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Fodder for Call to Reps. in Support of Fed. Funding Transportation Enhancements

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  • Mike Neuman
    Recent surveys show strong public support for continued federal funding of transportation enhancements as an integral part of the Federal Transportation
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 3, 2003
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      Recent surveys show strong public support for continued federal
      funding of transportation "enhancements" as an integral part of the
      Federal Transportation Budget:

      -- In a Gallup poll, 73% of respondents believed that communities
      should provide bicycle-specific facilities such as trails, paths and
      traffic signals, and that 75% believed that changes were necessary to
      improve and expand pedestrian facilities such as sidewalks, signals,
      and crosswalks. [Carfree Times, Issue 32, September 2, 2003]

      -- A poll conducted for America Bikes found that a majority of
      Americans want to bicycle more and 53% are willing to invest public
      funds in creating a better bike infrastructure, even if it means less
      money for new roads. Additionally, 50% supported requiring roads to
      include bicycle lanes or paths, even if it means less space for cars
      and trucks. [Carfree Times, Issue 32, September 2, 2003]
      http://www.carfree.com/cft/i032.html

      -- In October 2002, Belden Russonello & Stewart conducted a national
      random sample telephone survey of 800 adults for the Surface
      Transportation Policy Project. The survey used a random digit dial
      (RDD) sample of households across the U.S. The margin of sampling
      error for the entire survey is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points at
      the 95% level of tolerance. Results applicable to federal funding of
      Enhancements are listed below.
      http://www.transact.org/library/reports_html/pedpoll/pedpoll.asp

      * Over eight in ten (84%) favor using part of the transportation
      budget to design streets with sidewalks, safe crossing and other
      devices to reduce speeding in residential areas and make it safer to
      walk, even if this means driving more slowly (48% strongly).

      * Seven in ten (68%) favor increasing federal spending on making sure
      people can safely walk and cross the street, even if this means less
      tax dollars go to building roads (31% strongly).

      * When given three options to solve long-term traffic problems, a
      plurality (35%) chooses "to improve public transportation" and three
      in ten (31%) choose "develop communities where people do not have to
      drive long distances to work or shop." Only a quarter (25%)
      select "to build new roads" as the best long-term solution to
      reducing traffic.
      http://www.transact.org/news.asp?id=21
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