prohibiting
      bicycles or pedestrians on roads and bridges also creates second class
      citizens, disenfranchising those that don't have cars. This is
      especially true where a highway or bridge provides the only means for
      easily accessing a location.
    • bumpkinbubba
      ... While ... Prohibiting ... class ... for ... BB: Thank you very much, Mr. Hubble; that s very true (even though I haven t read about the Taxxachusetts
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 27, 2003
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        --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, Jeremy Hubble <jhubble@c...>
        wrote:
        > The recent ruling in Massachusetts used as the basis that the state
        > constitution prohibited the creation of second class citizens.
        While
        > this was used to prohibit any marriage discrimination, it seems that
        > this may also serve the basis for 'vehicle' discrimination.
        Prohibiting
        > bicycles or pedestrians on roads and bridges also creates second
        class
        > citizens, disenfranchising those that don't have cars. This is
        > especially true where a highway or bridge provides the only means
        for
        > easily accessing a location.


        BB: Thank you very much, Mr. Hubble; that's very true (even though I
        haven't read about the Taxxachusetts constitution/ruling of which you
        speak - got a link?).

        And then there are those non-motorized travelers who _want_ to be
        second-class citizens because they don't like the "duties" half of
        the Bicyclists' Rights Triad (the _real_, _unslandered_ Triad, that
        is, which can be found at http://www.newmilfordbike.com/Triad.htm ).



        - BumpkinBubba (an agent of the Bicyclists' Rights Triad, taking an
        opportunity to wish Carfree_Cities' hair-trigger admin a Happy
        Thanksgiving!)
      • Mike Harrington
        The whole idea in the US after 1945 was that the building of roads and the production of automobiles was good for the construction, auto manufacturers, steel,
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 27, 2003
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          The whole idea in the US after 1945 was that the building of roads and the
          production of automobiles was good for the construction, auto manufacturers,
          steel, rubber and oil industries, and that what was good for the auto
          industry was good for the US of A. After all, this created jobs in Detroit,
          Akron, and Pittsburgh and highway construction boomed, especially after the
          Interstate system was adopted in 1956. The auto industry was reeling from
          the recession of 1957/58, all the people who could afford them already had
          cars, so auto financing and GMAC were born, and automobiles were no longer
          restricted people that could pay cash for them. All this was good for
          business and the American economy boomed right up to the end of the 1960's.
          We didn't need pedestrians, streetcars, and bicycles any more because those
          things don't get people to buy cars and gasoline, and those are the kind of
          things that allowed us to have such heady economic growth, rising wages and
          lowering unemployment.

          The problem was that this economic approach was outdated once auto, tire,
          and oil imports cut heavily into the domestic producers' markets. Once this
          happened, the profits that the motorization of the United States had earlier
          produced now went to foreign shores, with an accompanying loss of
          high-paying industrial jobs. Rather than switching away from the
          consumption-creates-jobs philosophy, it was continued with the result that a
          couple of million barrels per day of imported petroleum went to ten million
          barrels today. Now, instead of creating jobs, this obsolete system
          (1945-1973) causes the US economy to hemorrhage both jobs and what's left of
          the productive portions of its economy. There's also the creation of debt
          in the form of a half trillion dollars per year current account deficit.
          The US elites no longer produce the oil, nor near as many of the cars as
          earlier generations, but stick to the familiar even though its pernicious
          effect on the US is obvious. Want to know how the auto industry is doing?
          Look at Detroit, it looks as if there's been a war there. The city of
          Pittsburgh has gone from close to a million to 350,000 and Buffalo went from
          450,000 to 180,000. US oil production has been in continual decline since
          1971. They're still applying the same remedy that their grandfathers and
          great-grandfathers used to obtain "growth," long after the patient has
          already died.

