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Re: [carfree_cities] Digest Number 758

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  • Karen Sandness
    ... As I mentioned in my previous answer, I live in Portland, Oregon, but if one wants to live the car-dependent lifestyle in Portland, it s certainly
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 7, 2002
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      >
      > Message: 1
      > Date: Tue, 06 Aug 2002 16:14:49 -0000
      > From: "turpin" <turpin@...>
      > Subject: Re: You need less space living in a good neighborhood
      >
      > --- In carfree_cities@y..., "justinemarysmith"
      > <justinemarysmith@h...> wrote:
      >> In United States perhaps a small handful of
      >> cities have neighborhoods as you describe.
      >> Do you live in Europe or Canada?
      >
      As I mentioned in my previous answer, I live in Portland, Oregon, but if one
      wants to live the car-dependent lifestyle in Portland, it's certainly
      possible.

      My home city of Minneapolis has become sprawly and car-dependent, but if I
      were to move back there (unlikely, as long as it has blizzards in the winter
      and mosquitoes in the summer), I could still find several fairly
      self-contained neighborhoods among all the mess, both within the city limits
      and in the older suburbs.

      Three generations of Americans have now grown up in the carburbs, and many
      of them rarely, if ever, venture into the city. (I know a high school
      English teacher in one of the suburbs of Portland who began taking his
      students on field trips to attend plays downtown, because he found that some
      of the seniors in his classes had never been to downtown Portland and were
      afraid to go there because of "suburban legends" about rampant crime.)

      Some of the Sunbelt boomtowns may be strip malls from one end to the other,
      but I bet if you lay aside your prejudices about urban neighborhoods and
      urban people, you will find that even cities surrounded by fast food outlets
      and four-way interchanges have little oases of urban sanity.

      In transit,
      Karen Sandness
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