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Any auto free literary heroes yet?

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  • Simon Baddeley
    I was pondering some while ago how the problems on which Carfree Cities focuses directly, emerge indirectly in contemporary literature - popular or high
    Message 1 of 14 , Jul 20 10:05 AM
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      I was pondering some while ago how the problems on which "Carfree Cities"
      focuses directly, emerge indirectly in contemporary literature - popular or
      high brow. Reading Scott Turrow's "Reversible Errors" recently I note know
      special animus against cars but there are frequent sideswipes at sprawl and
      someone seeing a glimpse of a landmark building across acres of freeway and
      references to the tedium of tract development enveloping what once was a
      town.

      How are people not against cars reacting to the architectural and land-use
      impact of autodependency without putting 2 and 2 together. How much will it
      take for someone like that to make the links. Are there any contemporary
      literary or TV heroes yet who don't drive at all or even don't like driving?

      Best

      Simon
    • mtneuman@juno.com
      I kind of doubt it for TV. Most of the TV networks sources of income undoubtedly come from the auto or fuel related industries. It seems every other
      Message 2 of 14 , Jul 20 10:20 AM
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        I kind of doubt it for TV. Most of the TV networks' sources of income
        undoubtedly come from the auto or fuel related industries. It seems
        every other commercial on regular TV is for cars, SUVs. They wouldn't
        like that it if a hero on one of the shows they sponsor was anti-car.

        Not sure about books, though.
        Mike

        On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 18:05:12 +0100 "Simon Baddeley"
        <s.j.baddeley@...> writes:
        > I was pondering some while ago how the problems on which "Carfree
        > Cities"
        > focuses directly, emerge indirectly in contemporary literature -
        > popular or
        > high brow. Reading Scott Turrow's "Reversible Errors" recently I
        > note know
        > special animus against cars but there are frequent sideswipes at
        > sprawl and
        > someone seeing a glimpse of a landmark building across acres of
        > freeway and
        > references to the tedium of tract development enveloping what once
        > was a
        > town.
        >
        > How are people not against cars reacting to the architectural and
        > land-use
        > impact of autodependency without putting 2 and 2 together. How much
        > will it
        > take for someone like that to make the links. Are there any
        > contemporary
        > literary or TV heroes yet who don't drive at all or even don't like
        > driving?
        >
        > Best
        >
        > Simon
        >
        >
        > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
        > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
        > carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
        > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
        > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >


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      • dubluth
        ... land-use ... will it ... Maybe there is an psychologist or cultural anthropologist who could explain how such seemingly basic relationships could elude
        Message 3 of 14 , Jul 20 8:58 PM
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          --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "Simon Baddeley" <s.j.
          baddeley@b...> wrote:

          --------------SNIP---
          >
          > How are people not against cars reacting to the architectural and
          land-use
          > impact of autodependency without putting 2 and 2 together. How much
          will it
          > take for someone like that to make the links.

          Maybe there is an psychologist or cultural anthropologist who could
          explain how such seemingly basic relationships could elude perception,
          even in thinking people.

          > Are there any contemporary
          > literary or TV heroes yet who don't drive at all or even don't like
          driving?
          >
          > Best
          >
          > Simon

          The comic strip character Fraz.

          A list of "car free" movies was assembled over a year ago. See it at
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/carfree_seattle/message/302>
          The movie that was ultimately chosen for showing at the end of the
          car-free day 2002 here was "Breaking Away."

          I'll admit I've only seen about 5 movies on that long list, and I
          wouldn't have thought that every one of those qualifies.

          I think the explanation of why we don't see explicitely car-free
          protagonists on TV is the culture of TV writing and production. In
          fact in most work places in the USA, the person who doesn't reach the
          office using a car is the exception. Why would writers for the small
          screen even think of introducing a protagonist with an aversion to
          automobiles.

          Yes they may think of it because they think of many things, not all of
          which are their most typical experiences. Besides, it could be a
          brilliant gimmick: a likable, even heroic character with a harmless
          idiosyncrasy or two that sets him just a little bit apart from his or
          her fellow.

