Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: What's in a Name? The Less the Better!--Organic Exercise

Expand Messages
  • John O. Andersen
    I call it organic exercise, and have written an essay on the subject. I ll post it below. John O. Andersen Unconventional Ideas: Counter-Mainstream Thoughts on
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 6 4:30 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      I call it organic exercise, and have written an essay on the subject.

      I'll post it below.

      John O. Andersen
      Unconventional Ideas:
      Counter-Mainstream Thoughts on Living Meaningfully in the 21st Century
      http://www.unconventionalideas.com
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Richard Risemberg" <rickrise@...>
      To: <carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2003 3:41 PM
      Subject: Re: [carfree_cities] What's in a Name? The Less the Better!


      I'd think "ancillary exercise" is the stuff we do because we don't exercise
      enough in daily life. How about "circumstantial exercise"?

      Richard

      -------Original Message-------
      From: paulparma <info@...>
      Sent: 03/06/03 12:15 PM
      To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [carfree_cities] What's in a Name? The Less the Better!

      >
      > Was trying to give a succinct name to that exercise that one gets by
      just the things one does over the course of a typical day with no
      specific intention of getting such exercise.

      I came up with 'Ancillary Exercise'.

      Unintentional Exercise?
      Quotidianâ?¦
      Accidentalâ?¦

      Luckily, I had to cut the paragraph with the unsure nomenclature due
      to length limits in the report.

      Ideas? If it isn't a often spoke of spoke aspect of anthropology I
      think it should be especially when comparing car cultures to non-auto
      ones.

      Paul Parma





      http://www.unconventionalideas.com/organic.html

      Organic Exercise:
      WHAT IT IS AND WHY IT MAKES SENSE
      By JOHN O. ANDERSEN
      January 25, 2003




      Organic exercise involves using human power to accomplish everyday tasks.
      It's about the exercise you get while working, or traveling under your own
      steam to get somewhere. It's not exercise as an end unto itself, but as a
      means to something else.

      ORGANIC EXERCISE = TRANSPORTATION, AND PERFORMING DAILY TASKS

      It could be walking to the store, and bringing your groceries home in a
      cart. It could mean cycling to your friend's house. It might include walking
      to school. It could mean mowing your lawn with a push mower instead of a gas
      mower. It could involve doing a home project with hand tools instead of
      power tools, like hand grinding wheat to make your own bread.

      Organic exercise requires no discipline, willpower, motivational tapes,
      videos, shinsplints, or New Year's resolutions.

      Most of us who are 40 or older may admit that our grandparents would've been
      confused and disgusted by today's popularity of morning jogs, gym workouts,
      and doing laps inside the mall, before the stores open. Their generation
      would've seen this stuff as wasteful, illogical, and somewhat vain.

      You see for them, exercise was an inherent part of living. They didn't have
      to go out and seek physical fitness: catching the streetcar, walking to
      work, pedaling to the store, washing the clothes and more, gave them all the
      exercise they needed.

      Organic exercise was how they kept fit. Could society rediscover this
      old-fashioned way?

      I'd like to think so.

      The good news is that regardless of our current habits, degree of car
      addiction, or life situation, if we're able-bodied, we can make the switch
      to organic exercise today. Below are four examples of how we might do that:



      Conventional exercise: Jog around the neighborhood for an hour three times a
      week, and then hop in the car to drive to work.
      Organic replacement: Walk to work and back year round. Enjoy spring and
      summer evenings tending your home garden.



      Conventional exercise: Ride a stationary bike while watching the TV morning
      news.
      Organic replacement: Ride a real bike to the store for a loaf of bread or
      bag of apples. If you eat out a lot, ride your bike to the restaurant.



      Conventional exercise: Squeeze in time after work to go to the gym.
      Organic replacement: Move to a walkable neighborhood, then walk to all of
      your doctor appointments, PTA meetings, and post office visits. In your
      spare time plant and tend a mini fruit orchard.



      Conventional exercise: Drive to the mall in the morning, then walk around
      inside for an hour.
      Organic replacement: Leave the car in the garage, take a push scooter to
      your friend's home, and enjoy a leisurely afternoon chat.



      Why organic exercise makes sense

      It's cheaper than a gym membership.
      It's a great time to think, ponder, and meditate.
      It frees you from the need for expensive weight reduction shakes, slimming
      pills, and techno-treadmills.
      It takes cars off the road, thus reducing traffic congestion and air
      pollution.
      It reconnects you with your immediate neighborhood, the soil, the seasons,
      and nature--ample opportunity to notice birds, trees, flowers, and even
      people.
      It can save you a lot of time. For instance, if your work is five miles
      away, but you often sit in traffic trying to get there, you may arrive
      quicker by bike.
      Fresh air anyone?


      Let's go organic!

      If this makes logical sense to you, and you're tired of trying to drum up
      the motivation to get the exercise you need, then organic exercise may be
      your simplest, quickest, and wisest road to fitness.

      And you'll probably discover lots of other great reasons to stick with it
      once you get your toes wet!

      So, c'mon, why not give it a try?
    • Jason Davies
      ... exercise ... he:-) circumstantial originally meant standing around ...:-) the exercise you get waiting for a bus! How about reluctant ? :-)
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 7 4:21 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        >I'd think "ancillary exercise" is the stuff we do because we don't
        exercise
        >enough in daily life. How about "circumstantial exercise"?

        he:-) circumstantial originally meant 'standing around'...:-) the exercise
        you get waiting for a bus! How about 'reluctant''? :-)

        Circumstantial is nice because it implies the interaction with your
        environment, which is what you're after. Incidental would imply the lack of
        deliberateness.
        --
        Never argue with reality. You will only encourage it.
      • Robert J. Matter
        Concurrent Concomitant Simultaneous Coincident -Bob Matter ... Trains of all sizes dominate. Streetcars spin down streets in a national web of reliable rail.
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 7 4:34 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          Concurrent

          Concomitant

          Simultaneous

          Coincident

          -Bob Matter
          -----------
          "Trains of all sizes dominate. Streetcars spin down streets
          in a national web of reliable rail. Bikes offer transit for
          over ten percent of commuters. Half of all Amsterdam traffic
          is two-wheeled, moving on safe lanes that bypass car traffic."
          --Jane Holtz Kay, New Colonist January 2003
        • Patrick J McDonough
          These words are too big, and sadly, concomitant will probably send many scurrying for a dictionary. Seriously, I like the mantra of our local group here in
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 7 6:33 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            These words are too big, and sadly, concomitant will probably send many
            scurrying for a dictionary. Seriously, I like the mantra of our local
            group here in Chapel hill which is tying urban form to public health:

            "Active Living By Design"


            On Fri, 7 Mar 2003, Robert J. Matter wrote:

            > Concurrent
            >
            > Concomitant
            >
            > Simultaneous
            >
            > Coincident
            >
            > -Bob Matter
            > -----------
            > "Trains of all sizes dominate. Streetcars spin down streets
            > in a national web of reliable rail. Bikes offer transit for
            > over ten percent of commuters. Half of all Amsterdam traffic
            > is two-wheeled, moving on safe lanes that bypass car traffic."
            > --Jane Holtz Kay, New Colonist January 2003
            >
            > To Post a message, send it to: carfree_cities@...
            > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: carfree_cities-unsubscribe@...
            > Group address: http://www.egroups.com/group/carfree_cities/
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.