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Re: [carfree_cities] urban mobility study

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  • Patrick J McDonough
    ... Their website is mobility.tamu.edu. I don t know about funding sources, but I m a big alternative modes advocate and TTI does, in my opinion, very
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 1, 2003
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      On Wed, 1 Oct 2003, Patrick Kennedy wrote:
      > anybody know how to find the funding sources for this institute?? i've been
      > searching their website to no avail. but i've got money that state and
      > federal highway admins. are involved and perhaps some corporate dollars from
      > sources like AAA, GM, exxon mobil, etc. etc.

      Their website is mobility.tamu.edu.

      I don't know about funding sources, but I'm a big alternative modes
      advocate and TTI does, in my opinion, very professional research. If you
      read their report, I think you'll find it is quite balanced in terms of
      what it focuses on, namely congestion and delay.

      I see these folks presenting at Transportation Research Board every year
      and their work is widely respected.

      I'd encourage you to take a look at the full report and check out the
      section comparing HOV and Public Transportation hours of delay reduced.
      Assuming one can put stock in their methodology, the argument to be made
      in favor of transit over HOV is quite compelling.

      Patrick McDonough
    • mtneuman@juno.com
      They should have measured the effect of Transportation Demand Management congestion remedies like mine. Pay people not to drive so much. That would encourage
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 1, 2003
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        They should have measured the effect of Transportation Demand Management
        congestion remedies like mine. Pay people not to drive so much. That
        would encourage them to use the other less polluting transportation
        options, and eventually move closer to where they like to spend the
        majority of their time.

        If they did that, they wouldn't have to spend the $350 billion on highway
        capacity expansion. And think of the reduction in motor fuel burning,
        especially from all those car sitting idle in traffic!

        Mike Neuman
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ClimateArchive/message/229
        http://www.jsonline.com/news/Metro/nov99/hiway30112999a.asp


        On Wed, 1 Oct 2003 10:20:22 -0500 Patrick Kennedy <pkennedy@...>
        writes:
        .......
        > The annual Urban Mobility Report, published by the Texas
        > Transportation
        > Institute, this year measures the effect of five congestion remedies
        > in the
        > cities where they are being used. Specifically, the study
        > illustrates the
        > effect of public transportation service and bus and carpool lanes,
        > and three
        > types of roadway operating efficiencies - traffic signal
        > coordination,
        > freeway incident management (clearing crashes and disabled vehicles)
        > and the
        > use of freeway entrance ramp meters (signals that regulate traffic
        > flow onto
        > the freeway). Estimates of the effect from those improvements are
        > reflected
        > in this year's study, which uses 2001 data, the most recent
        > available.
        >
        > Learn more about the 2003 Urban Mobility Study
        > <http://mobility.tamu.edu/ums/>.

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      • Patrick McDonough
        TDM impacts are notoriously difficult to quantify. Much of TDM is behaviorally based and requires accurate reporting of people s individual behaviors.
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 2, 2003
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          TDM impacts are notoriously difficult to quantify. Much of TDM is
          behaviorally based and requires accurate reporting of people's individual
          behaviors. Tracking transit trips, which at least have ticket sales,
          monthly sales, and fareboxes, is somewhat easier. I recently completed my
          Master's Thesis on the effects and nature of employer-based transit pass
          programs. I built a website as a tool for employers to help demonstrate the
          quantitative and qualitative impacts. If any of you would like to promote
          transit subsidies to employers in your area, this may be a helpful tool.

          Check it out:
          http://www.path.berkeley.edu/itsdecision/tdmtool/

          Patrick McDonough

          -----Original Message-----
          From: mtneuman@... [mailto:mtneuman@...]
          Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2003 1:02 AM
          To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [carfree_cities] urban mobility study



          They should have measured the effect of Transportation Demand Management
          congestion remedies like mine. Pay people not to drive so much. That would
          encourage them to use the other less polluting transportation options, and
          eventually move closer to where they like to spend the majority of their
          time.

          If they did that, they wouldn't have to spend the $350 billion on highway
          capacity expansion. And think of the reduction in motor fuel burning,
          especially from all those car sitting idle in traffic!