          However, forsaking all automobiles isn't merely a harmless
          idiosyncrasy. It is disturbingly rational. How will it play in
          Morgan City?

          In order to make the movie that got him known, "She's gotta have it,"
          Spike Lee used credit card financing and a lot of frugality. One
          character, fittingly played by Spike, rode a bicycle. One of his
          rivals pointed out, "You don't even have a car." I didn't believe
          that people watching the movie counted that against him.

          I don't recall how Mary Tyler Moore reached her office, but since it
          was located in the city, it would logically be by walking or mass
          transit. Today her office would be located in a suburban office park
          with acres of parking in the midst of formidable roads. Like all
          development that is spread out make room for cars and enrich rural
          land speculators, it can't be economically accessed by mass transit.

          Bill Carr
        • Chris Loyd
          Mary Tyler Moore owned a car -- remember the opening sequence when she s driving into Minneapolis, all giddy after dumping van Dyke The Bob Newhart Show --the
          Message 4 of 14 , Jul 22 8:37 AM
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            Mary Tyler Moore owned a car -- remember the opening sequence when she's
            driving into Minneapolis, all giddy after dumping van Dyke

            The Bob Newhart Show --the first one -- had a long, commute sequence where
            Bob clearly doesn't drive to work. His commute though isn't portrayed in
            the nicest light.

            Consider shows that took place before cars were invented, or if invented,
            weren't around because the region was too poor or war-torn, or teleportation
            made cars obsolete:

            Dr Quinn, Medicine Woman
            M*A*S*H
            Star Trek series
            Gunsmoke
            Little House on the Prairie
            The Waltons
            Maverick
            The Rifleman
            Rawhide
            Bonanza
            Lost in Space
            Gilligan's Island
            The Lone Ranger

            Shows that take place in distinctly urban areas:

            Seinfeld
            Cheers
            I Love Lucy
            The Jeffersons
            Taxi -- they drove taxis, does that disqualify them?
            Friends -- I've seen maybe five episodes, but do they own cars? Do they
            work?
            The Cosby Show -- Mr Huxtable drove, but what about Mrs Huxtable? Theo
            didn't drive, and only the loser older sister did when she moved out.
            ER
            St Elsewhere -- nobody drove, except for maybe the old cranky doctor with
            his old cranky wife

            Shows that don't involve commuting by the main characters:

            The Law and Order series -- though they do drive when on business, but how
            do they get to work?
            The West Wing -- Bartlet works-at-home, though travels a lot. Anybody else
            here know that Martin Sheen is Hispanic, but plays a Catholic Yankee on TV?
            X-Files, only later was it found that Mulder didn't live at the FBI.
            The Fugitive -- saw one episode, and the poor guy did a lot of running
            Rocky and Bullwinkle
            Most Reality Shows -- they are either stuck on an island, in some
            Ikea-furnitured house, or in a 3rd world country

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: <mtneuman@...>
            To: <carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sunday, 20 July, 2003 12:20
            Subject: Re: [carfree_cities] Any auto free literary heroes yet?


            > I kind of doubt it for TV. Most of the TV networks' sources of income
            > undoubtedly come from the auto or fuel related industries. It seems
            > every other commercial on regular TV is for cars, SUVs. They wouldn't
            > like that it if a hero on one of the shows they sponsor was anti-car.
            >
            > Not sure about books, though.
            > Mike
            >
            > On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 18:05:12 +0100 "Simon Baddeley"
            > <s.j.baddeley@...> writes:
            > > I was pondering some while ago how the problems on which "Carfree
            > > Cities"
            > > focuses directly, emerge indirectly in contemporary literature -
            > > popular or
            > > high brow. Reading Scott Turrow's "Reversible Errors" recently I
            > > note know
            > > special animus against cars but there are frequent sideswipes at
            > > sprawl and
            > > someone seeing a glimpse of a landmark building across acres of
            > > freeway and
            > > references to the tedium of tract development enveloping what once
            > > was a
            > > town.
            > >
            > > How are people not against cars reacting to the architectural and
            > > land-use
            > > impact of autodependency without putting 2 and 2 together. How much
            > > will it
            > > take for someone like that to make the links. Are there any
            > > contemporary
            > > literary or TV heroes yet who don't drive at all or even don't like
            > > driving?
            > >
            > > Best
            > >
            > > Simon
            > >
            > >
            > > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
            > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
            > > carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
            > > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
            > >
            > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
            > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > ________________________________________________________________
            > The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
            > Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
            > Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!
            >
            > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
            > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
            carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
            > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
          • mtneuman@juno.com
            I believe the rules are that it must be a contemporary. I believe that makes it at least after the Westerns. How about Mr. Rogers? He talked a lot about the
            Message 5 of 14 , Jul 22 5:13 PM
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              I believe the rules are that it must be a contemporary. I believe that
              makes it at least after the Westerns.
              How about Mr. Rogers? He talked a lot about the trolley, but I never
              heard him speak of the automobile.
              Mike

