Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

trails in development

Expand Messages
  • dubluth
    Planning incorporates trails. This article was posted to By
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 9, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Planning incorporates trails.
      This article was posted to <groups.yahoo.com/group/carfree>
      <http://www.indystar.com/print/articles/1/034669-9371-009.html>

      By Jason Thomas
      jason.thomas@...
      April 9, 2003

      Trails and open spaces built within housing developments help foster a healthy lifestyle for residents, advocates say.

      The pathways and parks also are appealing aesthetically, according to planners.

      Developments in places such as Carmel and Greenwood are being built with trails and parks that tie into a communitywide trail plan.

      Officials with the Center for Advancement of Health in Washington say new research shows that people who live in a community where they can walk to complete simple chores make almost twice as many weekly trips on foot as residents in less-walkable neighborhoods.

      "The way that people live now is so different than the way they used to live," said Becky Ham, a science reporter for the health center.

      "In your daily life, you used to have exercise built into everyday things. You could walk to the grocery. We've lost that. When we rebuild neighborhoods, we need to encourage these kinds of activities that make it much easier to get the exercise the body needs."

      Part of the blame can be heaped on urban sprawl. Suburban subdivisions have been built with convenience -- and the automobile -- in mind.

      "For the past 50 years, we've been building suburbs on the assumption that people will drive absolutely everywhere they have to go," said James Sallis, professor of psychology at San Diego State University.

      Things have begun to change in central Indiana. Carmel, for instance, has an ordinance requiring developers to set aside 15 percent to 20 percent of land for open space. That could mean the preservation of trees and the creation of small parks or trails. Developments such as the Village of WestClay and Prairie View in the Carmel area and the planned University Park subdivision in Greenwood are examples of an emphasis on open space.

      Roger Stephens, director of government affairs for the Builders Association of Greater Indianapolis, said that as developers push for mixed-use developments, more subdivisions are being built with open space and trails.

      "It's happening more and more, that's for sure," he said. "Having a planned unit development allows them to do things more creatively and create open spaces that allow for trails."

      Green space benefits the entire community, said Mike Hollibaugh, director of the Department of Community Services in Carmel.

      "The trail system and the open space becomes a marketing element used to sell the product," he said. "It also becomes a community benefit in the sense that it allows people someplace to go other than their back yard."

      The idea of using trails and open space in developments has been around for years, according to Greenwood planner Ed Ferguson. In the early 1980s, Greenwood began requiring on-site storm water detention, thus creating ponds and green space.

      Greenwood parks officials have launched a plan to create a communitywide trails system. Future developments might have their own trails that tie into the bigger system. Carmel already has a system in place.

      "The other trend that has caught hold in recent years is to provide trails and pathways for multiple uses rather than just 4-foot sidewalks," Ferguson said. "They're being built for all different types of users to coexist and commingle."

      The multiple uses include not only exercise, but a method other than driving to get to stores, schools and work, either by walking or biking.

      Central Indiana might be a leader in the trails trend. Sallis estimates that only 2 percent of all developments in the country are being built with walking in mind.

      "We think those kinds of developments are really promising and very important for the whole country becoming healthier," Sallis said. "The problem with them is there are not enough of them."


      Call Star reporter Jason Thomas at 1-317-844-6031.
    • John O. Andersen
      Thanks for this link to the Indianapolis article. I used to live in Indianapolis, and know from personal experience just how excessively conservative those
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 10, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks for this link to the Indianapolis article.

        I used to live in Indianapolis, and know from personal experience just how excessively conservative those suburbs of Greenwood (especially), and Carmel are.

        To hear that they're actually doing something considered progressive, just blows my mind.

        There is hope after all!

        John O. Andersen
        Unconventional Ideas:
        Counter-Mainstream Thoughts on Living Meaningfully in the 21st Century
        http://www.unconventionalideas.com

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: dubluth
        To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, April 09, 2003 8:28 PM
        Subject: [carfree_cities] trails in development


        Planning incorporates trails.
        This article was posted to <groups.yahoo.com/group/carfree>
        <http://www.indystar.com/print/articles/1/034669-9371-009.html>

        By Jason Thomas
        jason.thomas@...
        April 9, 2003

        Trails and open spaces built within housing developments help foster a healthy lifestyle for residents, advocates say.

        The pathways and parks also are appealing aesthetically, according to planners.

        Developments in places such as Carmel and Greenwood are being built with trails and parks that tie into a communitywide trail plan.

        Officials with the Center for Advancement of Health in Washington say new research shows that people who live in a community where they can walk to complete simple chores make almost twice as many weekly trips on foot as residents in less-walkable neighborhoods.

        "The way that people live now is so different than the way they used to live," said Becky Ham, a science reporter for the health center.

        "In your daily life, you used to have exercise built into everyday things. You could walk to the grocery. We've lost that. When we rebuild neighborhoods, we need to encourage these kinds of activities that make it much easier to get the exercise the body needs."

        Part of the blame can be heaped on urban sprawl. Suburban subdivisions have been built with convenience -- and the automobile -- in mind.

        "For the past 50 years, we've been building suburbs on the assumption that people will drive absolutely everywhere they have to go," said James Sallis, professor of psychology at San Diego State University.

        Things have begun to change in central Indiana. Carmel, for instance, has an ordinance requiring developers to set aside 15 percent to 20 percent of land for open space. That could mean the preservation of trees and the creation of small parks or trails. Developments such as the Village of WestClay and Prairie View in the Carmel area and the planned University Park subdivision in Greenwood are examples of an emphasis on open space.

        Roger Stephens, director of government affairs for the Builders Association of Greater Indianapolis, said that as developers push for mixed-use developments, more subdivisions are being built with open space and trails.

        "It's happening more and more, that's for sure," he said. "Having a planned unit development allows them to do things more creatively and create open spaces that allow for trails."

        Green space benefits the entire community, said Mike Hollibaugh, director of the Department of Community Services in Carmel.

        "The trail system and the open space becomes a marketing element used to sell the product," he said. "It also becomes a community benefit in the sense that it allows people someplace to go other than their back yard."

        The idea of using trails and open space in developments has been around for years, according to Greenwood planner Ed Ferguson. In the early 1980s, Greenwood began requiring on-site storm water detention, thus creating ponds and green space.

        Greenwood parks officials have launched a plan to create a communitywide trails system. Future developments might have their own trails that tie into the bigger system. Carmel already has a system in place.

        "The other trend that has caught hold in recent years is to provide trails and pathways for multiple uses rather than just 4-foot sidewalks," Ferguson said. "They're being built for all different types of users to coexist and commingle."

        The multiple uses include not only exercise, but a method other than driving to get to stores, schools and work, either by walking or biking.

        Central Indiana might be a leader in the trails trend. Sallis estimates that only 2 percent of all developments in the country are being built with walking in mind.

        "We think those kinds of developments are really promising and very important for the whole country becoming healthier," Sallis said. "The problem with them is there are not enough of them."


        Call Star reporter Jason Thomas at 1-317-844-6031.


        To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
        To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
        Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.