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  • Mike Neuman
    Not good news for cities, especially those subject to heat islands effect . Mike Human society has now reached a point in population growth and technological
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 5, 2003
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      Not good news for cities, especially those subject to "heat islands
      effect".
      Mike


      "Human society has now reached a point in population growth and
      technological skill at which it can destroy the viability of the
      environment .... To the extraterrestrial observer, man might appear as
      unself-conscious as a fish in relation to his ecological situation.
      This ecological innocence, harmless in fish, is dangerous in men.
      Rambunctious adolescent naivete' and a powerful, science-based
      technology are poorly matched companions."
      -- Lyton Keith Caldwell, 1971

      --------- Forwarded message ----------
      http://madison.indymedia.org/newswire/display_any/14808

      ---------------------------------------------------------------------
      Rapid Climate Change is Happening Right Now
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------
      Tuesday, 04 November 2003

      Summary: This article provides results of yet another global warming
      study that shows temperatures are continuing to rise, alarmingly so,
      and rise faster than perhaps ever before.

      This study shows that spring snowmelt in the Midwest and Northern
      Great Plains has been occurring much sooner over the last 20 years
      than during the previous 80 years. The earlier than usual snowmelt is
      just another surrogate for Earth's continuously rising temperatures.

      Study after study show Earth's temperatures (land, ocean, troposphere)
      are warming. They warmed only slightly during the last century --
      about one degree Fahrenheit. But they are rising much faster now, the
      result of way too much fossil fuel burning by humans: gasoline burning
      in car driving, kerosene burning in jet travel, diesel fuel burning in
      trucking and shipping, coal and natural gas burning for electricity
      generation, burning fuel for the fun of it in motorized ATV
      recreation, in car racing, airplane flying, motorcycle riding, lawn
      keeping, building highways and runways, and parking lots, emitting
      more greenhouse gases in concrete manufacturing, unnecessary heating
      and air conditioning. The list is endless. All of this is new in just
      the last 150 years or so, along with 5 billion more people in the
      world. But the U.S. is still the largest greenhouse gas emitter in the
      world today, by far.

      Contained herein are the results of yet another global warming study,
      showing that temperatures continue to rise, and rise faster than
      before. This study shows that spring snowmelt in the Midwest and
      Northern Great Plains has been occurring much sooner over the last 20
      years than during the previous 80 years. The earlier than usual
      snowmelt is just another surrogate for Earth's rising temperatures,
      because of too much fossil fuel burning.

      Yet few people get riled up over this. The war on Iraq has commanded
      the prime time spot on every TV channel and network news show for
      almost the past year. Yet this problem surpasses every other world
      problem in history in terms of the magnitude of its destructive
      capabilities.

      Based on an analysis of snowmelt runoff in the Upper Midwest and
      Northern Great Plains - an area that includes the Upper Mississippi
      River, Upper Great Lakes, and part of the headwaters area to Hudson
      Bay -- senior hydrologist Patrick J. Neuman, of the National Weather
      Services' North Central River Forecast Center(NCRFC)*, concludes in
      this study that "rapid climate warming is happening now in the Upper
      Midwest and Northern Great Plains".

      Neuman presented his findings to a large group of high-level
      scientists at an interagency workshop directed by the National
      Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration (NOAA)- National Weather
      Service(NWS) - Climate Prediction Center(CPC) and the Desert Research
      Institute at Reno, Nevada, October 20 - 23, 2003. The title of the
      paper is: "Earlier Seasonal Snowmelt Runoff in the Upper Midwest &
      Northern Great Plains".

      Neuman says that we must acknowledge that temperatures and humidity
      will continue to rise, for an indefinite but very long period of time.
      "The picture is clear", he said, "Rapid climate warming is happening
      now".

      Interestingly, Neuman's study was not based on air temperature data
      but rather daily river flow data for 100 years of record. Flow data
      from the United States Geological Survey were used to evaluate the
      timing of spring snowmelt runoff over the last 100 years, showing that
      spring snowmelt runoff in the Upper Midwest and Northern Great Plains
      is now beginning 2 - 4 weeks earlier, compared to the historical
      record of snowmelt runoff over the last 100 years of record. A copy of
      Neuman's paper can be accessed online from the Minnesotan's for
      Sustainability website, at:
      http://www.mnforsustain.org/climate_snowmelt_dewpoints_minnesota_neuma
      n.h tm

      Neuman's snowmelt runoff study also references work done in 2002-2003
      by George Kling and other scientists contributing to the Union of
      Concerned Scientists' report: "Confronting Climate Change in the Great
      Lakes Region", which analyzed temperature data for the Great Lakes
      region and found that from 1998 - 2001, annual average temperatures
      ranged from 2 to 4 degrees F (1 to 2 degrees C ) warmer than the
      long-term average in summer, and up to 7 degrees F (4 degrees C) above
      average in winter:
      http://www.ucsusa.org/greatlakes/glchallengetechbac.html

      Neuman found similar increases for the 5-year period 1998 - 2002, with
      increases in temperatures from 1.1 degrees F warmer than long term
      average (1898-1997) at Bellefontaine, Ohio, and up to 3.6 degrees F
      warmer than average (1898-1997) at Spooner, Wisconsin.
      http://www.mnforsustain.org/mn_dewpoints_neuman_p_special_report.htm

      Source: U.S. Newswire Release, 10/30/03

      * Patrick J. Neuman has been a team leader of hydrologists at the
      NCRFC since 1980, with primary focus on snow hydrology. He earned his
      Masters of Science Degree from the University of Wisconsin at Madison
      in 1975, focusing on Great Lakes Water Levels. He began his career
      with the NWS in 1976 in Kansas City, Missouri.
      Madison IMC: http://madison.indymedia.org/
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