          Mike Neuman http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ClimateArchive/message/229
          http://www.jsonline.com/news/Metro/nov99/hiway30112999a.asp


          On Wed, 1 Oct 2003 10:20:22 -0500 Patrick Kennedy <pkennedy@...>
          writes:
          .......
          > The annual Urban Mobility Report, published by the Texas
          > Transportation
          > Institute, this year measures the effect of five congestion remedies
          > in the
          > cities where they are being used. Specifically, the study
          > illustrates the
          > effect of public transportation service and bus and carpool lanes,
          > and three
          > types of roadway operating efficiencies - traffic signal
          > coordination,
          > freeway incident management (clearing crashes and disabled vehicles)
          > and the
          > use of freeway entrance ramp meters (signals that regulate traffic
          > flow onto
          > the freeway). Estimates of the effect from those improvements are
          > reflected
          > in this year's study, which uses 2001 data, the most recent
          > available.
          >
          > Learn more about the 2003 Urban Mobility Study
          > <http://mobility.tamu.edu/ums/>.

          ________________________________________________________________
          The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand! Surf the web
          up to FIVE TIMES FASTER! Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up
          today!

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        • mtneuman@juno.com
          Offering free transit passes is seldom enough to get a substantial number of people to leave their cars behind and take the bus to make a difference on the
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 2, 2003
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            Offering free transit passes is seldom enough to get a substantial number
            of people to leave their cars behind and take the bus to make a
            difference on the road. I don't mean to comment negatively on it, but
            that seems to be the case at the UW-Madison here, where a bus pass is
            included as part of the student's tuition.

            Transit ticket giveaways are also unfair to those of us who choose
            alternative non-polluting modes of transportation, such as bicycling,
            walking, hitchhiking.

            [But your point is well taken -- thanks!]

            Mike

            "If you live within walking or bicycling distance of work, you can reduce
            the global warming impact of your commute to zero."
            Denis Hayes, http://www.rambles.net/hayes_earthday.html
            ___________

            On Thu, 2 Oct 2003 07:14:37 -0400 "Patrick McDonough"
            <patrick1@...> writes:
            > TDM impacts are notoriously difficult to quantify. Much of TDM is
            > behaviorally based and requires accurate reporting of people's
            > individual
            > behaviors. Tracking transit trips, which at least have ticket
            > sales,
            > monthly sales, and fareboxes, is somewhat easier. I recently
            > completed my
            > Master's Thesis on the effects and nature of employer-based transit
            > pass
            > programs. I built a website as a tool for employers to help
            > demonstrate the
            > quantitative and qualitative impacts. If any of you would like to
            > promote
            > transit subsidies to employers in your area, this may be a helpful
            > tool.
            >
            > Check it out:
            > http://www.path.berkeley.edu/itsdecision/tdmtool/
            >
            > Patrick McDonough
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: mtneuman@... [mailto:mtneuman@...]
            > Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2003 1:02 AM
            > To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: [carfree_cities] urban mobility study
            >
            >
            >
            > They should have measured the effect of Transportation Demand
            > Management
            > congestion remedies like mine. Pay people not to drive so much.
            > That would
            > encourage them to use the other less polluting transportation
            > options, and
            > eventually move closer to where they like to spend the majority of
            > their
            > time.
            >
            > If they did that, they wouldn't have to spend the $350 billion on
            > highway
            > capacity expansion. And think of the reduction in motor fuel
            > burning,
            > especially from all those car sitting idle in traffic!
            >
            > Mike Neuman http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ClimateArchive/message/229
            > http://www.jsonline.com/news/Metro/nov99/hiway30112999a.asp

            ________________________________________________________________
            The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
            Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
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          • Patrick McDonough
            Mike- There are ways transit subsidies can be directed at non-motorized modes. Check out this link: http://www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm8.htm And do a FIND for the word
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 2, 2003
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              Mike-

              There are ways transit subsidies can be directed at non-motorized modes.
              Check out this link:
              http://www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm8.htm

              And do a FIND for the word "hill"- it's part of the company name that
              expanded transit subsidies to be a "non-drive alone" subsidy. The results
              are pretty impressive- a 17% bike/walk mode split!

              Also, remember- every transit trip begins and ends with walking.
              Improvements to transit often extend the ability of citizens to walk, just
              as improving pedestrian conditions extends the usefulness of transit.
              Transit and walking have a strong, symbiotic relationship. If you take a
              look at my website, you'll see that one of the crucial selections is
              pedestrian environment. We did not have a single firm respond that rated
              their pedestrian environment as the lowest grade.

              Anyway- parking cash-out (what was done at CH2M Hill in the example above)
              can level the playing field between transit riders and non-motorized modes.
              You need good parking management though to ensure that the system is not
              abused.