              On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 10:37:03 -0500 "Chris Loyd" <tybalt@...>
              writes:
              > Mary Tyler Moore owned a car -- remember the opening sequence when
              > she's
              > driving into Minneapolis, all giddy after dumping van Dyke
              >
              > The Bob Newhart Show --the first one -- had a long, commute sequence
              > where
              > Bob clearly doesn't drive to work. His commute though isn't
              > portrayed in
              > the nicest light.
              >
              > Consider shows that took place before cars were invented, or if
              > invented,
              > weren't around because the region was too poor or war-torn, or
              > teleportation
              > made cars obsolete:
              >
              > Dr Quinn, Medicine Woman
              > M*A*S*H
              > Star Trek series
              > Gunsmoke
              > Little House on the Prairie
              > The Waltons
              > Maverick
              > The Rifleman
              > Rawhide
              > Bonanza
              > Lost in Space
              > Gilligan's Island
              > The Lone Ranger
              >
              > Shows that take place in distinctly urban areas:
              >
              > Seinfeld
              > Cheers
              > I Love Lucy
              > The Jeffersons
              > Taxi -- they drove taxis, does that disqualify them?
              > Friends -- I've seen maybe five episodes, but do they own cars? Do
              > they
              > work?
              > The Cosby Show -- Mr Huxtable drove, but what about Mrs Huxtable?
              > Theo
              > didn't drive, and only the loser older sister did when she moved
              > out.
              > ER
              > St Elsewhere -- nobody drove, except for maybe the old cranky doctor
              > with
              > his old cranky wife
              >
              > Shows that don't involve commuting by the main characters:
              >
              > The Law and Order series -- though they do drive when on business,
              > but how
              > do they get to work?
              > The West Wing -- Bartlet works-at-home, though travels a lot.
              > Anybody else
              > here know that Martin Sheen is Hispanic, but plays a Catholic Yankee
              > on TV?
              > X-Files, only later was it found that Mulder didn't live at the FBI.
              > The Fugitive -- saw one episode, and the poor guy did a lot of
              > running
              > Rocky and Bullwinkle
              > Most Reality Shows -- they are either stuck on an island, in some
              > Ikea-furnitured house, or in a 3rd world country
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: <mtneuman@...>
              > To: <carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Sunday, 20 July, 2003 12:20
              > Subject: Re: [carfree_cities] Any auto free literary heroes yet?
              >
              >
              > > I kind of doubt it for TV. Most of the TV networks' sources of
              > income
              > > undoubtedly come from the auto or fuel related industries. It
              > seems
              > > every other commercial on regular TV is for cars, SUVs. They
              > wouldn't
              > > like that it if a hero on one of the shows they sponsor was
              > anti-car.
              > >
              > > Not sure about books, though.
              > > Mike
              > >
              > > On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 18:05:12 +0100 "Simon Baddeley"
              > > <s.j.baddeley@...> writes:
              > > > I was pondering some while ago how the problems on which
              > "Carfree
              > > > Cities"
              > > > focuses directly, emerge indirectly in contemporary literature -
              > > > popular or
              > > > high brow. Reading Scott Turrow's "Reversible Errors" recently I
              > > > note know
              > > > special animus against cars but there are frequent sideswipes at
              > > > sprawl and
              > > > someone seeing a glimpse of a landmark building across acres of
              > > > freeway and
              > > > references to the tedium of tract development enveloping what
              > once
              > > > was a
              > > > town.
              > > >
              > > > How are people not against cars reacting to the architectural
              > and
              > > > land-use
              > > > impact of autodependency without putting 2 and 2 together. How
              > much
              > > > will it
              > > > take for someone like that to make the links. Are there any
              > > > contemporary
              > > > literary or TV heroes yet who don't drive at all or even don't
              > like
              > > > driving?
              > > >
              > > > Best
              > > >
              > > > Simon
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
              > > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
              > > > carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
              > > > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
              > > >
              > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              > > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ________________________________________________________________
              > > The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
              > > Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
              > > Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!
              > >
              > > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
              > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
              > carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
              > > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
              > >
              > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
              > carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
              > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >


