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Re: [carfree_cities] Re: Can economic equity be physically facilitated?

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  • Marcus Nielson
    ... Is this the way modern Europe works? And does this correlate to there lower degree of economic equality?
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 9, 2000
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      >If you look at the way cities used to work, families occupied
      >buildings that were both home and work. Generally, the lower
      >floors were used for whatever the family business, and the
      >family (with apprentices) lived in the upper floors. Commute
      >time, approximately zero. The reference design permits this
      >kind of use, which also help create lively neighborhoods.

      >J.H. Crawford

      Is this the way modern Europe works? And does this correlate to there lower
      degree of economic equality?
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    • J.H. Crawford
      ... Oh, to a relatively minor degree, yes. But the western European economies really aren t that different from the USA. My part of Amsterdam still does have
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 9, 2000
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        >>If you look at the way cities used to work, families occupied
        >>buildings that were both home and work. Generally, the lower
        >>floors were used for whatever the family business, and the
        >>family (with apprentices) lived in the upper floors. Commute
        >>time, approximately zero. The reference design permits this
        >>kind of use, which also help create lively neighborhoods.

        >Is this the way modern Europe works? And does this correlate to there lower
        >degree of economic equality?

        Oh, to a relatively minor degree, yes. But the western European
        economies really aren't that different from the USA. My part
        of Amsterdam still does have quite a few family-owned businesses,
        and I believe that some of the owners do still live in the
        upper floors, but the pattern is no longer nearly as common
        as it once was, I believe.

        As to the economic equity, while most of Europe is considerably
        better than the USA in this regard, it relates mostly to much
        higher levels of taxation on income (although capital gains and
        capital itself are taxed very little or not at all). Most of
        western Europe still has social welfare systems that work
        reasonably well--true poverty is rare in the Netherlands, for
        instance, and pretty much every legal resident of the country
        has some form of health insurance.


        ###

        J.H. Crawford _Carfree Cities_
        postmaster@... http://www.carfree.com
      • eyrehead
        ... Yes! I think there is some impetus toward this kind of urban planning in the US. Unfortunately this approach is being taken only with new developments;
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 9, 2000
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          > >If you look at the way cities used to work, families occupied
          > >buildings that were both home and work. Generally, the lower
          > >floors were used for whatever the family business, and the
          > >family (with apprentices) lived in the upper floors. Commute
          > >time, approximately zero. The reference design permits this

          Yes! I think there is some impetus toward this kind of urban planning in the
          US. Unfortunately this approach is being taken only with new developments; it's
          too bad that people could not live in the rooms above the shop in old towns.
          There are buildings in which the upper floors are condemned but the ground floors
          are used as shops. What a waste.

          I flinch when I see subdivisions spring up in what was countryside but I would love
          to see urban developers at work. If only builders could or would exploit the city
          buildings as they do rural areas!

          Martha
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