              Cheers,
              Patrick McDonough

              -----Original Message-----
              From: mtneuman@... [mailto:mtneuman@...]
              Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2003 7:51 AM
              To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [carfree_cities] urban mobility study


              Offering free transit passes is seldom enough to get a substantial number of
              people to leave their cars behind and take the bus to make a difference on
              the road. I don't mean to comment negatively on it, but that seems to be
              the case at the UW-Madison here, where a bus pass is included as part of the
              student's tuition.

              Transit ticket giveaways are also unfair to those of us who choose
              alternative non-polluting modes of transportation, such as bicycling,
              walking, hitchhiking.

              [But your point is well taken -- thanks!]

              Mike

              "If you live within walking or bicycling distance of work, you can reduce
              the global warming impact of your commute to zero." Denis Hayes,
              http://www.rambles.net/hayes_earthday.html
              ___________

              On Thu, 2 Oct 2003 07:14:37 -0400 "Patrick McDonough"
              <patrick1@...> writes:
              > TDM impacts are notoriously difficult to quantify. Much of TDM is
              > behaviorally based and requires accurate reporting of people's
              > individual behaviors. Tracking transit trips, which at least have
              > ticket sales,
              > monthly sales, and fareboxes, is somewhat easier. I recently
              > completed my
              > Master's Thesis on the effects and nature of employer-based transit
              > pass
              > programs. I built a website as a tool for employers to help
              > demonstrate the
              > quantitative and qualitative impacts. If any of you would like to
              > promote
              > transit subsidies to employers in your area, this may be a helpful
              > tool.
              >
              > Check it out: http://www.path.berkeley.edu/itsdecision/tdmtool/
              >
              > Patrick McDonough
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: mtneuman@... [mailto:mtneuman@...]
              > Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2003 1:02 AM
              > To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: Re: [carfree_cities] urban mobility study
              >
              >
              >
              > They should have measured the effect of Transportation Demand
              > Management
              > congestion remedies like mine. Pay people not to drive so much.
              > That would
              > encourage them to use the other less polluting transportation
              > options, and
              > eventually move closer to where they like to spend the majority of
              > their
              > time.
              >
              > If they did that, they wouldn't have to spend the $350 billion on
              > highway
              > capacity expansion. And think of the reduction in motor fuel
              > burning,
              > especially from all those car sitting idle in traffic!
              >
              > Mike Neuman http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ClimateArchive/message/229
              > http://www.jsonline.com/news/Metro/nov99/hiway30112999a.asp

              ________________________________________________________________
              The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand! Surf the web
              up to FIVE TIMES FASTER! Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up
              today!

              To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
              To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
              carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
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            • mtneuman@juno.com
              Good stuff Pat. But it s mainly employee focused. That s fine, but it s not enough traffic reduction. My proposal would be available to even people who don t
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 2, 2003
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                Good stuff Pat. But it's mainly employee focused. That's fine, but it's
                not enough traffic reduction.

                My proposal would be available to even people who don't have a job. In
                that sense, it would be good for the poor. Give them some extra money.
                Better than nothing.

                But mostly it would be aimed at commuters who come from outside the city.
                Those are the folks who are ruining the cities with all the extra
                driving and pollution, and who contribute the most greenhouse gases that
                are known now to be causing the warming. It is much more radical. It
                would pay $2,800 for an individual to not drive at all. The money would
                also come from raising fuel taxes by $.50 a gallon.

                When someone question the sanity of it, just ask them if they would
                preferred global warming to go out of control. Then ask them who's
                sensible and who isn't.

                Mike Neuman
                http://www.jsonline.com/news/Metro/nov99/hiway30112999a.asp
                http://danenet.danenet.org/bcp/neuman_gw_letter.pdf
                http://danenet.danenet.org/bcp/trans/neuman_vmt.html
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ClimateArchive/message/229



                On Thu, 2 Oct 2003 20:08:08 -0400 "Patrick McDonough"
                <patrick1@...> writes:
                > Mike-
                >
                > There are ways transit subsidies can be directed at non-motorized
                > modes.
                > Check out this link:
                > http://www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm8.htm
                >
                > And do a FIND for the word "hill"- it's part of the company name
                > that
                > expanded transit subsidies to be a "non-drive alone" subsidy. T

                ________________________________________________________________
                The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
                Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
                Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!
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