              ________________________________________________________________
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              Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
              Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!
            • dubluth
              ... where ... portrayed in ... invented, ... teleportation ... Then there were The Honeymooners Gleason s character drove a bus. I don t know that any of the
              Message 6 of 14 , Jul 23 9:23 PM
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                --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Loyd" <tybalt@p...> wrote:
                > Mary Tyler Moore owned a car -- remember the opening sequence when she's
                > driving into Minneapolis, all giddy after dumping van Dyke
                >
                > The Bob Newhart Show --the first one -- had a long, commute sequence
                where
                > Bob clearly doesn't drive to work. His commute though isn't
                portrayed in
                > the nicest light.
                >
                > Consider shows that took place before cars were invented, or if
                invented,
                > weren't around because the region was too poor or war-torn, or
                teleportation
                > made cars obsolete:
                >
                Then there were The Honeymooners
                Gleason's character drove a bus. I don't know that any of the shows
                main characters used a private automobile, but I could be wrong again.

                Other shows featuring working class families:
                Sanford and Son They drove their work truck, including Lamont on
                dates as I recall.
                All in the Family It seems that Archie drove
                Alice
                Rosanne
                Marge
                that skinny blonde woman whose name I can't remember.

                No anti-automotive heroes in the lot as far as I know.

                The Waltons had a car or a truck, as I recall.

                Then there are soap operas. These seem to feature affluent people
                whose lives can be the objects of fantasy and emulation. Typical of
                most TV, I believe. They all drive or are driven.

                A more interesting comparison may be of shows set in New York City.
                The US city in which the private automobile probably has the least
                advantage. How unrepresentative are the characters on these shows?

                Where was the Bob Newhart show set?
              • Chris Loyd
                All right, when does Contemporary begin? Most Westerns have cowboys, though that era ended by 1890. You can thank railroads, barbed wire, and homeowners for
                Message 7 of 14 , Jul 25 8:30 AM
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                  All right, when does Contemporary begin? Most Westerns have cowboys, though
                  that era ended by 1890. You can thank railroads, barbed wire, and
                  homeowners for that.

                  Mr Rogers was never shown commuting. He just walked into his house, and
                  changed his shoes. The Children's programming I remember didn't feature
                  much in the way of cars. "Sesame Street" took place in a mostly urban
                  environment. Barney the Purple Dinosaur took place mostly in a single room.
                  The Electric Company had no "setting" as I can remember. Older children's
                  programming, like 3-2-1 Contact, did have cars in them, though how the kids
                  got around wasn't often discussed.