          So that's why people have to drive to their jobs, the market, drive their
          kids to friends' houses, etc. It was intentional. That's why there's no
          sidewalks on bridges, you can't walk or ride a bike anywhere and public
          transit service ranges from lousy to non-existent. It's all to stimulate an
          industrial economy that no longer exists. The only thing that's amusing is
          watching the rulers' increasing desperation trying to hold on to what
          they've already lost. It likely hasn't sunk in yet, but the modern American
          lifestyle is terminal.


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Jeremy Hubble" <jhubble@...>


          > The recent ruling in Massachusetts used as the basis that the state
          > constitution prohibited the creation of second class citizens. While
          > this was used to prohibit any marriage discrimination, it seems that
          > this may also serve the basis for 'vehicle' discrimination. Prohibiting
          > bicycles or pedestrians on roads and bridges also creates second class
          > citizens, disenfranchising those that don't have cars. This is
          > especially true where a highway or bridge provides the only means for
          > easily accessing a location.
          >
        • Louis-Luc
          ... ¨¨¨¨¨ ... ¨¨¨¨¨¨ those are Hi Mike, How can you say a pedestrian is a thing ? They are people like you. Ah, maybe it s true that 1 = 0, we
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 28, 2003
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            > We didn't need pedestrians, streetcars, and bicycles any more
            > because those
            ¨¨¨¨¨
            > things don't get people to buy cars and gasoline, and
            ¨¨¨¨¨¨
            those are

            Hi Mike,
            How can you say a pedestrian is "a thing"? They are people
            like you. Ah, maybe it's true that 1 = 0, we never
            know. Bicyclists are closer to natural human beings
            because the user can propel his vehicle by his own.
            Motorists can't though, so the whole concept is not
            human-scaled.
            And public transit is an essential service, like
            getting water from the faucet, electricity, telephone
            service, and a public network where you can walk and
            meet people peacefully.

            That means a country that lacks drinkable water,
            is not worse than a country that lacks transit or
            where you can't safely walk from any A to any B no
            matter the distance. In the 18th Century, travelers
            were walking between cities for days, stopping in
            hotels or in people's home to sleep. That proves the
            human body is capable of walking (or cycling) for
            quite long distances, and the more you walk, the more
            you increase your performances.

            Guess why the average car-dependant American is much more overweight than
            the normal American. If kids can't
            play outside, go to school or to a friend's place alone, then they'll revert
            to indoor toys, computers and TV. That's the natural thing the human being
            tends
            to do in such unpleasent outdoor conditions. So that's another factor
            encouraging obesity and
            lack of physical activity. A child growing in such an
            environment won't improve his lifestyle in adulthood,
            compared to a child who finds it normal to walk to
            school, carrying his bags. Furthermore, his is body more used to
            adapt to freezing winter days or sweating hot summer
            days. He won't catch a cold because he walks a few
            steps between a car and a house under freezing rain.

            So are the 2000-pounder metal boxes "those things" to
            eliminate, or at least reduce, if people want to enjoy
            decent life conditions?

            Louis-Luc
            BTW: Montreal Transit System maintenance employees
            have been on strike for 1 week, upsetting the whole
            community. Now the manager wants the government to
            give the "essential service" status to transit so
            full service would have to be maintained even during
            a strike.
          • Joel Hirschhorn
            I have coined the expression automobile apartheid to describe America s sprawl culture where first class citizens are in vehicles and everyone else is a
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 6, 2003
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              I have coined the expression "automobile apartheid" to describe America's sprawl culture where first class citizens are in vehicles and everyone else is a second class person; I use this in my forthcoming book Sprawl Kills; see my site www.sprawlkills.com

              Jeremy Hubble <jhubble@...> wrote:The recent ruling in Massachusetts used as the basis that the state
              constitution prohibited the creation of second class citizens. While
              this was used to prohibit any marriage discrimination, it seems that
              this may also serve the basis for 'vehicle' discrimination. Prohibiting
              bicycles or pedestrians on roads and bridges also creates second class
              citizens, disenfranchising those that don't have cars. This is
              especially true where a highway or bridge provides the only means for
              easily accessing a location.

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