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[Fwd: RE: "A First Step to Cutting REliance on Oil"]

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  • Richard Risemberg
    And here s my rebuttal, though I cheated by copying most of it from an old editorial of mine (http://www.newcolonist.com/rr2.html). Richard ... Subject: RE: A
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 17, 2002
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      And here's my rebuttal, though I cheated by copying most of it from an
      old editorial of mine (http://www.newcolonist.com/rr2.html).

      Richard

      -------- Original Message --------
      Subject: RE: "A First Step to Cutting REliance on Oil"
      Date: Tue, 17 Dec 2002 06:56:23 -0800
      From: Richard Risemberg <rickrise@...>
      To: letters@...

      Dear Editor:

      Regarding Mr. Redburn's article last Sunday ("A First Step to Cutting
      Reliance on Oil"):

      While the hydrogen fuel-cell car will certainly appeal to the American
      mentality, representing as it does another technological manipulation
      that solves a problem by changing its name, what will it really do for
      air pollution? Think about where the hydrogen come from. There are two
      places: you can make it out of water, using a whole lot of energy; or
      you can refine it from--fossil fuels! Using a whole lot of energy. In
      physics, as in chemistry, you don't get something for nothing.

      But that's not the real question. In my town, Los Angeles, for example,
      over 70% of the land surface is paved in dedication to personal
      automobile driving. Roads, freeways, driveways, parking lots, parking
      structures, curbside parking, home garages, and so forth--this is apart
      from the land covered by ordinary buildings. Neighborhood after
      neighborhood is gashed by broad no-man's-lands of two- to eight-lane
      streets, of eight to twenty lane freeways, bleak scars winding around
      the bruises of vast parking lots.

      What will hydrogen cars do to make all that less necessary? What will
      they do to make it easier for a child or an old lady or someone in a
      wheelchair to cross Hawthorne Boulevard at rush hour? What will they do
      to make a tranquil dinner at a sidewalk table possible, a softball game
      in the street, a quiet evening on the porch, such things as nowadays are
      obliterated by the ceaseless passing of nervous, hurried traffic?

      Go stand over the Hollywood Freeway--or Riverside Drive--at rush hour,
      and imagine that all the cars you see there are fuel-cell powered. Then
      go to any busy intersection, or into the parking lot at the mall, and
      imagine the same thing about the rows and rows of Hondas and Chevys
      there. They have all been suddenly changed into hydrogen cars. What's
      different about the scene? That's right: NOTHING!

      Richard Risemberg
      648 1/2 S. Burnside Ave.
      Los Angeles, CA 90036
      323.428.4669
      --
      Richard Risemberg
      http://www.living-room.org
      http://www.newcolonist.com

      "Hope cannot be said to exist, nor can it be said not to exist. It is
      just like the roads across the earth. For actually there were no roads
      to begin with, but when many people pass one way a road is made."

      Lu Hsun


      --
      Richard Risemberg
      http://www.living-room.org
      http://www.newcolonist.com

      "Hope cannot be said to exist, nor can it be said not to exist. It is
      just like the roads across the earth. For actually there were no roads
      to begin with, but when many people pass one way a road is made."

      Lu Hsun
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