                  > I believe the rules are that it must be a contemporary. I believe that
                  > makes it at least after the Westerns.
                  > How about Mr. Rogers? He talked a lot about the trolley, but I never
                  > heard him speak of the automobile.
                  > Mike
                  >
                  > On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 10:37:03 -0500 "Chris Loyd" <tybalt@...>
                  > writes:
                  > > Mary Tyler Moore owned a car -- remember the opening sequence when
                  > > she's
                  > > driving into Minneapolis, all giddy after dumping van Dyke
                  > >
                  > > The Bob Newhart Show --the first one -- had a long, commute sequence
                  > > where
                  > > Bob clearly doesn't drive to work. His commute though isn't
                  > > portrayed in
                  > > the nicest light.
                  > >
                  > > Consider shows that took place before cars were invented, or if
                  > > invented,
                  > > weren't around because the region was too poor or war-torn, or
                  > > teleportation
                  > > made cars obsolete:
                  > >
                  > > Dr Quinn, Medicine Woman
                  > > M*A*S*H
                  > > Star Trek series
                  > > Gunsmoke
                  > > Little House on the Prairie
                  > > The Waltons
                  > > Maverick
                  > > The Rifleman
                  > > Rawhide
                  > > Bonanza
                  > > Lost in Space
                  > > Gilligan's Island
                  > > The Lone Ranger
                  > >
                  > > Shows that take place in distinctly urban areas:
                  > >
                  > > Seinfeld
                  > > Cheers
                  > > I Love Lucy
                  > > The Jeffersons
                  > > Taxi -- they drove taxis, does that disqualify them?
                  > > Friends -- I've seen maybe five episodes, but do they own cars? Do
                  > > they
                  > > work?
                  > > The Cosby Show -- Mr Huxtable drove, but what about Mrs Huxtable?
                  > > Theo
                  > > didn't drive, and only the loser older sister did when she moved
                  > > out.
                  > > ER
                  > > St Elsewhere -- nobody drove, except for maybe the old cranky doctor
                  > > with
                  > > his old cranky wife
                  > >
                  > > Shows that don't involve commuting by the main characters:
                  > >
                  > > The Law and Order series -- though they do drive when on business,
                  > > but how
                  > > do they get to work?
                  > > The West Wing -- Bartlet works-at-home, though travels a lot.
                  > > Anybody else
                  > > here know that Martin Sheen is Hispanic, but plays a Catholic Yankee
                  > > on TV?
                  > > X-Files, only later was it found that Mulder didn't live at the FBI.
                  > > The Fugitive -- saw one episode, and the poor guy did a lot of
                  > > running
                  > > Rocky and Bullwinkle
                  > > Most Reality Shows -- they are either stuck on an island, in some
                  > > Ikea-furnitured house, or in a 3rd world country
                  > >
                  > > ----- Original Message -----
                  > > From: <mtneuman@...>
                  > > To: <carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com>
                  > > Sent: Sunday, 20 July, 2003 12:20
                  > > Subject: Re: [carfree_cities] Any auto free literary heroes yet?
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > > I kind of doubt it for TV. Most of the TV networks' sources of
                  > > income
                  > > > undoubtedly come from the auto or fuel related industries. It
                  > > seems
                  > > > every other commercial on regular TV is for cars, SUVs. They
                  > > wouldn't
                  > > > like that it if a hero on one of the shows they sponsor was
                  > > anti-car.
                  > > >
                  > > > Not sure about books, though.
                  > > > Mike
                  > > >
                  > > > On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 18:05:12 +0100 "Simon Baddeley"
                  > > > <s.j.baddeley@...> writes:
                  > > > > I was pondering some while ago how the problems on which
                  > > "Carfree
                  > > > > Cities"
                  > > > > focuses directly, emerge indirectly in contemporary literature -
                  > > > > popular or
                  > > > > high brow. Reading Scott Turrow's "Reversible Errors" recently I
                  > > > > note know
                  > > > > special animus against cars but there are frequent sideswipes at
                  > > > > sprawl and
                  > > > > someone seeing a glimpse of a landmark building across acres of
                  > > > > freeway and
                  > > > > references to the tedium of tract development enveloping what
                  > > once
                  > > > > was a
                  > > > > town.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > How are people not against cars reacting to the architectural
                  > > and
                  > > > > land-use
                  > > > > impact of autodependency without putting 2 and 2 together. How
                  > > much
                  > > > > will it
                  > > > > take for someone like that to make the links. Are there any
                  > > > > contemporary
                  > > > > literary or TV heroes yet who don't drive at all or even don't
                  > > like
                  > > > > driving?
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Best
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Simon
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
                  > > > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                  > > > > carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
                  > > > > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  > > > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > ________________________________________________________________
                  > > > The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
                  > > > Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
                  > > > Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!
                  > > >
                  > > > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
                  > > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                  > > carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
                  > > > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
                  > > >
                  > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
                  > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                  > > carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
                  > > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
                  > >
                  > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________________________________________
                  > The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
                  > Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
                  > Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!
                  >
                  > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
                  > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                  carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
                  > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • mtneuman@juno.com
                  Henry David Thoreau would be my suggestion. Although the personal automobile wasn t in use yet, the train car was. Here s what Thoreau had to say about
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jul 30 5:10 AM
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                    Henry David Thoreau would be my suggestion. Although the personal
                    automobile wasn't in use yet, the train "car" was. Here's what Thoreau
                    had to say about travelling by train car as oppose to more primitive
                    ways:

                    "One says to me, "I wonder that you do not lay up money; you love to
                    travel; you might take the cars and go to Fichburg today and see the
                    country." But I am wiser than that. I have learned that the swiftest
                    traveller is he that goes afoot...."
                    ......

                    "Our inventions are won't to be pretty toys, which distract our attention
                    from serious things. They are but improved means to an unimproved end
                    ..."
                    .....

                    "I would rather ride on earth in an ox cart, with a free circulation,
                    than go to heaven in the fancy car of an excursion train and breathe a
                    malaria all the way."

                    "The very simplicity and nakedness of man's life in the primitive ages
                    imply this advantage, at least, that they left him still but a sojourner
                    in nature. When he was refreshed with food and sleep, he contemplated
                    his journey again. He dwelt, as it were, in a tent in this world, and
                    was either treading the valleys, or crossing the plains, or climbing the
                    mountain-tops. But lo! Men have become the tools of their tools."

                    From Thoreau's book "Walden" (1862), in the chapter called "Economy".


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                  • fireplug
                    Have you heard about the Honku movement in Brooklyn, New York or the book that grew out of it? Check it out: http://www.honku.org. This was/is a true moment
                    Message 9 of 14 , Aug 3, 2003
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                      Have you heard about the "Honku" movement in Brooklyn, New York or
                      the book that grew out of it? Check it out: http://www.honku.org
                      This was/is a true moment of auto-free literary heroism... I'll post
                      some of the honku poems next...



                      --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "Simon Baddeley"
                      <s.j.baddeley@b...> wrote:
                      > I was pondering some while ago how the problems on which "Carfree
                      Cities"
                      > focuses directly, emerge indirectly in contemporary literature -
                      popular or
                      > high brow. Reading Scott Turrow's "Reversible Errors" recently I
                      note know
                      > special animus against cars but there are frequent sideswipes at
                      sprawl and
                      > someone seeing a glimpse of a landmark building across acres of
                      freeway and
                      > references to the tedium of tract development enveloping what once
                      was a
                      > town.
                      >
                      > How are people not against cars reacting to the architectural and
                      land-use
                      > impact of autodependency without putting 2 and 2 together. How much
                      will it
                      > take for someone like that to make the links. Are there any
                      contemporary
                      > literary or TV heroes yet who don't drive at all or even don't like
                      driving?
                      >
                      > Best
                      >
                      > Simon
                    • fireplug
                      Not sure if this qualifies as literary heroism, but below are some very funny haiku (or honku ) poems about cars, traffic, and the absurdity of the American
                      Message 10 of 14 , Aug 3, 2003
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                        Not sure if this qualifies as literary heroism, but below are some
                        very funny haiku (or "honku") poems about cars, traffic, and the
                        absurdity of the American automobile experience. Please feel free to
                        forward these to friends. And write your own. The honku "movement"
                        and the book (Honku: The Zen Antidote to Road Rage) started on
                        lampposts in Brooklyn, New York. There's lots more here:
                        http://www.honku.org Funny stuff...

                        Our urban fabric
                        the cheap upholstery of
                        traffic engineers

                        Atlanta traffic
                        easy to see why Sherman
                        burned this city down.

                        Aggro tailgate man
                        next time make it a grande
                        Prozacaccino

                        That's right, nosepicker
                        the way you are in your car
                        is the way you are

                        The air in Houston -
                        too darn thick to breathe but our
                        sunsets look pretty

                        Let the forest burn
                        the Toyota Sequoia
                        continues to grow

                        Gas-guzzler flying
                        little American flags -
                        the Saudis thank you

                        Is it profiling
                        to say, "Dude in the Hummer
                        is an idiot"?

                        Her Ford Explorer
                        on a never-ending quest
                        for a parking spot

                        The evolution
                        of cars is stuck in reverse -
                        dinosaurs now rule

                        Seething in traffic
                        bike-borne I pass you each block
                        we do the same dance

                        Silicon Valley
                        10% unemployment
                        traffic's much better

                        Alaska's melting –
                        hope your Yukon Denali
                        doubles as a boat.

                        There are only three
                        types of drivers – the insane,
                        the morons, and me

                        If you really love
                        America, hang that flag
                        on a bicycle

                        Ford, GM, Chrysler
                        zero-percent financing -
                        great deal: more traffic

                        http://www.honku.org
                      • Mike Harrington
                        Great site. He s got a great blog, too: http://www.naparstek.com/ ... From: fireplug To: Sent:
                        Message 11 of 14 , Aug 3, 2003
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                          Great site. He's got a great blog, too:
                          http://www.naparstek.com/


                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "fireplug" <fireplug_98@...>
                          To: <carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Sunday, August 03, 2003 9:19 PM
                          Subject: [carfree_cities] Re: Any auto free literary heroes yet?


                          >
                          > Have you heard about the "Honku" movement in Brooklyn, New York or
                          > the book that grew out of it? Check it out: http://www.honku.org
                          > This was/is a true moment of auto-free literary heroism... I'll post
                          > some of the honku poems next...
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "Simon Baddeley"
                          > <s.j.baddeley@b...> wrote:
                          > > I was pondering some while ago how the problems on which "Carfree
                          > Cities"
                          > > focuses directly, emerge indirectly in contemporary literature -
                          > popular or
                          > > high brow. Reading Scott Turrow's "Reversible Errors" recently I
                          > note know
                          > > special animus against cars but there are frequent sideswipes at
                          > sprawl and
                          > > someone seeing a glimpse of a landmark building across acres of
                          > freeway and
                          > > references to the tedium of tract development enveloping what once
                          > was a
                          > > town.
                          > >
                          > > How are people not against cars reacting to the architectural and
                          > land-use
                          > > impact of autodependency without putting 2 and 2 together. How much
                          > will it
                          > > take for someone like that to make the links. Are there any
                          > contemporary
                          > > literary or TV heroes yet who don't drive at all or even don't like
                          > driving?
                          > >
                          > > Best
                          > >
                          > > Simon
                          >
                          >
                          > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
                          > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                          carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
                          > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
                          >
                          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                          >
                          >
                          >
                        • look384
                          Bill Bryson, author of A Walk in the Woods, I m a Stranger Here Myself and A Sunburnt Land. He may not be completely carfree, but he often writes about the
                          Message 12 of 14 , Aug 7, 2003
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                            Bill Bryson, author of A Walk in the Woods, I'm a Stranger Here
                            Myself and A Sunburnt Land. He may not be completely carfree, but he
                            often writes about the virtues of human scale development, walking
                            and the absurd dependence on automobiles.

                            Kevin
                          • Andie Miller
                            And of course Ray Bradbury who has transported us to outer space , but at 82, has never driven a car.
                            Message 13 of 14 , Aug 8, 2003
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                              And of course Ray Bradbury who has 'transported us to outer space', but at
                              82, has never driven a car.
                            • Bijan Soleymani
                              ... There s also another reason of course. The car companies, who are big advertisers, might not like it so much. Bijan -- Bijan Soleymani
                              Message 14 of 14 , Nov 28, 2003
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                                "dubluth" <dubluth@...> writes:

                                > I think the explanation of why we don't see explicitely car-free
                                > protagonists on TV is the culture of TV writing and production. In
                                > fact in most work places in the USA, the person who doesn't reach the
                                > office using a car is the exception. Why would writers for the small
                                > screen even think of introducing a protagonist with an aversion to
                                > automobiles.

                                There's also another reason of course. The car companies, who are big
                                advertisers, might not like it so much.

                                Bijan
                                --
                                Bijan Soleymani <bijan@...>
                                http://www.crasseux.com
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